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McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
Buford's pickets, who advanced some miles from Gettysburg on the road to that place, and Buford in his report says, that by daylight on the morning of the 1st of July, he had gained positive information of the enemy's position and movements. The other two cavalry divisions under Gregg and Kilpatrick, moved on the right flank of the army and were busily engaged looking up Stuart, who was now discovered to be moving still further to their right. Kilpatrick succeeded in coming up with him at Hanover, where a sharp engagement ensued, but Stuart, though superior in numbers, could not afford to have his progress delayed, and he shook off Kilpatrick as quickly as possible and resumed his march. In a letter written by General Reynolds, on the 30th, to Butterfield, chief of staff, he says: If we are to fight a defensive battle in this vicinity, the proper position is just north of Emmittsburg, covering the Plank road to Taneytown. He (the enemy), will undoubtedly endeavor to turn our left
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
y at a critical moment, to unite with a distant and independent force. Stuart's movement began during the night of the 24th, but the meeting at the appointed place between Stuart and Mosby never took place. Stuart found Hooker's army in motion and Hancock's corps in possession of Thoroughfare Gap, and across his path to Haymarket. He could not resist throwing a few shells at Hancock's passing columns, but the road being blocked, and finding himself unable to pursue his course west of Centreville, he determined to make a wide detour, which carried him around the enemy's rear to Fairfax Station, which the enemy had just left, moving westward to Leesburg. In consequence the Potomac was not reached until the evening of the 27th, when it was crossed during the night, under many difficulties. If everything else had gone smoothly with Stuart, this delay was fatal, and threw his plans out of gear. Hooker's army, after concentrating about Leesburg, began the passage of the Potomac on
Fredericktown (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
d discretionary powers; whereupon I withdrew. The correspondence between Lee and Stuart is not complete without adding an extract from a letter, dated 23d June, in which General Lee says: * * * If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two brigades to watch him, and withdraw with the three others, but should he appear to be moving northward, I think you had better withdraw this side of the mountain tomorrow night, cross at Shepherdstown the next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their wing without hindrance, doing them all the damage you can, and cross the river east of the mountains. In either case, after crossing the river, you must move on and feel the right of Ewell's troops, * * * but I think the sooner you cross into Maryland after tomorrow, the better. In view of these letters, it seems reasonably plain that while General Lee's first purpose, communicated to Stuart the same day he gave
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
, but two escaped unhurt. Archer, after pushing the cavalry out of his way, crossed Willoughby Run in the face of the enemy, and moved forward to the charge on the eastern slope of that stream. His progress was retarded by the undergrowth, but after clearing that with great effort, his men advanced with a yell, and delivered their fire within forty or fifty feet of the enemy's lines. They were met by the Iron Brigade under Meredith, composed of a splendid body of troops from Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana. Meredith largely overlapped Archer and the latter's flanks became exposed and subjected to a cross fire which compelled a retreat. In recrossing the stream, he together with a considerable portion of the command were taken prisoners. In describing how the action was brought on, General Heth says, that being ignorant what force was at or near Gettysburg, and supposing it to consist of cavalry, most probably supported by a brigade or two of infantry, he made a reconnaissance
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.5
tters, Ewell, who was about to set out for Harrisburg, having sent forward his engineer to reconnoitre the defenses of that place, recalled his scattered divisions and turned his immense trains to the rear. The latter moved in a continuous stream towards Chambersburg, passing through that place the greater part of the night of the 29th. Johnson's division accomcompanied these and moved to Green Village, about seven miles from Chambersburg, whence it turned east on the 30th and marched via Scotland towards Gettysburg. The other two divisions of Ewell's countermarch, and Rodes moved, on the 30th, almost due south, about twenty miles to Heidlersburg, nine miles northeast of Gettysburg; and Early moved almost due west to a point three miles distant from Rodes on the road leading to Berlin. In view of the order to Ewell to return to Chambersburg, and the subsequent order to proceed to Cashtown or Gettysburg as circumstances might dictate, it is a little surprising to find in A. P. Hi
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
