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ld not refrain from exclaiming, Oh, Cecilia, how you have improved! to which Mrs. Combe replied, Who could help improving when living with perfection? Dr. Howe and Mr. Combe sometimes visited the galleries in company, viewing the works therein contained in the light of their favorite theory. I remember having gone with them through the great sculpture hall of the Vatican, listening with edification to their instructive conversation. They stood for some time before the well-known head of Zeus, the contour and features of which appeared to them quite orthodox, according to the standard of phrenology. In this last my husband was rather an enthusiastic believer. He was apt, in judging new acquaintances, to note closely the shape of the head, and at one time was unwilling even to allow a woman servant to be engaged until, at his request, she had removed her bonnet, giving him an opportunity to form his estimate of her character or, at least, of her natural proclivities. In commo
ttacked, 236. Tiibingen, University of, confers a degree on Samuel Ward, Mrs. Howe's brother, 68. Turks, their devastation of Greece, 85. Tweedy, Edmund, 402. Tweedy, Mary, 402. Umberto, king of Italy, crowned, 424. Uncle Tom's Cabin, Mrs. Stowe's, 253. United States, Bank of, Jackson's refusal to renew charter of, 50; English sneer at, 17 Van de Weyer, Mr. Sylvain, Belgian minister to England, 93. Van de Weyer, Mrs. Sylvain, 92. Vatican, evening visit to, 129; head of Zeus in, 132. Via Felice, a poem, 200. Victor Emmanuel, his popularity and death, 423. Victoria, Queen, 93. Vienna, the Howes at, 118. Von Walther, Mme., 118. Voysey, Rev., Charles, sermon by, 330. Waddington, W. H., 410. Wade, Benjamin F., commissioner on the annexation of Santo Domingo, 181, 345. Wadsworth, William, of Geneseo, 104. Walcourt, Lord, visited by the Howes, 114, 115. Walcourt, Lady, 115. Wall Street, Samuel Ward in, 51; John Ward in, 55. Wallace, Hor
Yerrinton (search for this): chapter 9
d to some of us endless, the noise subsided, and Wendell Phillips, still in the glory of his strength and manly beauty, stood up before the house, and soon held all present spellbound by the magic of his speech. The clear silver ring of his voice cared conviction with it. From head to foot, he seemed aflame with the passion of his convictions. He used the simplest English, and spoke with such distinctness that his lowest tones, almost a whisper, could be heard throughout the large hall. Yerrinton, the only man who could report Wendell Phillips's speeches, once told my husband that it was like reporting chain lightning. On the occasion of which I speak, the unruly element was quieted once for all, and the further proceedings of the meeting suffered no interruption. The mob, however, did not at once abandon its intention of doing violence to the great advocate. Soon after the time just mentioned Dr. Howe attended an evening meeting, at the close of which a crowd of rough men ga
Rev., Eliza Tupper, takes part in the convention of woman ministers, 312. Willis, N. P., at the Bryant celebration, 278. Wilson, Henry, 178. Wines, Rev., Frederick, at the Prison Reform meetings, 340. Winkworth, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen, friends of peace, their hospitality. 330. Wolcott, Mrs. Henrietta L. T., her talk on waifs, 392; helps Mrs. Howe with the woman's department of a fair in Boston in 1882, 394. Woman suffrage, championed by Wendell Phillips, 157, 158; by John Weiss, 289; meeting in favor of, in Boston, 375; other efforts, 376; workers for it, 378; urged in Vermont, 380; legislative hearings upon, 381-384. Wood, Mrs., sings in New York: her voice, 15. Woods, Rev., Leonard, invites Mrs. Howe to contribute to the Theological Review, 44. Words for the Hour, Mrs Howe's second publication, 230. Wordsworth, William, the poet, the Howes' visit to, 115, 116. World's Own, The, a drama by Mrs. Howe, 230. Yerrinton, J. M. W., 156. Zenaide, Princess, 20.
