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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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inted so much better than, and the paper was so superior to, the genuine Confederate money it could be detected on sight. It was just as good to play poker with as gold, and our boys brought away with them what Granny Tom Bass called dead oodles of it. We moved out a mile or so and camped on Christmas Eve, and the next morning were sent to press axes from the citizens and cut down a long high trestle across Obion bottom. The men worked like heroes, but with slow effect. About noon Colonel Woodward rode up and asked me how we were getting along. I told him they were losing time, as the trestles were as hard as horn and the axes as dull as froes and had poor handles. I furthermore told him if I could get permission I would divide my squad, put half the men to splitting dry kindling and the other half to building fires on top of the trestle and build a fire at every point where the sills crossed the bents. He thought it a good idea, so we began building the fires. The colonel st
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.28
and the good women, who rushed to their front gates with whatever of good things to eat they happened to have. In answer to a question by a woman as to how many soldiers Mr. Forrest had, I heard Tom Jones say: Madam, I would tell you if I could. Do you know how many trees there are standing in West Tennessee? She said she didn't, and Tom told her Forrest had men enough to put one behind each tree, and two or three behind the biggest ones. Of course, these exaggerated reports reached General Grant through the commanders of the various blockhouses and towns, and reinforcements were being hurried from every available point. Forrest was virtually surrounded while at Jackson. Our attack on that place was a feint. When we got within a mile or so of Trenton we heard four shots from a battery and hurried up to find that the Federal garrison had surrendered and the Confederates taken possession. We captured an immense lot of stores, guns and ammunition and a good lot of wagons. I
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they came
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they came
February 6th, 1910 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they came
December 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.28
With Forrest in West Tennessee. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Winter campaign of 1862 filled with adventures and incidents. By Dan W. Beard. About December 1, 1862, we broke camp at Columbia and took the Mt. Pleasant Road and thence the road to Lawrenceburg. We there took the road to Clifton, where we arrived on the 15th, but our brigade turned to the right and bivouacked in the bushes without fires for fear of attracting the gunboats, which we had learned were patrolling the Tennessee River. During the night we were moved close to the river bank, which was a bluff. The river had a good boating tide, and was very swift and appeared to be rising. A little beyond the middle of the river was an island, or large sandbar, on which were several men and horses and two or three big bright fires. On our side they were pushing the horses off the bluff, about ten feet clear fall into the swift, icy cold water, the horses going out of sight. When they came
December 24th (search for this): chapter 1.28
. All the stores kept by foreigners or Yankees were barred up and the owners in hiding. Among the loot taken was an immense quantity of counterfiet Confederate interest-bearing notes. It was printed so much better than, and the paper was so superior to, the genuine Confederate money it could be detected on sight. It was just as good to play poker with as gold, and our boys brought away with them what Granny Tom Bass called dead oodles of it. We moved out a mile or so and camped on Christmas Eve, and the next morning were sent to press axes from the citizens and cut down a long high trestle across Obion bottom. The men worked like heroes, but with slow effect. About noon Colonel Woodward rode up and asked me how we were getting along. I told him they were losing time, as the trestles were as hard as horn and the axes as dull as froes and had poor handles. I furthermore told him if I could get permission I would divide my squad, put half the men to splitting dry kindling and
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