hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 356 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 169 11 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 150 0 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 115 15 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 111 1 Browse Search
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
Eppa Hunton 92 4 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 92 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 88 2 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 77 total hits in 31 results.

1 2 3 4
Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
ou and your noble command must depend in a great measure the extent and brilliancy of our success. The orders closed with this emphatic caution: Bear in mind that celerity, audacity and resolution are everything in war, and especially it is the case with the command you have and the enterprise upon which you are about to embark. Such were the orders under which, two weeks or more later than was first proposed, Generals Stoneman and Averill crossed the Rappahannock from Fauquier into Culpeper county, and bivouacked near the above river. The passage was made on April 29th, and that evening, as General Stoneman states, the division and brigade commanders assembled together and we spread our maps and had a thorough understanding of what we were to do and where we were to go. Early on the following morning Stoneman, with his command, set out for the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford and a ford below and pushed on without serious opposition to destroy the Central Railroad, the James River Can
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
29th, and that evening, as General Stoneman states, the division and brigade commanders assembled together and we spread our maps and had a thorough understanding of what we were to do and where we were to go. Early on the following morning Stoneman, with his command, set out for the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford and a ford below and pushed on without serious opposition to destroy the Central Railroad, the James River Canal and the Richmond and Fredericksburg road. Averill moved towards Brandy Station, Culpeper and Rapidan Station, for the purpose of masking Stoneman's movement, and cutting Lee's communications towards Gordonsville. His instructions said: In the vicinity of Culpeper you will be likely to come against Fitzhugh Lee's brigade of cavalry, consisting of about 2,000 men, which it is expected that you will be able to disperse and destroy without delay to your advance. At Gordonsville the enemy have a small provost guard of infantry, which it is expected you will destroy, i
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
and army, and on you and your noble command must depend in a great measure the extent and brilliancy of our success. The orders closed with this emphatic caution: Bear in mind that celerity, audacity and resolution are everything in war, and especially it is the case with the command you have and the enterprise upon which you are about to embark. Such were the orders under which, two weeks or more later than was first proposed, Generals Stoneman and Averill crossed the Rappahannock from Fauquier into Culpeper county, and bivouacked near the above river. The passage was made on April 29th, and that evening, as General Stoneman states, the division and brigade commanders assembled together and we spread our maps and had a thorough understanding of what we were to do and where we were to go. Early on the following morning Stoneman, with his command, set out for the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford and a ford below and pushed on without serious opposition to destroy the Central Railroad, th
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
will report for orders to the Adjutant-General of the army. In explanation and justification of the above order General Hooker on May 9th, in a report to the Adjutant-General of the army, stated: General Averell's command numbered about 4,000 sabers and a light battery, a larger cavalry force than can be found in the rebel army between Fredericksburg and Richmond, and yet that officer seems to have contented himself between April 29th, and May 4th, with having marched through Culpeper to Rapidan, a distance of twenty-eight miles, meeting no enemy deserving the name, and from that point reporting to me for instructions. I could excuse General Averell in his disobedience if I could any where discover in his operations a desire to find and engage the enemy. I have no disposition to prefer charges against him, and in detaching him from this army my object has been to prevent an active and powerful column from being paralyzed by his presence. In a report written by General Averel
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
The battle of greatest lustre. From the Times-dispatch, May 4, 1906. An incident in Chancellorsville campaign and what grew out of it. Operations of Cavalry—e story of General Averett's interview with a Confederate prisoner Retold. No battle, probably, in which the Federal and Confederate armies were engaged reflected more lustre on Southern generalship and the valor of the Southern soldier than the bloody struggle of Chancellorsville. The events which took place on that historic field and at Salem Church, May 13, 1863, were of a nature so important and brilliant as to eclipse and obscure the co-operating movements and detached services performed at the time in connection with the two contending armies The operations of the cavalry having covered a wide extent of territory and issued in numerous skirmishes without any regular battle, have claimed but slight attention in comparison with the desperate fighting and signal successes on the chief scenes of action. A
