hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Samuel Gridley Howe 184 2 Browse Search
Theodore Parker 161 1 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 156 0 Browse Search
Maud Howe 128 0 Browse Search
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) 80 2 Browse Search
Julia Romana Howe 80 0 Browse Search
Samuel Ward 77 5 Browse Search
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) 74 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips 72 0 Browse Search
Ralph Waldo Emerson 68 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899. Search the whole document.

Found 198 total hits in 67 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
d. Mrs. Livermore, who was present on this occasion, expressed herself as much of my opinion, acknowledging the consistency of the demonstration, but declining to abide in the conclusion arrived at. My last recollection of speech with Mr. Longfellow is of an evening on which I lectured at his church in Germantown. He gave me a most hospitable reception, and I found it very pleasant to be his guest. To speak of my first impressions of Dr. F. H. Hedge, I must turn back to the autumn of 1841, when he delivered his first Phi Beta address at Harvard College. This was the summer already mentioned as having brought my first meeting with Dr. Howe. Commencement and Phi Beta in those days were held in the early autumn, and my sisters and I were staying at a cottage in Dorchester when we received an invitation from Mrs. Farrar, of hospitable memory, to pass the day at her house, with other guests, among whom Margaret Fuller was mentioned. It was arranged that I should go with Margar
Chapter 13: the Boston Radical Club: Dr. F. H. Hedge The Boston Radical Club appears to me one of the social developments most worthy of remembrance in the third quarter of the nineteenth century. From a published record of its meetings I gather that the first of them was held at the residence of Dr. Bartol in the autumn of the year 1867. I felt a little grieved and aggrieved at the time, in that no invitation had been sent me to be present on this occasion, but was soon consoled by a letter offering me membership in the new association, which, it may be supposed, I did not decline. The government of the club was of the simplest. Its meetings were held on the first Monday of every month, and most frequently at the house of Rev. John T. Sargent, though occasionally at that of Dr. Bartol. The master of the house usually presided, but Mrs. Sargent was always present and aided much in suggesting the names of the persons who should be called upon to discuss the essay of the day.
h birthday, Dr. Hedge joined with James Freeman Clarke in loving and reverent testimony to her unusual talents and noble character. I had the pleasure of twice hearing Dr. Hedge's admirable essay on Luther, which he first delivered at Arlington Street Church, and repeated, some years later, before the Town and Country Club of Newport, R. I. But my crowning recollection of him, and perhaps of the crowning performance of his life, is of that memorable evening of anniversary week in the year 1886, when he made his exhaustive and splendid statement of the substance of the Unitarian faith. The occasion was a happy one. The Music Hall was filled with the great Unitarian audience furnished by Boston and its vicinity. George William Curtis was the president of the evening, and introduced the several speakers with his accustomed grace. He made some little pun on Dr. Hedge's name, and the noble speaker quietly stepped forward, with the fire of unquenchable youth in his eyes, with the bal
Francis E. Abbot (search for this): chapter 14
to be called in question. I felt great support in the assurance that he would always uphold the right, and in the right spirit. It was in the strength of this assurance that I betook myself to Mrs. Sargent's house one evening, to hear Mr. Francis E. Abbot expound his peculiar views to a little company of Unitarian ministers. Mr. Abbot, in the course of his remarks, exclaimed: The Christian Church is blind! it is blind! Mr. Wasson replied: We cannot allow Brother Abbot to think that he isMr. Abbot, in the course of his remarks, exclaimed: The Christian Church is blind! it is blind! Mr. Wasson replied: We cannot allow Brother Abbot to think that he is the only one who sees. I remember of this evening that I came away much impressed with the beautiful patience of the older gentlemen. I must mention one more occasion at the Radical Club. I can remember neither the topic nor the reader of the essay, but the discussion drifted, as it often did, in the direction of woman suffrage, and John Weiss delivered himself of the following utterance: When man and woman shall meet at the polls, and he shall hold out his hand and say to her, Give me yo
ew or presentation was the general sense of the dignity of human character and of its affinity with things divine, which always gave the master tone to the discussions. The first essay read before the Radical Club of which I have any distinct recollection was by Rev. John Weiss, and had for its title, The Immanence of God. It was highly speculative in character, and appeared to me to suggest many insoluble questions, among others, that of the origin of the sensible world. Lord and Lady Amberley, who were present, expressed to me great admiration of the essay. The occasion was rendered memorable by the beautiful presence of Lucretia Mott. Other discourses of John Weiss I remember with greater pleasure, notably one on the legend of Prometheus, in which his love for Greece had full scope, while his vivid imagination, like a blazing torch, illuminated for us the deep significance of that ancient myth. I remember, at one of these meetings, a rather sharp passage at arms betw
