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ets, stopping sometimes before Willard's Hotel, where we had all found quarters. From my window I saw the office of the New York Herald, and near it the ghastly advertisement of an agency for embalming and forwarding the bodies of those who had fallen in the fight or who had perished by fever. William Henry Channing, nephew of the great Channing, and heir to his spiritual distinction, had left his Liverpool pulpit, deeply stirred by love of his country and enthusiasm in a noble cause. On Sundays, his voice rang out, clear and musical as a bell, within the walls of the Unitarian church. I went more than once with him and Mr. Clarke to visit camps and hospitals. It was on the occasion of one of these visits that I made my very first attempt at public speaking. I had joined the rest of my party in a reconnoitring expedition, the last stage of which was the headquarters of Colonel William B. Greene, of the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. Our friend received us with a warm wel
the doorkeeper whether there was any one in the hall. Oh, yes! a good many, he said. I entered and found quite a numerous company. My procedure was very simple,—a prayer, the reading of a hymn, and a discourse from a Scripture text. I had prepared this last with considerable care, and kept the manuscript of it beside me, but my memory enabled me to give the substance of what I had written without referring to the paper. My impression is that I spoke in this way on some five or six Sundays. Of all these discourses, I remember only the last one, of which the text was, I am persuaded that neither height nor depth, nor any other creature, etc. The attendance was very good throughout, and I cherished the hope that I had sown some seed which would bear fruit thereafter. I remember that our own poet, Thomas William Parsons, happening to be in London at this time, suggested to me a poem of Mrs. Stowe's as very suitable to be read at one of my Sunday services. It was the one begin
money was raised. The greater part of this was devoted to the purchase of provisions and clothing for the families of the Cretan combatants, which were known to be in a very destitute condition. In the spring of 1867 Dr. Howe determined to visit Greece, in order to have a nearer view of the scene of action. I accompanied him, and with us went two of our daughters, Julia Romana, remembered as the wife of Michael Anagnos, and Laura, now Mrs. Henry Richards, known as the author of Captain January. We received gratifying attentions from the wealthy Greeks of London. Passing thence to the continent, we were soon in Rome, where I enjoyed some happy days with my beloved sister, Louisa, then, after some years of widowhood, the wife of Luther Terry. Dr. Howe hastened on to Athens, taking with him our eldest daughter. I followed him later, bringing the younger one with me. Arriving at the Piraeus, we were met by a messenger, who told us that Dr. Howe had just escaped a serious da
January 1st (search for this): chapter 4
caps of the same fur. They were much admired at the time. Among the festivities of old New York, the observance of New Year's Day held an important place. In every house of any pretension, the ladies of the family sat in their drawing-rooms, arrathe ladies upon the number received. Girls at school vexed each other with emulative boasting: We had fifty calls on New Year's Day. Oh! but we had sixty-five. This perfunctory performance grew very tedious by the time the calling hours were ended it to be replaced by hot coffee. We were rather chagrined at this prohibition, but his will was law. I recall a New Year's Day early in the thirties, on which a yellow chariot stopped before our door. A stout, elderly gentleman descended from disagreeable in various ways. This offense against good manners led to the discontinuance, by common consent, of the New Year's receptions. A younger sister of my mother, named Louisa Corde Cutler, was one of the historic beauties of her time.
