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Willoughby Run (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ly coming up, followed Archer on the south side of the road, the guns of either battalion being used in the advance whenever a favorable opportunity offered. When Davis moved to the attack, the dismounted cavalry occupied the east slope of Willoughby Run, and several hundred yards beyond and in the rear of the ridge occupied by them, was a higher and more commanding ridge, running generally in the same direction and extending northerly to Oak Hill where the view was lost in the forests. Davithree hundred and eighty in the space of half an hour. Some of the other regiments fared no better. Davis reported that out of nine field officers present, but two escaped unhurt. Archer, after pushing the cavalry out of his way, crossed Willoughby Run in the face of the enemy, and moved forward to the charge on the eastern slope of that stream. His progress was retarded by the undergrowth, but after clearing that with great effort, his men advanced with a yell, and delivered their fire wi
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
e further precaution to send three corps to Middletown to be in position to attack his flank, if it was attempted. On the evening of the 26th, Hooker proposing to carry out his purpose, telegraphed Halleck, asking, Is there any reason why Maryland Heights should not be abandoned? adding that he proposed to visit the place on the next day to satisfy himself on that point. Halleck replied the next morning: Maryland Heights have always been regarded as an important point to be held by us, andd General Couch's forces on the Susquehanna, were subject to his orders, and were directed to co-operate with him. At the same time Meade asked permission to withdraw a portion of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, leaving a detachment to guard Maryland Heights, to which Halleck replied: The garrison at Harper's Ferry is under your orders, you can increase or diminish it as you think circumstances justify. In addition to these re-inforcements, a large number of horses as remounts were forwarded b
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
eantime Ewell crossed the Potomac on the 15th, with two of his divisions and proceeded to Hagerstown, Maryland, while Jenkins's brigade of cavalry was sent to Chambersburg, to scour the country and gastown on the 24th, and Longstreet at the same time at Williamsport. The two columns united at Hagerstown, and proceeded thence to the neighborhood of Chambersburg, which was reached on the 27th, wher he set forward on the 22d, marching through the Cumberland Valley, and occupying successively Hagerstown, Greencastle, Chambersburg and Carlisle, making requisitions and securing supplies. He reachelieved, would have been altogether different. When Ewell was in occupation of Boonsboro and Hagerstown, for some days prior to the 22d, he could easily have turned east and occupied Frederick. It hostile force on that flank. The army moved rapidly, and on the 6th the main column reached Hagerstown, and a battery was sent on pickett with Anderson's division, and another ,with Lane's. Whil
Upperville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ere somewhat scattered over the large area covered by them, and the engagement was fought on his side chiefly by Fitz Lee's brigade. Captures were made by both sides, and the losses by each were severe. On the 19th, the fight was renewed at Middleburg, to which point Pleasanton had dispatched another force, taking Stuart in rear. A division of infantry reinforced Pleasanton, and Longstreet sent back a division to Snicker's Gap to assist Stuart, who was finally compelled to retire beyond Upperville. The fighting lasted several days. Pleasanton in his reports, claims to have penetrated several of the gaps in the Blue Ridge, but admits he met there no bodies of infantry, and the extent of the information imparted to Hooker was that the enemy's infantry was west of the Blue Ridge. On the 23rd, General Lee wrote to Mr. Davis, The attempts to penetrate the mountains have been successfully repelled by General Stuart with the cavalry. General Stuart, last night, was within a few miles
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
be seen that evening on the mountain side at Cashtown, by Buford's pickets, who advanced some milessburg, and the subsequent order to proceed to Cashtown or Gettysburg as circumstances might dictate,n the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following n on the morning of July 1st. On arriving at Cashtown, General Heth, who had sent forward Pettigrew corps moved on the 29th from Fayetteville to Cashtown, at the east base of South Mountain, where itrted from General Lee's plan in moving beyond Cashtown. He contends that this place and not Gettysb all against him. Ewell was directed towards Cashtown or Gettysburg, as circumstances might requirekless and unauthorized; had he stood still at Cashtown, he would have blocked the passage of Longstr to make it appear that Hill's advance beyond Cashtown was unauthorized, in the light of these facts, Rodes' division, moving in the direction of Cashtown, was turned to the left at Middletown, and it[6 more...]
