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Norwich (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
truth, it hardly deserved to succeed, for all he aims at is to substitute some milder form of death, thus virtually conceding the principle of persecution for opinions in all its extent. In 1579, W. Hamont, a plough-wright, of Hetherset, near Norwich, underwent the same frightful sentence. The heretical opinions laid to his charge, as reported by Mr. Locke, See Mr. Locke's Letters to Limborch, Oct. 7, 1699. are evidently such a distortion and exaggeration of Unitarianism as might be expected from violent and prejudiced judges under such circumstances. In 1583, John Lewis was burnt at Norwich for denying the deity of Christ. Some years after, two other persons suffered at the same place for blasphemy, by which term there is every reason to believe we are to understand some form of Unitarianism. In the following reign of James I. two persons suffered in the same cause. In 1611, Bartholomew Legatt, called an Arian, said to have been well versed in the scriptures, and a man
Roberta (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nder that this circumstance alone should be thought to afford a strong prima facie evidence of the tendency of these great men to the profession of tenets which have been so intimately associated with their leading and distinctive principle. The Socinianism of Falkland rests on the testimony of Aubrey, who wrote his life, in which he styles him the first Socinian in England; having been converted by the perusal of the first copy of the Fratres Poloni which was brought into this country. Hales's celebrated tract on Schism is chiefly derived from Socinus; and the works of Chillingworth frequently betray a familiarity with the Polish writers. His well-known letter to Dr. Sheldon, in which he argues the question of subscription in a most clear and unanswerable manner, on principles which admit of no refutation or dispute, assigns the Athanasian Creed, among other insurmountable obstacles to his subscribing the Articles of the English church, and partaking by that means of the emolum
Lichfield (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
ar as they are intelligible or credible, shew him to have been rather a believer in the simple humanity of Christ. and Anabaptist, and eight pestilent heresies besides, some of which are contradictory to each other, before Dr. Neile, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. He was burnt at Lichfield, April 11 About this time (says Fuller) a Spanish Arian being condemned to die, was, notwithstanding, suffered to linger on his life in Newgate, where he ended the same. Indeed, such burning of heretLichfield, April 11 About this time (says Fuller) a Spanish Arian being condemned to die, was, notwithstanding, suffered to linger on his life in Newgate, where he ended the same. Indeed, such burning of heretics much startled common people, pitying all in pain, and prone to asperse justice itself with cruelty, because of the novelty and hideousness of the punishment. Wherefore King James politicly preferred that heretics hereafter, though condemned, should silently and privately waste themselves away in the prison, rather than to grace them and amuse others with the solemnity of a public execution, which in popular judgments usurped the honour of a persecution. See Fuller's Church History of Br
Jesus Christ (search for this): chapter 2
aptists openly or covertly denied the deity of Christ. Of these some adopted the Arian sentiment, oh the Baptists, in their general persuasion of Christ being not a God, but a creature. She appears burnt for some extravagant notions concerning Christ, but was looked on as a person fitter for Bedlthat God the Father was the only God, and that Christ was not very God, was committed to the flames d the doctrine of the Trinity and the Deity of Christ. The rudeness and violence of this conduct in was burnt at Norwich for denying the deity of Christ. Some years after, two other persons suffereden rather a believer in the simple humanity of Christ. and Anabaptist, and eight pestilent heresiesral rights of man, and on that liberty wherein Christ hath made him free. Nevertheless, there can ber indications that the denial of the deity of Christ was a growing opinion, though it might not as rship,—namely, the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. We may add, that, on whatever minor po[2 more...]