January 1st (search for this): chapter 17
mited to a short walk in the neighborhood of his house. His strength constantly diminished during the summer, yet he retained his habits of early rising and of active occupation, as well as his interest in matters public and private. He returned to Boston in the autumn, and seemed at first benefited by the change. He felt, however, and we felt, that a change was impending. On Christmas day he was able to dine with his family, and to converse with one or two invited guests. On the first of January he said to an intimate friend: I have told my people that they will bury me this month. This was merely a passing impression, as in fact he had not so spoken to any of us. On January 4th, while up and about as usual, he was attacked by sudden and severe convulsions, followed by insensibility; and on January 9th he breathed his last, surrounded by his family, and apparently without pain or consciousness. Before the end Laura Bridgman was brought to his bedside, to touch once more the
January 1st (search for this): chapter 22
neral, John, father of Mrs. William B. Astor, 64. Association for the Advancement of Women, the, founded, 386; distribution of its congresses, 392. Astor, John Jacob, Washington Irving at the house of, 27; calls on Mrs. Howe's father on New Year's Day, 32; wedding gift of, to his granddaughter, 65; fondness for music, 74; anecdotes of, 75, 76. Astor, William B., his culture and education, 73. Astor, Mrs. William B. (Margaret Armstrong), her recollection of Mrs. Howe's mother, 5; desce prison, visit to, 108. Newport, Mrs. Howe spends a summer at the Cliff House there, 221; Dr. Howe buys an estate at, 238; Mrs. Howe writes her play there, 239; people who stayed at, 401, 402; the Town and Country Club of, formed, 405. New Year's Day, custom of visiting on, 31, 32. New York City, growth of, shown, 12, 13; first musical ventures in, 14, 15; its people of culture, 21-25; social events in, 29, 66; Bryant celebration at, 277-280; meetings in, to encourage the woman's peace
January 4th (search for this): chapter 17
is interest in matters public and private. He returned to Boston in the autumn, and seemed at first benefited by the change. He felt, however, and we felt, that a change was impending. On Christmas day he was able to dine with his family, and to converse with one or two invited guests. On the first of January he said to an intimate friend: I have told my people that they will bury me this month. This was merely a passing impression, as in fact he had not so spoken to any of us. On January 4th, while up and about as usual, he was attacked by sudden and severe convulsions, followed by insensibility; and on January 9th he breathed his last, surrounded by his family, and apparently without pain or consciousness. Before the end Laura Bridgman was brought to his bedside, to touch once more the hand that had unlocked the world to her. She did so, weeping bitterly. A great mourning was made for Dr. Howe. Eulogies were pronounced before the legislature of Massachusetts, and resol
January 9th (search for this): chapter 17
He felt, however, and we felt, that a change was impending. On Christmas day he was able to dine with his family, and to converse with one or two invited guests. On the first of January he said to an intimate friend: I have told my people that they will bury me this month. This was merely a passing impression, as in fact he had not so spoken to any of us. On January 4th, while up and about as usual, he was attacked by sudden and severe convulsions, followed by insensibility; and on January 9th he breathed his last, surrounded by his family, and apparently without pain or consciousness. Before the end Laura Bridgman was brought to his bedside, to touch once more the hand that had unlocked the world to her. She did so, weeping bitterly. A great mourning was made for Dr. Howe. Eulogies were pronounced before the legislature of Massachusetts, and resolutions of regret and sympathy came to us from various beneficent associations. From Greece came back a touching echo of our s
ramatic defects. It did not, as they say, keep the stage. My next literary venture was a series of papers descriptive of a visit made to the island of Cuba in 1859, under the following circumstances. Theodore Parker had long intended to make this year one of foreign travel. He had planned a journey in South America, and Dr. Howe had promised to accompany him. The sudden failure of Parker's health at this time was thought to render a change of climate imperative, and in the month of February a voyage to Cuba was prescribed for him. In this, Dr. Howe willingly consented to accompany him, deciding also that I must be of the party. Our departure was in rough weather. George Ripley, formerly of Brook Farm and then of the New York Tribune, an early friend of Parker, came to see us off. My husband insisted somewhat strenuously upon my coming to table at the first meal served on board, as this would secure me a place for the entire voyage. I felt very ill, and Parker, who was sea
ony which she suffered in the interval between her husband's departure and the first authentic news received of the expedition. It was a year later than this that Dr. Howe was urged by parties interested to undertake a second visit to Santo Domingo, with the view of furthering the interests of the Samana Bay Company. He had been so much impressed with the beauty of the island that he wished me to share its enchantments with him. We accordingly set sail in a small steamer, the Tybee, in February of the year 1873. Our youngest daughter, Maud, went with us, and our party consisted of Maud's friend, Miss Derby, now Mrs. Samuel Richard Fuller, my husband's three nieces, and Miss Mary C. Paddock, a valued friend. Colonel Fabens, a man much interested in the prospects of the island, also embarked with us. The voyage was a stormy one, the seas being exceeding rough, and the steamer most uneasy in her action. After some weary days and nights, we cast anchor in the harbor of Puerta Plata
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