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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Christiansburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
ews was. About daylight it began to be rumored that we were entirely cut off, and finally at Christiansburg the startling news spread instantly through the army that General Lee had surrendered. Our Captain Bryan, who had been absent, reported on the evening of this day. The last day at Christiansburg April 12, 1865—the long furlough from General Echols. We marched early the next morning (Wednesday, April 12th) back towards Christiansburg. Several of my most intimate friends, seized by a strange panic, wanted to drop behind and go home; but I persuaded them that it would be much ball day and then go home honorably. They all decided to remain to the end. We marched to Christiansburg and camped in the woods a very short distance before reaching the town. Our battalion was camped in the last corner of the woods land on the left going towards Christiansburg. The march had seemed like a funeral procession and now we were in the graveyard. About noon the army was assemb
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
n the author's memory was still fresh, the diary was copied and additional remarks appended. These remarks are placed under square brackets [thus]. The rest of the narrative appears without any marks of distinction. M'Laughlins (Thirteenth Virginia) Battalion of Light artillery. Some introductory statements are necessary. The Thirteenth Virginia Light Artillery consisted of Bryan's, Chapman's and Lowry's Batteries. For a time the Otey Battery belonged to it, and for a short while Jackson's Battery; but during the last days the three batteries named constituted the battalion. In the Official Records and elsewhere it is invariably called King's Artillery; but this is a misnomer. It was McLaughlin's Battalion of King's Division, the other battalion of the division consisting of reserves and never appearing on the returns forwarded from the army in the field. The battalion commander was Major William McLaughlin, afterwards Judge McLaughlin; the division commander, Lieutenant
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
Last days of the Army in Southwest Virginia. From the times-dispatch, November 5th, 1905. By Milton W. Humphreys. Professor Milton W. Humphreys, of the University of Virginia (a brave soldibecame a learned professor), has aply described the last days of the Confederate forces in Southwest Virginia, under General Echols, in the article enclosed. The picture he draws of the artillerist writings. Very respectfully, John W. Daniel. Last days of the Confederate Army in Southwest Virginia. This article would, perhaps, more appropriately be entitled the last days of the Thirtews of the fall of Richmond was confirmed. The 8th was spent in camp. It was thought the State of Virginia would be at once evacuated. General Echols had a man shot at Dublin who had been sentener. It certainly was a mysterious march. We were the only (?) organganized troops in the State of Virginia. The enemy was on every road, and still we were penetrating deeper into the country. Why
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
rossed over, passed the army and camped on the macadamized road, six miles from New River. The weather was very bad, rain falling continually. Next day (10th) we remained in camp all day. On the 11th we marched before day in the direction of Salem. We had not marched very far until it was rumored that very bad news had been rceived; that a courier had ridden from Lynchburg to Echols' army on the previous night, at the rate of fifteen miles per hour, and that Lieutenant Houston, having come that night from Salem, had asked Major McLaughlin if he had heard the news, and that Major McLaughlin had interrupted him and prevented him from making known to bystanders what the news was. About daylight it began to be rumored that we were entirely cut off, and finally at Christiansburg the startling news spread instantly through the army that General Lee had surrendered. Our wildest conjectures had never suggested this explanation of the mystery. Those who knew said that, as far as we we
Pearisburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
explained above. On the 3d of April I was on guard duty, and Major McLaughlin instructed me to have reveille at 4:30 in the morning. But news was received that New River bridge was threatened by the enemy. There was most evidently some bad news connected with this, but we could not surmise what it could be. [Some one had seen McLaughlin shedding tears.] At any rate we marched at 11:30 P. M. in the direction of Dublin Depot. I took immediate charge of the rear guard. After passing Pearisburg about two miles, the command nearly all came to a halt without orders, and slept all night. I slept with them and next morning, April 4th, we moved on and found McLaughlin with some men at an old camping ground. By this time the news was circulated that Petersburg had fallen. At first it was not believed, but soon we were convinced that the report was correct. We continued the march until we arrived at Camp Instruction, one mile west of Dublin. Here we encamped. Some clothing was dr
