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Unitarian (search for this): chapter 4
the Hague, to whom our author published a reply. Martin returned to the charge; but Mr. Emlyn, thinking that the argument was exhausted, was contented, as he well might, to leave his antagonist in possession of the field. There can be no doubt that the series of tracts of which we have now given a short account, had a considerable effect in keeping up the public attention to the Trinitarian controversy, and in promoting a more extensive diffusion, under one modification or another, of Unitarian sentiments, especially among those who then began to be called (or to call themselves) by way of distinction, the liberal dissenters. And he lived to see a very marked and considerable change in this respect, from the time when he seemed almost to stand alone and unfriended to bear the brunt of persecution in its most formidable shape. Nevertheless, for some reasons not very clearly explained, there seems to have been a sort of jealousy, which prevented his admission to many pulpits amon
f all. To such sad derision do some bold disposers of God Almighty expose him, as if they thought him, and had a mind to teach others that he is, altogether such as themselves! Are these the venerable mysteries of Christianity? of which I find not one word in holy writ; and therefore they must answer for the shame done to Christianity hereby, who have dared by such strained artifices to distort and abuse holy scripture, that they may impose these violent absurdities upon the gospel. In 1707 our author printed two tracts; one entitled The Supreme Deity of God the Father demonstrated, against Dr. Sherlock; and the other A Vindication of the Bishop of Gloucester (Dr. Fowler) from the Charge of Heresy brought against him by Dr. Sherlock. In these tracts, which are written with great smartness, he very dexterously sets against each other the two opposite parties of Trinitarians, sometimes called the Realists and the Nominalists, who were at that time engaged in a very animated contr
ch were equally his guides in prosperity, while all men spake well of him, and his consolation and effectual support in the period of adversity and persecution. Others have gone through more severe bodily sufferings, but none have displayed in their conduct and their sentiments more of the spirit of Him who, when he was reviled, reviled not again. Mr. Emlyn's tracts, the greater part, of which have been enumerated in the preceding memoir, were collected and republished in two volumes, in 1746, with a life of the author by his son, Sollom Emlyn, Esq., who was bred to the legal profession, in which he attained considerable eminence. Besides these, a posthumous volume was published of sermons, which are of a character to induce the judicious reader to wish that a more copious selection had been made. Note.—Mr. W. Manning was one of the venerable two thousand whose names were immortalized in the recollection of all true lovers of religious liberty on Bartholomew's day, 1662. He w
Stamford, in Lincolnshire, in the year 1663. His parents, though they statedly attended the worship of the established church, were friendly to the principles of the Nonconformists; and accordingly, even at that period, when such a destination held out no flattering prospect, and might lead to bonds and imprisonment, they did not hesitate to devote their son to the Christian ministry in that connexion. For this purpose, after the usual preparatory course of grammar learning, he was sent, in 1678, to an academical institution conducted by a Mr. Shuttleworth, at Sulby, in Northamptonshire. For a short time he was admitted at Emanuel College, Cambridge, and was afterwards transferred to the academy of Mr. Doolittle, in the neighbourhood of London. Here he had greater advantages in the access to books, &c.; but there is reason to think that he was more indebted to his own personal exertions and private studies than to the instructions he received. His tutors appear to have been worthy
that Christ is to be considered as our substitute, bearing the punishment due to our sins from vindictive justice; but still there is a degree of confusion arising from the unnecessary introduction of this phraseology, and one is almost inclined to suspect a sort of lurking wish by the use of familiar terms commonly understood in an orthodox sense, to beguile some into an acceptance of the doctrine recommended, who would have been startled by the exhibition of it in an undisguised form. In 1710, a remarkable tract appeared from Mr. Emlyn's pen, entitled, The previous Question relating to Baptism. Before entering upon the controversy between the advocates of infant and adult baptism, it appears necessary first to settle the question, What reason we have for supposing that baptism under any form was prescribed as an ordinance of perpetual obligation, to be practised not on converts merely, but on the offspring of Christian parents? Mr. Emlyn, though disposed on the whole to agree w
