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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Lawrenceburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they came
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasaest had, I heard Tom Jones say: Madam, I would tell you if I could. Do you know how many trees there are standing in West Tennessee? She said she didn't, and Tom told her Forrest had men enough to put one behind each tree, and two or three behind tit fully fifteen feet high. The weather had turned bitter cold and the trestle was covered with sleet and ice. In West Tennessee. Leaving a strong rear guard, the command started north along the railroad, burning every bridge and capturing eved, were now concentrating in the direction of Clifton, which was the only possible route by which we could get out of West Tennessee. Next morning we took a road leading south and halted at noon at a crossroad leading from Huntington to McLemoresv
Clifton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
uary 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close tohorses were half dead with starvation and exposure, but we arrived at Dresden before dark. The enemy was closing in on us from all directions. Our various commands, which had been very much scattered, were now concentrating in the direction of Clifton, which was the only possible route by which we could get out of West Tennessee. Next morning we took a road leading south and halted at noon at a crossroad leading from Huntington to McLemoresville. After feeding our horses the men dropped d
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they cam
Humboldt, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
In West Tennessee. Leaving a strong rear guard, the command started north along the railroad, burning every bridge and capturing every blockhouse as far as Union City, save the one at Forked Deer River. There I saw a force of Confederates trying to capture the blockhouse, and, thinking it my regiment, I stopped after passing the blockhouse, hitched my horse and went to join them, when I found it was Dibrell's regiment, and also learned that Starnes's regiment had pushed on to capture Humboldt. Mounting, I made the best speed my horse was capable of, but I heard cannonading when about four miles distant. From the increasing fire of artillery, I judged my regiment had cut off more than it could masticate, but when I arrived on the scene I found that Starnes had captured the garrison, set fire to the depot, bridge and a house containing a large amount of ordnance stores, and it was the shells exploding that I had taken for a heavy cannonade. It was a magnificent daylight firewo
Union City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
eral fires were burning griskly and went down the line giving orders to the other gangs to burn instead of cut the the trestles. We made such good speed that by dark we had destroyed at least a mile of trestle, some of it fully fifteen feet high. The weather had turned bitter cold and the trestle was covered with sleet and ice. In West Tennessee. Leaving a strong rear guard, the command started north along the railroad, burning every bridge and capturing every blockhouse as far as Union City, save the one at Forked Deer River. There I saw a force of Confederates trying to capture the blockhouse, and, thinking it my regiment, I stopped after passing the blockhouse, hitched my horse and went to join them, when I found it was Dibrell's regiment, and also learned that Starnes's regiment had pushed on to capture Humboldt. Mounting, I made the best speed my horse was capable of, but I heard cannonading when about four miles distant. From the increasing fire of artillery, I judged
Trenton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ny trees there are standing in West Tennessee? She said she didn't, and Tom told her Forrest had men enough to put one behind each tree, and two or three behind the biggest ones. Of course, these exaggerated reports reached General Grant through the commanders of the various blockhouses and towns, and reinforcements were being hurried from every available point. Forrest was virtually surrounded while at Jackson. Our attack on that place was a feint. When we got within a mile or so of Trenton we heard four shots from a battery and hurried up to find that the Federal garrison had surrendered and the Confederates taken possession. We captured an immense lot of stores, guns and ammunition and a good lot of wagons. I got two new army six-shooters, for which I turned over to the ordnance sergeant my old ones. We got a little sleep that night and some rest next day. Tom Jones and I had been living on Otard brandy, strawberries and crackers, and our stock was running low, most o
Forked Deer River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
and went down the line giving orders to the other gangs to burn instead of cut the the trestles. We made such good speed that by dark we had destroyed at least a mile of trestle, some of it fully fifteen feet high. The weather had turned bitter cold and the trestle was covered with sleet and ice. In West Tennessee. Leaving a strong rear guard, the command started north along the railroad, burning every bridge and capturing every blockhouse as far as Union City, save the one at Forked Deer River. There I saw a force of Confederates trying to capture the blockhouse, and, thinking it my regiment, I stopped after passing the blockhouse, hitched my horse and went to join them, when I found it was Dibrell's regiment, and also learned that Starnes's regiment had pushed on to capture Humboldt. Mounting, I made the best speed my horse was capable of, but I heard cannonading when about four miles distant. From the increasing fire of artillery, I judged my regiment had cut off more th
Dresden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
de. It was a magnificent daylight fireworks display. The explosions were incessant; pieces of shells, of the warehouse, chunks of fire and clouds of smoke and ashes were flying in all directions. . . . A few days later we took the road to Dresden, which had been cut up by wagons and horses and was now hard frozen, and offered the worst travel I had ever experienced. Our horses were half dead with starvation and exposure, but we arrived at Dresden before dark. The enemy was closing in oDresden before dark. The enemy was closing in on us from all directions. Our various commands, which had been very much scattered, were now concentrating in the direction of Clifton, which was the only possible route by which we could get out of West Tennessee. Next morning we took a road leading south and halted at noon at a crossroad leading from Huntington to McLemoresville. After feeding our horses the men dropped down wherever they could and soon were fast asleep. I hitched to a bush close beside the road, kicked the snow off a
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ot. His famous lectures years after show that while we did not convert him, he loved everybody during the rest of his life, and if he really believed there is no hell we convinced him that there was something mightily like it. We pushed on to Jackson, but by this time Forrest, by many crafty methods, had spread the report far and wide that he had a large force with him, and the private soldiers aided in exaggerating our number to the friendly citizens and the good women, who rushed to their e biggest ones. Of course, these exaggerated reports reached General Grant through the commanders of the various blockhouses and towns, and reinforcements were being hurried from every available point. Forrest was virtually surrounded while at Jackson. Our attack on that place was a feint. When we got within a mile or so of Trenton we heard four shots from a battery and hurried up to find that the Federal garrison had surrendered and the Confederates taken possession. We captured an im
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