Michael Angelo (search for this): chapter 14
Protestant divine, Athanase Coquerel, spoke of religion and art in their relation to each other. After a brief but interesting review of classic, Byzantine, and mediaeval art, M. Coquerel expressed his dissent from the generally received opinion that the Church of Rome had always been foremost in the promotion and patronage of the fine arts. The greatest of Italian masters, he averred, while standing in the formal relations with that church, had often shown opposition to its spirit. Michael Angelo's sonnets revealed a state of mind intolerant of ecclesiastical as of other tyranny. Raphael, in the execution of a papal order, had represented true religion by a portrait figure of Savonarola. Holbein and Rembrandt were avowed Protestants. He considered the individuality fostered by Protestantism as most favorable to the development of originality in art. With these views Colonel Higginson did not agree. He held that Christianity had reached its highest point under the dispensat
Thomas G. Appleton (search for this): chapter 14
ne, and the hymns which Mr. Longfellow himself contributed to the repertoire of the denomination are deeply religious in tone; and yet I must think that among Unitarians of thirty or more years ago he was held to be something of a skeptic. Thomas G. Appleton was speaking of him in my presence one day, and said, He asked me whether I could not get along without the idea of a personal God. I replied, No, you—— ——. Appleton shook his fist, and was very vehement in his expression; but his indiAppleton shook his fist, and was very vehement in his expression; but his indignation had reference to Mr. Longfellow's supposed opinions, and not at all to his character, which was esteemed of all men. I myself was present when he read his essay on Law before the Radical Club. Of this I especially recall a rather elaborate argument against the popular notion of a directing and overruling Providence. He supported his statement by the imagined story of a shipwreck or railroad disaster, in which some would escape injury, while others quite as worthy might be killed or
C. A. Bartol (search for this): chapter 14
he Boston Radical Club appears to me one of the social developments most worthy of remembrance in the third quarter of the nineteenth century. From a published record of its meetings I gather that the first of them was held at the residence of Dr. Bartol in the autumn of the year 1867. I felt a little grieved and aggrieved at the time, in that no invitation had been sent me to be present on this occasion, but was soon consoled by a letter offering me membership in the new association, which, it may be supposed, I did not decline. The government of the club was of the simplest. Its meetings were held on the first Monday of every month, and most frequently at the house of Rev. John T. Sargent, though occasionally at that of Dr. Bartol. The master of the house usually presided, but Mrs. Sargent was always present and aided much in suggesting the names of the persons who should be called upon to discuss the essay of the day. The proceedings were limited to the reading and discussion o
Buckminster (search for this): chapter 14
imit and bound of truth. The few Americans who had studied in real earnest in Germany brought back with them the wide sweeping besom of the Kantian method, and much besides. This showed the positive assumptions of the old school to have no such foundation of absolute truth as had been conceded to them. Under their guidance men had presumed to measure the infinite by their own petty standard, and to impose upon the Almighty the limits and necessities with which they had hedged the way of their fellow-men. God could not have mercy in any way other than that which they felt bound to prescribe. His wisdom must coincide with their conclusions. His charity must be as narrow as their own. Those who could not or would not acquiesce in these views were ruled outside of the domain of Christendom. Had it not been for Channing, Freeman, Buckminster, and a few others in that early day, they would have been as sheep without a shepherd. The history is well known. I need not repeat it here.
William Henry Channing (search for this): chapter 14
rothingham, John Weiss, Colonel Higginson, Benjamin Peirce, William Henry Channing, C. C. Everett, and James Freeman Clarke. It was a glad suhe meetings of such men as James Freeman Clarke, Dr. Hedge, William Henry Channing, and Wendell Phillips was a sufficient earnest of the catholief, Limitations, Representation, and How to Secure it. William Henry Channing was one of the bright lights of the Radical Club, a man of of the value of the spoken as compared with the written word led Mr. Channing to speak always or mostly without a manuscript. It was much to till under the weight of this painful impression when I saw William Henry Channing coming towards me, and detained him for a moment's speech. thing ten miles away with a blunderbuss. I was always glad of Mr. Channing's presence on occasions on which matters of faith were likely toe ruled outside of the domain of Christendom. Had it not been for Channing, Freeman, Buckminster, and a few others in that early day, they wo
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...