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
to go. Early on the following morning Stoneman, with his command, set out for the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford and a ford below and pushed on without serious opposition to destroy the Central Railroad, the James River Canal and the Richmond and Fredericksburg road. Averill moved towards Brandy Station, Culpeper and Rapidan Station, for the purpose of masking Stoneman's movement, and cutting Lee's communications towards Gordonsville. His instructions said: In the vicinity of Culpeper you will b the above order General Hooker on May 9th, in a report to the Adjutant-General of the army, stated: General Averell's command numbered about 4,000 sabers and a light battery, a larger cavalry force than can be found in the rebel army between Fredericksburg and Richmond, and yet that officer seems to have contented himself between April 29th, and May 4th, with having marched through Culpeper to Rapidan, a distance of twenty-eight miles, meeting no enemy deserving the name, and from that point re
Oldhams (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
om this army my object has been to prevent an active and powerful column from being paralyzed by his presence. In a report written by General Averell, whilst stung by the order recalling him, he explained his delay at Rapidan Station on the ground that, All the intelligence we had been able to gather from a captured mail and from various other sources, went to show that the enemy believed the Army of the Potomac, was advancing over that line, and that Jackson was at Gordonsville with 25,000 men, to resist its approach. When he penned that sentence, he must have had well in mind among the intelligence which he had been able to gather, what young Wright had told him. The two Wrights, named in this communication, are still living (at Oldham's, Westmoreland county, Va.,) and retain vivid recollections of the incidents here recorded in their lives as soldiers. It is a pleasure to testify to their singular gallantry as soldiers and their substantial worth as citizens. G. W. Beale.
J. C. Wright (search for this): chapter 1.19
usion and surprise caused by the suddenness of this dash permitted the squadron to wheel and retreat successfully. Two men of the 9th Regiment, M. U. F. and J. C. Wright, (brothers) borne too far by the impetuosity of their charge, or overtaken in retreating, were made prisoners, and the younger one was basely shot and severelyr. The elder of the two, M. U. F., was taken into the presence of General Averell, who questioned him closely as to the troops opposed to him, their number, etc. Wright replied to the inquiries that there was no cavalry in front of him except W. H. F. Lee's brigade, but that the trains had been hurrying down all the morning from ,000 men, to resist its approach. When he penned that sentence, he must have had well in mind among the intelligence which he had been able to gather, what young Wright had told him. The two Wrights, named in this communication, are still living (at Oldham's, Westmoreland county, Va.,) and retain vivid recollections of the inc
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 1.19
no small measure to the success of that army. This force, comprising all the cavalry under General Hooker save one brigade, were in two bodies, one under General George Stoneman and the other under distinct lines. The destination and objects of the movements were set forth in orders from General Hooker as early as April 13th. These orders are noteworthy, as showing not only the work assigned push his command farther. At 6:30 P. M. that day, the day of the Chancellorsville battle, General Hooker sent a dispatch to Averell, through Captain Chandler, which read in part: I am directed by cavalry of the enemy at that point, and in destroying communications. On the day following General Hooker issued an order as follows: Brigadier-General Pleasanton will assume command of the division to the Adjutant-General of the army. In explanation and justification of the above order General Hooker on May 9th, in a report to the Adjutant-General of the army, stated: General Averell's comma
Bolling Chandler (search for this): chapter 1.19
him except W. H. F. Lee's brigade, but that the trains had been hurrying down all the morning from Gordonsville crowded with infantry and artillery. Precisely what effect this answer had on the mind of General Averell, cannot be definitely stated. All the circumstances seem to indicate that it had great weight, for no attempt was made to push his command farther. At 6:30 P. M. that day, the day of the Chancellorsville battle, General Hooker sent a dispatch to Averell, through Captain Chandler, which read in part: I am directed by the Major-General commanding, to inform you that he does not understand what you are doing at Rappahannock Station. To this message, Averell replied at 7:20 A. M. next morning: I have the honor to state in reply that I have been engaged with the cavalry of the enemy at that point, and in destroying communications. On the day following General Hooker issued an order as follows: Brigadier-General Pleasanton will assume command of the division now comman
1 2 3 4