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Great Salkeld (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
George Benson Was descended from a good family, who resided at Great Salkeld, in the county of Cumberland, where he was born September 1, 1699. His parents were pious, worthy persons, and zealous Nonconformists, having suffered considerably in this cause in the troubled times of the preceding generation; and they had the satisfaction to see several of a numerous family grow up and distinguish themselves not only in support of the same principles, but in the graces of a Christian life. George Benson was soon remarked for a seriousness of temper, and a disposition to study, which induced his parents to devote him to the Christian ministry; and for this purpose, after having passed through the usual course of grammar learning, he was sent to the academy kept by Dr. Dixon, of Whitehaven, already mentioned as having had the honour to number Taylor of Norwich, among its alumni. Here, however, he continued only about a year, after which he removed to the University of Glasgow. His f
Canterbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
ng and practising these; shewing the danger of trusting to any other expedients for obtaining the favour of God, and the blessedness of heaven, without personal holiness and obedience. A method of preaching not improper for convincing, converting, and edifying the hearers, especially when enforced by a suitable practice. (Memoir, p. XIII.) In 1747, Dr. Benson printed a volume of Sermons on several important Subjects. A letter which he received from Dr. Herring, the then Archbishop of Canterbury, in acknowledgment of a presentation copy, accompanied with congratulations on his recent elevation to the primacy, has been preserved, and merits insertion, as a model of that liberal and truly Christian spirit which we could wish to find in all stations, and more especially in one of such high dignity and extensive influence. Reverend Sir,—I cannot satisfy myself with having sent a cold and common answer of thanks for your volume of most excellent and useful sermons. I do it in thi
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
so as to render them instrumental to their progress in religious knowledge and all other graces of the Christian character. Whatever difficulties or discouragements in other ways they may have to encounter, may they ever be thankful to a kind Providence, which has protected them from many snares and perils with which others have to contend in the full exercise of that liberty wherewith Christ hath made them free! In 1742, Mr. Benson was a second time married, to Mary, daughter of Mr. Williesides that only, of wearing a name to which you, by your learning, have done honour. I can only say for myself, that I have a sincere desire to do all the good which my abilities will capacitate me for in the station in which it has pleased Providence to place me; and a sincere delight to see virtue and religion defended in an age which so much wants it by able hands. And no one can be more ready than myself to acknowledge how much, upon this account, we are indebted to the learned labours
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nce, and join in supporting its true interest and honour. No times ever called more loudly upon Protestants for zeal, and unity, and charity. I am, Rev. Sir, your assured friend, Thomas Cantuar. Another letter, in the same spirit, from the author's namesake, Dr. Benson, Bishop of Gloucester, is given by Dr. Amory, and is inserted here, as illustrating the sort of intercourse which was then permitted between church dignitaries and dissenting ministers of eminence. Berry Street, Westminster, Jan. 10, 1749. Sir,—I received, at my coming to town upon Saturday last, what you are pleased to style a small, but must allow me to esteem a very valuable, present,—your Paraphrase and Notes on the seven Catholic Epistles. I have not yet had time to peruse them; but I could not, till I had, delay to return my thanks for the great favour which you have done me, and to which I wish I could think myself entitled upon any of the other accounts you mention, besides that only, of wearing
Whitehaven (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
ding generation; and they had the satisfaction to see several of a numerous family grow up and distinguish themselves not only in support of the same principles, but in the graces of a Christian life. George Benson was soon remarked for a seriousness of temper, and a disposition to study, which induced his parents to devote him to the Christian ministry; and for this purpose, after having passed through the usual course of grammar learning, he was sent to the academy kept by Dr. Dixon, of Whitehaven, already mentioned as having had the honour to number Taylor of Norwich, among its alumni. Here, however, he continued only about a year, after which he removed to the University of Glasgow. His family appear to have been orthodox, and he himself was brought up in Calvinistic principles, which, however, he abandoned at an early period in the course of his preparatory studies. Indeed, he does not appear at any time to have considered himself as bound down to the profession of a system of