June 14th, 1703 AD (search for this): chapter 4
no legal toleration, but were only connived at) were resolved to have him prosecuted, and with this view procured a warrant from the Chief Justice, Sir Richard Pyne, to seize the author and his books. The Chief Justice was at first disposed to refuse bail, but afterwards consented, and two sufficient persons were bound in £ 800 for his appearance. The indictment, after having been three several times altered before it could be finally settled, occasioned the trial to be postponed till June 14, 1703. On that day, before the court sat, Mr. Emlyn was apprised by an eminent counsel that he would not be permitted to speak freely, but that it was determined to run him down like a wolf, without law, or game; and he soon found that this was not said without sufficient reason. Six or seven bishops were present, including the Archbishops of Armagh and Dublin, who took their seats upon the bench. If, says Mr. E., they had used arguments with me, or had informed the court how unfit a jury o
February, 1711 AD (search for this): chapter 4
gain. Mr. Emlyn's tracts, the greater part, of which have been enumerated in the preceding memoir, were collected and republished in two volumes, in 1746, with a life of the author by his son, Sollom Emlyn, Esq., who was bred to the legal profession, in which he attained considerable eminence. Besides these, a posthumous volume was published of sermons, which are of a character to induce the judicious reader to wish that a more copious selection had been made. Note.—Mr. W. Manning was one of the venerable two thousand whose names were immortalized in the recollection of all true lovers of religious liberty on Bartholomew's day, 1662. He was ejected from Middleton, in the county of Suffolk. In Palmer's Non-conformist's Memorial, he is described as a man of great abilities and learning, but he fell into the Socinian principles, to which he adhered till his death, which was in February, 1711. Descendants of this gentleman are still respected members of several of our churches
t all wonderful to him that others should think differently. While therefore, even with respect to those disputed points on which his own opinions are most decided, such a one would readily offer the right hand of fellowship to those who had conscientiously adopted a different sentiment,—in this case, almost above all others, he would refrain from expressing any opinion so positively as to imply that, if others do not agree with him, it must be the effect of improper bias or prejudice. In 1715, Mr. Emlyn entered the field of biblical criticism with an able and learned view of the argument against the genuineness of the text of the three heavenly witnesses (1 John v. 7). This was answered by a Mr. Martin, pastor of a French church at the Hague, to whom our author published a reply. Martin returned to the charge; but Mr. Emlyn, thinking that the argument was exhausted, was contented, as he well might, to leave his antagonist in possession of the field. There can be no doubt that
Thomas Emlyn was born at Stamford, in Lincolnshire, in the year 1663. His parents, though they statedly attended the worship of the established church, were friendly to the principles of the Nonconformists; and accordingly, even at that period, when such a destination held out no flattering prospect, and might lead to bonds and imprisonment, they did not hesitate to devote their son to the Christian ministry in that connexion. For this purpose, after the usual preparatory course of grammar learning, he was sent, in 1678, to an academical institution conducted by a Mr. Shuttleworth, at Sulby, in Northamptonshire. For a short time he was admitted at Emanuel College, Cambridge, and was afterwards transferred to the academy of Mr. Doolittle, in the neighbourhood of London. Here he had greater advantages in the access to books, &c.; but there is reason to think that he was more indebted to his own personal exertions and private studies than to the instructions he received. His tu
e academy of Mr. Doolittle, in the neighbourhood of London. Here he had greater advantages in the access to books, &c.; but there is reason to think that he was more indebted to his own personal exertions and private studies than to the instructions he received. His tutors appear to have been worthy and conscientious, but narrow-minded men, of no superior talent or compass of thought. He seems, however, to have speedily acquired reputation as a young man of acquirement and promise; for, in 1683, when only twenty years of age, he became chaplain to the Countess of Donegal, who then resided in London, and the following year went over with her family to Belfast in Ireland, where she was shortly afterwards married to Sir W. Franklin. Here he continued for some years in his capacity of chaplain, with a liberal salary, and was treated with great respect and distinction. Sir W. Franklin, who had a large property in the west of England, offered to present him to a considerable living in
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