er, growing out of the campaign has been over the conduct of General Longstreet on the second and third days of the battle, and his alleged tardiness and failure to co-operate cordially with the Commander-in-Chief. In his book From Manassas to Appomattox, and in various publications given to the press, General Longstreet has vigorously defended himself, and adopting the old Roman method has sought to carry the war into Africa, and made counter charges, sometimes with an exhibition of temper whil Longstreet's official report he makes a similar statement: That on the night of the 28th, one of the scouts came in with the information, that the enemy had passed the Potomac, and was probably in pursuit of us, and his book, From Manassas to Appomattox, the scout is described as one who had been employed by him, and that he brought the additional intelligence of Meade's assignment to the command of the Federal army. Colonel Mosby has pointed out the extreme improbability, or as he thinks imp
Taneytown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
the latter place, the third and twelfth for Taneytown, and the other three for Frizzelburg, Union and his line then connected that place with Taneytown. On the 30th of June, Reynolds was again a mile or so to the east in the direction of Taneytown. The distance of these troops from Gettysh of Emmittsburg, covering the Plank road to Taneytown. He (the enemy), will undoubtedly endeavor , a circular was issued from headquarters at Taneytown, stating: The Commanding General was satisfiral hours for a courier from headquarters at Taneytown to reach Reynolds, and he moved from Emmittsto withdraw his command by the route through Taneytown, thus leaving the centre of our position opetroops on the direct road to Gettysburg from Taneytown. When you find that General Reynolds is coveturned to report to Meade. The latter left Taneytown at 10 P. M. and arriving upon the ground at most needed. The road from Gettysburg to Taneytown ran just in rear of the Federal line and the[1 more...]
McConnellsburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
he answer to the latter question must be determined from the records, and to these we will briefly refer. On June 20th, General Lee's headquarters were at Berryville, on the road from Snicker's Gap to Winchester. On the 22d, the first and third corps being within reach, he addressed a letter to General Ewell, telling him if he was ready to move, to do so. The letter advised Ewell that his best course would be toward the Susquehanna, taking the routes by Emmittsburg, Chambersburg, and McConnellsburg, and that the trains, if possible, should be kept on the centre route, and the cavalry should be used in gathering supplies, obtaining information and protecting his flanks. It will depend (said General Lee), upon the quantity of supplies obtained in that country, whether the rest of the army can follow. There may be enough for your command, but none for the others. Every exertion should, therefore, be made to locate and secure them. Beef we can drive with is, but bread we cannot car
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
atly to the length of his column and impeded his march. The destruction of stores, and the tracks of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad further delayed him, so that Westminster was not reached until the evening of the 29th, where a slight skirmish occurred. The next morning, June 30th, the march was resumed in a direct line for Hanove The 28th was employed by General Meade, in making himself acquainted with the situation. On the 29th he informed Halleck that the army was in motion towards Westminster and Emmittsburg, the first and eleventh corps being destined for the latter place, the third and twelfth for Taneytown, and the other three for Frizzelburg, Uniemy failed to attack, and he found it hazardous himself to do so, or became satisfied that the enemy was manoeuvering to get in his rear, he should fall back to Westminster. The official records as published do not disclose such papers, if they exist. Lee now had his army fairly united, one division only besides the cavalry bei
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
aped unhurt. Archer, after pushing the cavalry out of his way, crossed Willoughby Run in the face of the enemy, and moved forward to the charge on the eastern slope of that stream. His progress was retarded by the undergrowth, but after clearing that with great effort, his men advanced with a yell, and delivered their fire within forty or fifty feet of the enemy's lines. They were met by the Iron Brigade under Meredith, composed of a splendid body of troops from Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana. Meredith largely overlapped Archer and the latter's flanks became exposed and subjected to a cross fire which compelled a retreat. In recrossing the stream, he together with a considerable portion of the command were taken prisoners. In describing how the action was brought on, General Heth says, that being ignorant what force was at or near Gettysburg, and supposing it to consist of cavalry, most probably supported by a brigade or two of infantry, he made a reconnaissance to determin
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