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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Abbeville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
Hot night fight at Stony Creek. From the News leader, May 6, 1908. Virginian guided a flank attack at Farm he was born On—Movement which broke Wilson's great Raid. Working through a swamp in the dark with talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a story of special interest to people in this part of Virginia. After describing the return from the fight with Sheridan at Trevillian's, and General M. C. Butler's interview with General R. E. Lee in the latter's tent at Petersburg, he says: We moved in a column of fours through the city of Petersburg and after clearing the city struck out in a southerly direction, skirting the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. After getting out about seven miles we halted for the
Stony Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
Hot night fight at Stony Creek. From the News leader, May 6, 1908. Virginian guided a flank attack at Farm he was born On—Movement which broke Wilson's great Raid. Working through a swamp in the dark with talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, rd with rations I cannot now recall, but in those days we were young and did not quail before hardships. Well, we spent the night in the wheat-field and bright and early by daylight the twenty-eight day of June, we were mounted and set our for Stony Creek, thirteen miles away, reaching there in time. Meantime General Hampton had come down from Richmond on the train and joined us, our vigilant and restless scouts (God bless them) kept us informed of Wilson's whereabouts and movements. On the s
Edgefield, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
wheat-field and bright and early by daylight the twenty-eight day of June, we were mounted and set our for Stony Creek, thirteen miles away, reaching there in time. Meantime General Hampton had come down from Richmond on the train and joined us, our vigilant and restless scouts (God bless them) kept us informed of Wilson's whereabouts and movements. On the strength of their information General Hampton posted the Holcombe Infantry Legion (in which my old friend Dick Anderson, now from Edgefield, S. C., was a private, youthful but a first class gallant soldier) and the cavalry dismounted with our right and left resting on a swamp, about two or three miles from Stony Creek Station on the Petersburg and Weldon railroad and a short distance from Sappony church. Wilson undertook to break through our lines shortly after dark by making a most determined assault with his dismounted cavalry and horse artillery. We gave him a warm reception and drove him back. He renewed the attack at in
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 1.17
th talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a story of special interest to people in this part of Virginia. After describing the return from the fight with Sheridan at Trevillian's, and General M. C. Butler's interview with General R. E. Lee in the latter's tent at Petersburg, he says: We moved in a column of fours through the city of Petersburg and after clearing the city struck out in a southerly direction, skirting the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. After getting out about seven miles we halted for the night and bivouacked in a field filled with shocks of bearded wheat. The bearded wheat was the forage for our horses (would kill the average horse now) but our poor tired animals appeared to enjoy it. How the men we
W. R. Brooks (search for this): chapter 1.17
Hot night fight at Stony Creek. From the News leader, May 6, 1908. Virginian guided a flank attack at Farm he was born On—Movement which broke Wilson's great Raid. Working through a swamp in the dark with talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a story of special interest to people in this part of Virginia. After describing the return from the fight with Sheridan at Trevillian's, and General M. C. Butler's interview with General R. E. Lee in the latter's tent at Petersburg, he says: We moved in a column of fours through the city of Petersburg and after clearing the city struck out in a southerly direction, skirting the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. After getting out about seven miles we halted for the n
blishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a storur for Stony Creek, thirteen miles away, reaching there in time. Meantime General Hampton had come down from Richmond on the train and joined us, our vigilant and r Wilson's whereabouts and movements. On the strength of their information General Hampton posted the Holcombe Infantry Legion (in which my old friend Dick Anderson,im that a flank movement was practicable. General Butler reported this to General Hampton, saying that if he was furnished with one hundred picked men he would get in Wilson's rear before daylight. General Hampton rather reluctantly consented but directed General Butler to select his men and undertake the movement. The selellowed baffles description; as Old Bill McKinley says, the fur flew. When General Hampton heard our fire in Wilson's rear he pushed forward to the main line and our
Old Bill McKinley (search for this): chapter 1.17
do not conduct this column over this swamp I will have you tied to your horse and send you in front. The result was we moved rapidly across, rather boggy in some places, dismounted, sent the horses back and deployed in open order, as far as a hundred men would reach. With that formation we were immediately in Wilson's rear. Daylight was near at hand when we moved up and opened fire before the enemy had any knowledge of our presence. The scene that followed baffles description; as Old Bill McKinley says, the fur flew. When General Hampton heard our fire in Wilson's rear he pushed forward to the main line and our friends, the Yankees, were literally between two fires. There was but one thing for them to do—get out of that neck of woods, and they did so without ceremony or leave. They were completely demoralized; they would rush through our thin line of skirmishers in squads of twenty or thirty, decorated with all kinds of paraphernalia they had stolen from the people on their
John G. Trevillian (search for this): chapter 1.17
on's great Raid. Working through a swamp in the dark with talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a story of special interest to people in this part of Virginia. After describing the return from the fight with Sheridan at Trevillian's, and General M. C. Butler's interview with General R. E. Lee in the latter's tent at Petersburg, he says: We moved in a column of fours through the city of Petersburg and after clearing the city struck out in a southerly direction, skirting the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. After getting out about seven miles we halted for the night and bivouacked in a field filled with shocks of bearded wheat. The bearded wheat was the forage for our horses (would kill the average horse now) but
James Wilson (search for this): chapter 1.17
ck at Farm he was born On—Movement which broke Wilson's great Raid. Working through a swamp in ss scouts (God bless them) kept us informed of Wilson's whereabouts and movements. On the strength eld rifles into their ranks in the dark, which Wilson's men could not stand. This was kept up all nt a column on the west side of the swamp, pass Wilson's left and get in his rear. General Butler seed with one hundred picked men he would get in Wilson's rear before daylight. General Hampton rathehe firing. After getting some distance beyond Wilson's left, the guide thought the crossing throughh. With that formation we were immediately in Wilson's rear. Daylight was near at hand when we m flew. When General Hampton heard our fire in Wilson's rear he pushed forward to the main line and ar Stone Creek Station, as the Yankee general, Wilson, evidently intended, he took a long circle witthough bad enough, was not the worst of it for Wilson, for the demoralization produced by the mode o[3 more...]
Dick Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.17
we spent the night in the wheat-field and bright and early by daylight the twenty-eight day of June, we were mounted and set our for Stony Creek, thirteen miles away, reaching there in time. Meantime General Hampton had come down from Richmond on the train and joined us, our vigilant and restless scouts (God bless them) kept us informed of Wilson's whereabouts and movements. On the strength of their information General Hampton posted the Holcombe Infantry Legion (in which my old friend Dick Anderson, now from Edgefield, S. C., was a private, youthful but a first class gallant soldier) and the cavalry dismounted with our right and left resting on a swamp, about two or three miles from Stony Creek Station on the Petersburg and Weldon railroad and a short distance from Sappony church. Wilson undertook to break through our lines shortly after dark by making a most determined assault with his dismounted cavalry and horse artillery. We gave him a warm reception and drove him back. H
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