Seminary hill (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
h's division when it left Marsh's Creek, hearing the firing, turned the head of the column to the left and marched it across the fields to the Cashtown road at Seminary Hill, riding on himself in advance. It was while observing the ground and giving directions where the approaching infantry should be posted that he was mortally derals massed in great force. Colonel Perrin, commanding McGowan's brigade, reports that the charge up the hill, which drove the enemy to his last position at Seminary Hill, was made without firing a shot. Here, he says, he received the most destructive musketry fire to which he had ever been exposed, and which for a moment stagge open field west of Gettysburg, another approach to Cemetery Heights was open besides that from the town, which seems to have been overlooked. Looking from Seminary Hill at that time across to Cemetery Heights, the confusion from the town was seen to extend to the Heights, and batteries could plainly be seen limbering up and ap
Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
miles; Pender's in rear of Heath's a short distance further; Anderson's at Fayetteville, seventeen miles; two divisions of Longstreet's corps, Hood and McLaws at Greenwood, fourteen miles; and Pickett's at Chambersburg, twenty-four miles. General Lee, writing from Greenwood on July 1st to Imboden, who with a force of cavalry had maGreenwood on July 1st to Imboden, who with a force of cavalry had marched from West Virginia and was about joining the army, directs him to relieve Pickett, who was to move forward to Greenwood, and giving further directions says, You will at the same time have an opportunity of organizing your troops, refreshing them for a day or two and getting everything prepared for active operations in the fieGreenwood, and giving further directions says, You will at the same time have an opportunity of organizing your troops, refreshing them for a day or two and getting everything prepared for active operations in the field, for which you will be speedily wanted. Send word to General Pickett at this place to-morrow, which is eight miles from Chambersburg, the hour you will arrive there, in order that he may be prepared to move on your arrival. My headquarters for the present will be at Cashtown, east of the mountains. This letter does not indica
Manchester (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ailroad (Northern Central). Early's demonstration towards York, caused Meade's inclination to the right, but when informed from Washington that the pressure towards the Susquehanna was relaxed, he swung his right wing forward so as to touch Manchester, and his line then connected that place with Taneytown. On the 30th of June, Reynolds was again assigned to the command of the first, third and eleventh corps, constituting the left wing of the army. On the evening of that day, two divisioncorps, left Union Mills the morning of the 1st, and marching by Hanover, reached the ground about 8 A. M., on the 2d, covering a distance of twenty-six miles, and took position on the right near Rock Creek. Sedgwick with the sixth corps left Manchester on the 1st, and after a march of over thirty miles, was on the ground by the afternoon of the 2d, and one division supported the fifth corps in its engagement after 5 P. M. Two brigades of Birney's division of the third corps reached the ground
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
& Ohio Railroad further delayed him, so that Westminster was not reached until the evening of the 29th, where a slight skirmish occurred. The next morning, June 30th, the march was resumed in a direct line for Hanover, Pa. Here a considerable body of cavalry was encountered, which had to be disposed of, and sending the wagon trains and prisoners by way of Jefferson, Dover was reached on the morning of July 1st. Here Stuart learned that Early had marched his division in the direction of Shippensburg, and after a short rest, he moved on to Carlisle, which was held by a considerable body of militia. During the night of July 1st, he learned through dispatches from General Lee, that the army was at Gettysburg, and had been engaged on that day. The late Judge James D. Watters, of the Third Judicial Circuit of the State of Maryland, then in Harry Gilmor's command, has related to the writer more than once, his thrilling experience connected with carrying these dispatches. He was order
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ing the canal, Stuart resumed his march on the 28th. He met, as anticipated, large wagon trains, much of which was captured, with a number of prisoners, which added greatly to the length of his column and impeded his march. The destruction of stores, and the tracks of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad further delayed him, so that Westminster was not reached until the evening of the 29th, where a slight skirmish occurred. The next morning, June 30th, the march was resumed in a direct line for Hanover, Pa. Here a considerable body of cavalry was encountered, which had to be disposed of, and sending the wagon trains and prisoners by way of Jefferson, Dover was reached on the morning of July 1st. Here Stuart learned that Early had marched his division in the direction of Shippensburg, and after a short rest, he moved on to Carlisle, which was held by a considerable body of militia. During the night of July 1st, he learned through dispatches from General Lee, that the army was at Gettysb
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