retain the opinion which I then expressed. I ventured a timid remark regarding the great number of Greek derivatives used in our common English speech. Mr. Gladstone said very abruptly, How? What? English words derived from Greek? and almost Frightened Miss Muffet away. He was said to be habitually disputatious, and I thought that this must certainly be the case; for he surely knew better than most people how largely and familiarly we incorporate the words of Plato, Aristotle, and Xenophon in our everyday talk. Lord Houghton also took me one evening to a reception at the house of Mr. Palgrave. At a dinner given in our honor at Greenwich, I was escorted to the table by Mr. Mallock, author of The New Republic. I remember him as a young man of medium height and dark complexion. Of his conversation I can recall only his praise of the Church of Rome. William Black, the well-known romancer, took tea with me at my lodgings one afternoon. Here I also received Mr. Green, autho
William Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 2
are of a fine house on the Bowling Green, a region of high fashion in those days. In the summer mornings my nurse sometimes walked abroad with me, and showed me the young girls of our neighborhood, engaged with their skipping ropes. Our favorite resort was the Battery, where the flagstaff used in the Revolution was still to be seen. The fort at Castle Garden had already been converted into a pleasure resort, where fireworks and ices might be enjoyed. We were six children in all, yet Wordsworth's little maid would have reckoned us as seven, as a sister of four years had died shortly before my birth, leaving me her name and the dignity of eldest daughter. She was always mentioned in the family as the first little Julia. My two eldest brothers, Samuel and Henry Ward, were pupils at Round Hill School. The third, Francis Marion, named for the General, was my junior by fifteen months, and continued to be my constant playmate until, at the proper age, he joined the others at Roun
William Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 8
them. Our talk turning upon poetry in general, I remarked that Wordsworth appeared to be the only poet of eminence left in England. Beforehagrined at remembering the remark I had made in connection with Wordsworth. He probably supposed that I was ignorant of his literary rank, man, who was then at the height of his popularity. To criticise Wordsworth and to praise Byron were matters equally unpardonable in the Londturn a note was soon sent, inviting us to take tea that evening with Mr. and Mrs. Wordsworth. Our visit was a very disappointing one. TheMrs. Wordsworth. Our visit was a very disappointing one. The widowed daughter of our host had lost heavily by the failure of certain American securities. These losses formed the sole topic of conversation not only between Wordsworth and Dr. Howe, but also between the ladies of the family, my sister, and myself. The tea to which we had beene harassing conversation as long as we could. The only remark of Wordsworth's which I brought away was this: The misfortune of Ireland is tha
William Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 22
wcome, 235. Theatre, the, frowned down in New York, 15, 16. Thoreau, Henry D., Emerson's paper on, 290. Ticknor, Miss, Anna, in the Town and Country Club, 407. Ticknor, George, letter of introduction from, to Miss Edgeworth, 113; to Wordsworth, 115. Tolstoi, Count, Lyeff, his Kreutzer Sonata disapproved of, 17. Torlonia, a Roman banker, anecdote of, 27; ball given by, 123. Torlonia's Palace, 122, 128. Tormer, an artist, 127. Tourgenieff, the Russian novelist, 412. T 289; meeting in favor of, in Boston, 375; other efforts, 376; workers for it, 378; urged in Vermont, 380; legislative hearings upon, 381-384. Wood, Mrs., sings in New York: her voice, 15. Woods, Rev., Leonard, invites Mrs. Howe to contribute to the Theological Review, 44. Words for the Hour, Mrs Howe's second publication, 230. Wordsworth, William, the poet, the Howes' visit to, 115, 116. World's Own, The, a drama by Mrs. Howe, 230. Yerrinton, J. M. W., 156. Zenaide, Princess, 20.
Leonard Woods (search for this): chapter 5
ell, founder and principal of Round Hill School, at which my three brothers had been among his pupils. The school, a famous one in its day, was now finally closed. Our new guest was an accomplished linguist, and possessed an admirable power of imparting knowledge. With his aid, I resumed the German studies which I had already begun, but in which I had made but little progress. Under his tuition, I soon found myself able to read with ease the masterpieces of Goethe and Schiller. Rev. Leonard Woods, son of a well-known pastor of that name, was a familiar guest at my father's house. He took some interest in my studies, and at length proposed that I should become a contributor to the Theological Review, of which he was editor at that time. I undertook to furnish a review of Lamartine's Jocelyn, which had recently appeared. When I had done my best with this, Dr. Cogswell went over the pages with me very carefully, pointing out defects of style and arrangement. The paper attracte
Leonard Woods (search for this): chapter 22
Rev., Eliza Tupper, takes part in the convention of woman ministers, 312. Willis, N. P., at the Bryant celebration, 278. Wilson, Henry, 178. Wines, Rev., Frederick, at the Prison Reform meetings, 340. Winkworth, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen, friends of peace, their hospitality. 330. Wolcott, Mrs. Henrietta L. T., her talk on waifs, 392; helps Mrs. Howe with the woman's department of a fair in Boston in 1882, 394. Woman suffrage, championed by Wendell Phillips, 157, 158; by John Weiss, 289; meeting in favor of, in Boston, 375; other efforts, 376; workers for it, 378; urged in Vermont, 380; legislative hearings upon, 381-384. Wood, Mrs., sings in New York: her voice, 15. Woods, Rev., Leonard, invites Mrs. Howe to contribute to the Theological Review, 44. Words for the Hour, Mrs Howe's second publication, 230. Wordsworth, William, the poet, the Howes' visit to, 115, 116. World's Own, The, a drama by Mrs. Howe, 230. Yerrinton, J. M. W., 156. Zenaide, Princess, 20.
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