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Ralph Waldo Emerson (search for this): chapter 14
rned. Among the speakers mentioned are Ralph Waldo Emerson, Dr. Hedge, David A. Wasson, O. B. Frotd the speaker. It came from Kate Field. Mr. Emerson had a brief connection with the Radical Cluthe Prophet of New England. In remembering Mr. Emerson, we should analyze his works sufficiently ttures of the ideal which we are to follow. Mr. Emerson objected strongly to newspaper reports of te an agency in the great church universal. Mr. Emerson's principal objection to the reports was thd among its speakers. I remember hearing Mr. Emerson, in his discourse on Henry Thoreau, relate of view did not appear to have entered into Mr. Emerson's thoughts. Upon this principle, which of ore Parker once said to me, I do not consider Emerson a philosopher, but a poet lacking the accomplbering. There is something of the vates in Mr. Emerson. The deep intuitions, the original and sta prose. I was once surprised, in hearing Mr. Emerson talk, to find how extensively read he was i
Athanase Coquerel (search for this): chapter 14
t sanction its use. On hearing this, Mr. Clarke broke in. Let Mr. Weiss answer for himself, he said with some vehemence of manner. If in his pulpit he prayed in the name of Christ, and did not believe in what he said, it was John Weiss that lied, and not one of us. The dear minister afterwards asked me whether he had shown any heat in what he said. I replied, Yes, but it was good heat. Another memorable day at the club was that on which the eminent French Protestant divine, Athanase Coquerel, spoke of religion and art in their relation to each other. After a brief but interesting review of classic, Byzantine, and mediaeval art, M. Coquerel expressed his dissent from the generally received opinion that the Church of Rome had always been foremost in the promotion and patronage of the fine arts. The greatest of Italian masters, he averred, while standing in the formal relations with that church, had often shown opposition to its spirit. Michael Angelo's sonnets revealed a
Lucretia Mott (search for this): chapter 14
ne to the discussions. The first essay read before the Radical Club of which I have any distinct recollection was by Rev. John Weiss, and had for its title, The Immanence of God. It was highly speculative in character, and appeared to me to suggest many insoluble questions, among others, that of the origin of the sensible world. Lord and Lady Amberley, who were present, expressed to me great admiration of the essay. The occasion was rendered memorable by the beautiful presence of Lucretia Mott. Other discourses of John Weiss I remember with greater pleasure, notably one on the legend of Prometheus, in which his love for Greece had full scope, while his vivid imagination, like a blazing torch, illuminated for us the deep significance of that ancient myth. I remember, at one of these meetings, a rather sharp passage at arms between Mr. Weiss and James Freeman Clarke. Mr. Weiss had been declaiming against the insincerity which he recognized in ministers who continue to us
Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 14
Beta in those days were held in the early autumn, and my sisters and I were staying at a cottage in Dorchester when we received an invitation from Mrs. Farrar, of hospitable memory, to pass the day at her house, with other guests, among whom Margaret Fuller was mentioned. It was arranged that I should go with Margaret to the church in which the morning meeting would be held. I had never even heard of Dr. Hedge, but I listened to him with close attention, and can still recall the steely ring os given was La Joie fait Peur. As it proceeded, Dr. Hedge said to me, What a wonderful people these French are! They have put passion enough into this performance to carry our war through to a successful termination. Dr. Hedge had known Margaret Fuller well in her youth and his own. His judgment of her was perhaps more generous than hers of him, as indicated in her criticism just quoted of his discourse, namely, that it occupied high ground for middle ground. In truth, the two were very u
Prometheus (search for this): chapter 14
n was by Rev. John Weiss, and had for its title, The Immanence of God. It was highly speculative in character, and appeared to me to suggest many insoluble questions, among others, that of the origin of the sensible world. Lord and Lady Amberley, who were present, expressed to me great admiration of the essay. The occasion was rendered memorable by the beautiful presence of Lucretia Mott. Other discourses of John Weiss I remember with greater pleasure, notably one on the legend of Prometheus, in which his love for Greece had full scope, while his vivid imagination, like a blazing torch, illuminated for us the deep significance of that ancient myth. I remember, at one of these meetings, a rather sharp passage at arms between Mr. Weiss and James Freeman Clarke. Mr. Weiss had been declaiming against the insincerity which he recognized in ministers who continue to use formulas of faith which have ceased to correspond to any real conviction. The speaker confessed his own short
