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h the flower and bulk of the cavalry, and did not report to the army until after the first day's fighting. The rest of the cavalry was required to guard lines of communication to the rear. Meanwhile Lee, deprived of the eyes and ears of the army, was compelled to grope in the dark to feel for his enemy, which was a terrible handicap and spoiled his programme. Yet all would have turned out well at last if Longstreet had executed Lee's orders, and attacked vigorously early in the morning of July 2. Also if Longstreet had earnestly attacked and vigorously supported, as Lee ordered, on July 3, it is clear that the blow would have demolished Meade. The author speaks in several places of divisions coming out of charges with dripping bayonets. This must be considered only a figure of speech, for it is doubtful if on a large scale bayonets ever crossed, minie bullets doing the business. The remarks of Captain Battine on the importance of the army compared to sea power are worthy of
fighting. The rest of the cavalry was required to guard lines of communication to the rear. Meanwhile Lee, deprived of the eyes and ears of the army, was compelled to grope in the dark to feel for his enemy, which was a terrible handicap and spoiled his programme. Yet all would have turned out well at last if Longstreet had executed Lee's orders, and attacked vigorously early in the morning of July 2. Also if Longstreet had earnestly attacked and vigorously supported, as Lee ordered, on July 3, it is clear that the blow would have demolished Meade. The author speaks in several places of divisions coming out of charges with dripping bayonets. This must be considered only a figure of speech, for it is doubtful if on a large scale bayonets ever crossed, minie bullets doing the business. The remarks of Captain Battine on the importance of the army compared to sea power are worthy of deep consideration—Captain Mahan to the contrary notwithstanding. We must confess to thinking s
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