Southwark (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
rocure favours from God; not by working a change in the Deity, who will always do what is best; but by producing such a change for the better in man, as will render it best and fittest for the Deity to distinguish the pious and humble suppliant with instances of his particular favour. In 1726 he married Mrs. Elizabeth Hills, widow, with whom he lived very happily for fourteen years. In 1729 he received and accepted an invitation to become minister of a congregation in King John's Court, Southwark, the duties of which station he discharged with great acceptance and satisfaction for eleven years. The admirable success which had attended Mr. Locke's endeavours to apply the principles of just and rational interpretation in his excellent commentary on five of St. Paul's Epistles, had often inspired a wish that some person similarly qualified would continue the work on a similar plan, and in the same enlightened and liberal spirit. We have already seen that Mr. Peirce, in the latter
Chertsey (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
language of scripture, however, is founded on this supposition, in order to give such an impression as the human mind, especially at that early stage of its development to which the Scripture history chiefly refers, can most readily comprehend of the wisdom and steadiness of the course of Divine Providence. About the close of the year 1721, Mr. Benson came to London, and having been examined and approved by several of the most eminent Presbyterian ministers, he began to preach, first at Chertsey, and afterwards in London. By the recommendation of Dr. Calamy, he afterwards went to Abingdon, in Berkshire, and settled as minister of a dissenting congregation there, with whom he continued for seven years, diligently employed in studying the sacred writings, and labouring to instruct and improve the people under his care. During his stay at Abingdon, he preached and published three serious practical discourses, addressed to young people, which were well received. But of these he afte
Gloucester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
ess of spirit are out of countenance; when we breathe the benign and comfortable air of liberty and toleration; and the teachers of our common religion make it their business to extend its essential influence, and join in supporting its true interest and honour. No times ever called more loudly upon Protestants for zeal, and unity, and charity. I am, Rev. Sir, your assured friend, Thomas Cantuar. Another letter, in the same spirit, from the author's namesake, Dr. Benson, Bishop of Gloucester, is given by Dr. Amory, and is inserted here, as illustrating the sort of intercourse which was then permitted between church dignitaries and dissenting ministers of eminence. Berry Street, Westminster, Jan. 10, 1749. Sir,—I received, at my coming to town upon Saturday last, what you are pleased to style a small, but must allow me to esteem a very valuable, present,—your Paraphrase and Notes on the seven Catholic Epistles. I have not yet had time to peruse them; but I could not, til
St. Peter (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Introduction to the New Testament; assuming that the apostles, and they alone, were so far furnished with a full and complete scheme of what they were to teach concerning the Christian doctrine, as to be empowered to authenticate any writing, or give it a title to rank as canonical Christian scripture. If this be the proper criterion of an inspired writing, it becomes necessary, in order to establish the authority of two of the Gospels, to assume that Mark gives, in fact, the testimony of St. Peter, with whom he is understood to have been chiefly connected, and that Luke's narrative is confirmed by the apostolic authority of St. Paul. These assumptions may by some be thought somewhat arbitrary and gratuitous; and it may not appear very obvious why it should be considered necessary to seek for any other authority, in the Gospel of Luke for example, than that to which he himself lays claim, when he tells us, that it seemed good to him also, having traced every thing from the first exa
Norwich (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
s family grow up and distinguish themselves not only in support of the same principles, but in the graces of a Christian life. George Benson was soon remarked for a seriousness of temper, and a disposition to study, which induced his parents to devote him to the Christian ministry; and for this purpose, after having passed through the usual course of grammar learning, he was sent to the academy kept by Dr. Dixon, of Whitehaven, already mentioned as having had the honour to number Taylor of Norwich, among its alumni. Here, however, he continued only about a year, after which he removed to the University of Glasgow. His family appear to have been orthodox, and he himself was brought up in Calvinistic principles, which, however, he abandoned at an early period in the course of his preparatory studies. Indeed, he does not appear at any time to have considered himself as bound down to the profession of a system of human formation, but to have endeavoured, from the first, to derive his r
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