John T. Sargent (search for this): chapter 14
t decline. The government of the club was of the simplest. Its meetings were held on the first Monday of every month, and most frequently at the house of Rev. John T. Sargent, though occasionally at that of Dr. Bartol. The master of the house usually presided, but Mrs. Sargent was always present and aided much in suggesting theMrs. Sargent was always present and aided much in suggesting the names of the persons who should be called upon to discuss the essay of the day. The proceedings were limited to the reading and discussion of a paper, which rarely exceeded an hour in length. On looking over the list of essayists, I find that it includes the most eminent thinkers of the day, in so far as Massachusetts is concerat support in the assurance that he would always uphold the right, and in the right spirit. It was in the strength of this assurance that I betook myself to Mrs. Sargent's house one evening, to hear Mr. Francis E. Abbot expound his peculiar views to a little company of Unitarian ministers. Mr. Abbot, in the course of his remar
F. H. Hedge (search for this): chapter 14
t. To speak of my first impressions of Dr. F. H. Hedge, I must turn back to the autumn of 1841, ng would be held. I had never even heard of Dr. Hedge, but I listened to him with close attention,ground. Many years after this time, I asked Dr. Hedge what Margaret could have meant by this sayino care a great deal about some ministers. Dr. Hedge then mischievously reminded me of my speech stered the cumbrous and difficult language. Dr. Hedge's last removal was to Cambridge, whither he war through to a successful termination. Dr. Hedge had known Margaret Fuller well in her youth to make their usual calls. A sister of his, Dr. Hedge said, was the only one of those ladies who cd passed alone upon a mountain in Scotland. Dr. Hedge more than once said to me, Margaret experienccustomed grace. He made some little pun on Dr. Hedge's name, and the noble speaker quietly steppeests upon it still. It is well known that Dr. Hedge received the most important part of his educ[17 more...]
Charles Sprague (search for this): chapter 14
a cottage in Dorchester when we received an invitation from Mrs. Farrar, of hospitable memory, to pass the day at her house, with other guests, among whom Margaret Fuller was mentioned. It was arranged that I should go with Margaret to the church in which the morning meeting would be held. I had never even heard of Dr. Hedge, but I listened to him with close attention, and can still recall the steely ring of his voice, and the effect of his clear-cut sentences. The poem was given by Charles Sprague; and of this I only remember that in one couplet, speaking of the wonderful talents which parents are apt to recognize in their children, he asked whence could have come those ordinary men and women whom we all know. This question provoked some laughter on the part of the audience. As we left the church, I asked Margaret whether she had not found Dr. Hedge's discourse very good. She replied, Yes; it was high ground for middle ground. Many years after this time, I asked Dr. Hedge wh
slations. I should say that his intellectual pasture ground had been largely within the domain of belles-lettres proper. He was a man of angelic nature, pure, exquisite, just, refined, and human. All concede him the highest place in our literary heaven. First class in genius and in character, he was able to discern the face of the times. To him was entrusted not only the silver trump of prophecy, but also that sharp and two-edged sword of the Spirit with which the legendary archangel Michael overcomes the brute Satan. In the great victory of his day, the triumph of freedom over slavery, he has a record not to be outdone and never to be forgotten. A lesser light of this time was the Rev. Samuel Longfellow. I remember him first as of a somewhat vague and vanishing personality, not much noticed when his admired brother was of the company. This was before the beginning of his professional career. A little later, I heard of his ordination as a Unitarian minister from Rev. Edw
John Weiss (search for this): chapter 14
Emerson, Dr. Hedge, David A. Wasson, O. B. Frothingham, John Weiss, Colonel Higginson, Benjamin Peirce, William Henry Chann Club of which I have any distinct recollection was by Rev. John Weiss, and had for its title, The Immanence of God. It was utiful presence of Lucretia Mott. Other discourses of John Weiss I remember with greater pleasure, notably one on the legof these meetings, a rather sharp passage at arms between Mr. Weiss and James Freeman Clarke. Mr. Weiss had been declaiming Mr. Weiss had been declaiming against the insincerity which he recognized in ministers who continue to use formulas of faith which have ceased to correspon its use. On hearing this, Mr. Clarke broke in. Let Mr. Weiss answer for himself, he said with some vehemence of mannere of Christ, and did not believe in what he said, it was John Weiss that lied, and not one of us. The dear minister afterwaas it often did, in the direction of woman suffrage, and John Weiss delivered himself of the following utterance: When man a
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