Giles (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
n commander was Major William McLaughlin, afterwards Judge McLaughlin; the division commander, Lieutenant-Colonel J. Floyd King. This battalion was attached to Breckinridge's command [Wharton's and Gordon's Divisions], under General Early during the Valley campaign of 1864. At the close of the campaign it went into winter quarters near Fisherville, in Augusta county, but soon afterwards was ordered to deposit its guns in Lynchburg and go with the horses to the Narrows of New River, in Giles county, to winter. The reason for this was that Bryan's battery [by what authority does not matter] kept a detail of several men at that place, cultivating rice bottom lands and raising some four or five thousand bushels of corn and seven or eight hundred bushels of potatoes each summer. This detail, [known in the battery as the Life Insurance Company,] was ordered in when the effort was made during the campaign of 1864 to strengthen the army by every possible means. A strong protest was
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
d [Wharton's and Gordon's Divisions], under General Early during the Valley campaign of 1864. At the close of the campaign it went into winter quarters near Fisherville, in Augusta county, but soon afterwards was ordered to deposit its guns in Lynchburg and go with the horses to the Narrows of New River, in Giles county, to winter. The reason for this was that Bryan's battery [by what authority does not matter] kept a detail of several men at that place, cultivating rice bottom lands and raing continually. Next day (10th) we remained in camp all day. On the 11th we marched before day in the direction of Salem. We had not marched very far until it was rumored that very bad news had been rceived; that a courier had ridden from Lynchburg to Echols' army on the previous night, at the rate of fifteen miles per hour, and that Lieutenant Houston, having come that night from Salem, had asked Major McLaughlin if he had heard the news, and that Major McLaughlin had interrupted him and
Augusta county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
battalion of the division consisting of reserves and never appearing on the returns forwarded from the army in the field. The battalion commander was Major William McLaughlin, afterwards Judge McLaughlin; the division commander, Lieutenant-Colonel J. Floyd King. This battalion was attached to Breckinridge's command [Wharton's and Gordon's Divisions], under General Early during the Valley campaign of 1864. At the close of the campaign it went into winter quarters near Fisherville, in Augusta county, but soon afterwards was ordered to deposit its guns in Lynchburg and go with the horses to the Narrows of New River, in Giles county, to winter. The reason for this was that Bryan's battery [by what authority does not matter] kept a detail of several men at that place, cultivating rice bottom lands and raising some four or five thousand bushels of corn and seven or eight hundred bushels of potatoes each summer. This detail, [known in the battery as the Life Insurance Company,] was o
Dublin (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
e Narrows are some twenty-five or thirty miles from Dublin to the northwest.] Here begins the narrative properl we arrived at Camp Instruction, one mile west of Dublin. Here we encamped. Some clothing was drawn and wee had gone about five miles we were ordered back to Dublin in great haste to hold the place until Echols' armyarge of G. W. Thomas and marched with my command to Dublin, and took up quarter's in the post commissary's off General Duke. There were important stores at Dublin, We were informed that we would be relied by 8 or 9e hours, when Lieutenant Branham ordered us back to Dublin, saying that there was danger of the enemy moving ooad [the main macadamized road]. On our way back to Dublin we met the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, the van of Echols's army. From Dublin we went on to Camp Instruction, to which place the whole battalion had returned. Gonce evacuated. General Echols had a man shot at Dublin who had been sentenced long before. Some thought h
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
to winter quarters near Fisherville, in Augusta county, but soon afterwards was ordered to deposit its guns in Lynchburg and go with the horses to the Narrows of New River, in Giles county, to winter. The reason for this was that Bryan's battery [by what authority does not matter] kept a detail of several men at that place, cult should be remembered that the man was guilty of cold-blooded murder, followed by desertion to the enemy. On Sunday, April 9th, the whole army marched down to New river. The enemy was gone. The army crossed over on the railroad bridge. A single plank spanned the section cut out by the enemy. [The bridge had been burned May nt it themselves. No one seemed to know where the Federals were. Our battalion crossed over, passed the army and camped on the macadamized road, six miles from New River. The weather was very bad, rain falling continually. Next day (10th) we remained in camp all day. On the 11th we marched before day in the direction of Sale
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