Acontii Stratagemata Satanae (search for this): chapter 2
the great business is with the understanding. This cannot be affected by menaces or the most engaging allurements. They cannot make that which before appeared to be true to appear false, how much soever a man may desire it. But if this cannot be done, and a heretic, however earnestly he may wish it, cannot quit his heresy but by conviction of stronger argument against it, why should you importune and solicit the miserable man to lie, and thereby more offend both God and man. Acontii Stratagemata Satanae; as quoted in Lindsey's Historical View, p. 75. Acontius was a native of Trent in Italy; he was originally bred up to the legal profession, and afterwards spent most of his life in courts, engaged for the most part in laborious occupations. Having embraced the Protestant faith, he quitted his country and settled in England, where, under the protection of Queen Elizabeth, he obtained some employment connected with fortifications, for which his skill in mathematics eminently f
erfectly well founded. Though the matter has of late been occasionally disputed, there seems to be no good reason to doubt that the Society of Friends, commonly called Quakers, in this early period of their history, did not make an open profession of the doctrine of the Trinity; at all events, they did not make the profession of this or any other tenet not to be found in the scripture an essential requisite to admission into their community. Their most eminent and distinguished writer, W. Penn, in his Sandy Foundation Shaken, has given as clear a view of the pure Unitarian doctrine, and as able an examination of many of the texts commonly adduced in support of the opposite system, as is any where to be found. The monthly meeting at Philadelphia, in their correspondence with George Keith (an active heresiarch, who had been endeavouring to sow divisions among them, and who, having afterwards seceded, was ordained a clergyman of the established church), declare their determination
Archdeacon Philpot (search for this): chapter 2
professed principles, and with the right of individual judgment which they asserted and exercised, which marked its exhibition by the leading reformers. Even the flames of persecution directed against themselves did not check the vehemence of their animosity against those who had gone further in the same road, and pursued their own avowed principles to their natural, and, as we think, necessary consequences. Of this a very remarkable and curious instance is recorded in the case of Archdeacon Philpot, who signalized himself by indecent and insulting behaviour towards some of his fellow-prisoners under the Marian persecution, who denied the doctrine of the Trinity and the Deity of Christ. The rudeness and violence of this conduct in such circumstances displeased many, even in those times, and he accordingly attempted to vindicate himself in a little tract, entitled An Apology of John Philpot, written for spitting upon an Arian; with an Invective against Arians, the very natural Ch
e state, as to be invested with power which they may be tempted to abuse, in seeking to lord it over the consciences of men!—With good and religious reason (says Milton, in his admirable discourse Of true religion, heresy, Schism, and Toleration ) all Protestant churches, with one consent, maintain these two points as the main prssity in their practical application to a spirit of free inquiry and mutual toleration for which that age was by no means prepared. It is thought by some, that Milton was even at this period what it is now no longer a matter of doubt that he at length became; but it does not appear that there is any direct evidence for this, nontious regard for strict accuracy of statement which does him honour, retracts the inference he had previously deduced from this passage as to the Unitarianism of Milton, an inference, says he, in which I was certainly mistaken. He does not assign the reasons which induced him to doubt the correctness of his former conclusions; b
ntiment with the Baptists, in their general persuasion of Christ being not a God, but a creature. She appears to have been a zealous reformer, and particularly active in promoting the diffusion of the Scriptures; which, having access to the court, she was at pains to disperse in secret among the ladies of distinction who resorted there. For Arianism (as it is called), and some not very intelligible nicety about the incarnation, this excellent person was persecuted to death by Cranmer and Latimer. When the tender-hearted young king for some time refused to sign the warrant for her execution, Cranmer undertook to argue the matter with him; and when, at last, he yielded, the king told him, with tears in his eyes, that if he did wrong, since it was in submission to his authority, he must answer to God for it. This noble-minded martyr to the truth, who, whether right or wrong in her opinions, displayed a spirit of which the world was not worthy, in times of unexampled and formidable
Paradise Regained (search for this): chapter 2
of thoughts at once Awakened in me swarm, while I consider What from within I feel myself, and hear What from without comes often to my ears, Ill sorting with my present state compared! When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good, myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things; therefore above my years The law of God I read, and found it sweet. Paradise Regained, book i., 196-207. Mr. Lindsey, in his History of the Unitarian Doctrine, with a conscientious regard for strict accuracy of statement which does him honour, retracts the inference he had previously deduced from this passage as to the Unitarianism of Milton, an inference, says he, in which I was certainly mistaken. He does not assign the reasons which induced him to doubt the correctness of his former conclusions; but we now know that they were perfectly well founded. Though th
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