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John Emerson (search for this): chapter 14
ch a single love story runs, troublous, but with a happy ending. In ‘The Immortals,’ Mrs. Lowe celebrates heroes and friends that have gone from sight. Charlotte Bronte, Mrs. Browning, Chatterton, Shelley represent the English poets; Lowell, Emerson, Whittier, and E. R. Sill, the Americans; Channing and Brooks and Charles Lowe, her husband, the ministers; to say nothing of the several friends commemorated, dearer than any stranger. Let us choose a few stanzas from ‘Sleepy Hollow,’ written on the occasion of Emerson's funeral:— They bore him up the aisle, His white hands folded meekly on his breast; He had the very smile He wore the night he gently sank to rest. The words of love were said, We prayed and sang together; all was done; And then the way they led Along the street, the people following on. We covered him with green— He loved the hemlock branches and the pine,— And there he lay, serene, And yet not he, not there the spark divine. Be thou not over sad, Dear a
Mary A. Pillsbury (search for this): chapter 14
Literary men and women of Somerville. By David Lee Maulsby. [concluded.] Three persons remain to be briefly considered. Mrs. Mary A. Pillsbury, the daughter of Edwin Leathe, and connected by blood with the Weston family of Reading and the Brooks family of Medford, was born in Lynnfield in 1838. She was married in 1863 to L. B. Pillsbury. Of the four children, Harry N. Pillsbury, it is safe to say, is known as a chess player throughout America and Europe. Mrs. Pillsbury early began to write poems, ‘for her own amusement and for the gratification of her friends.’ In 1888, shortly before her death, a volume of her pieces was published, called ‘The Legend of the Old Mill, and Other Poems.’ The title poem is a story of Mallet's old wind-mill, still looking down upon us from the Nathan Tufts Park, perhaps the most venerable landmark of our city. An Acadian maiden, fleeing from one who would have tarnished her honorable name, takes refuge, disguised as a man, in the old mill,
he rain; Then 'round the hill, to greet again The purple day before it falls, And breathe the clover on the plain. Such bits from Nature occur on the background of country life. ‘The Quilting’ and ‘The Husking’ are two companion poems, through both of which a single love story runs, troublous, but with a happy ending. In ‘The Immortals,’ Mrs. Lowe celebrates heroes and friends that have gone from sight. Charlotte Bronte, Mrs. Browning, Chatterton, Shelley represent the English poets; Lowell, Emerson, Whittier, and E. R. Sill, the Americans; Channing and Brooks and Charles Lowe, her husband, the ministers; to say nothing of the several friends commemorated, dearer than any stranger. Let us choose a few stanzas from ‘Sleepy Hollow,’ written on the occasion of Emerson's funeral:— They bore him up the aisle, His white hands folded meekly on his breast; He had the very smile He wore the night he gently sank to rest. The words of love were said, We prayed and sang toget
Edwin Leathe (search for this): chapter 14
Literary men and women of Somerville. By David Lee Maulsby. [concluded.] Three persons remain to be briefly considered. Mrs. Mary A. Pillsbury, the daughter of Edwin Leathe, and connected by blood with the Weston family of Reading and the Brooks family of Medford, was born in Lynnfield in 1838. She was married in 1863 to L. B. Pillsbury. Of the four children, Harry N. Pillsbury, it is safe to say, is known as a chess player throughout America and Europe. Mrs. Pillsbury early began to write poems, ‘for her own amusement and for the gratification of her friends.’ In 1888, shortly before her death, a volume of her pieces was published, called ‘The Legend of the Old Mill, and Other Poems.’ The title poem is a story of Mallet's old wind-mill, still looking down upon us from the Nathan Tufts Park, perhaps the most venerable landmark of our city. An Acadian maiden, fleeing from one who would have tarnished her honorable name, takes refuge, disguised as a man, in the old mill,
o on between the tangled walls Of shining twigs, that drop the rain; Then 'round the hill, to greet again The purple day before it falls, And breathe the clover on the plain. Such bits from Nature occur on the background of country life. ‘The Quilting’ and ‘The Husking’ are two companion poems, through both of which a single love story runs, troublous, but with a happy ending. In ‘The Immortals,’ Mrs. Lowe celebrates heroes and friends that have gone from sight. Charlotte Bronte, Mrs. Browning, Chatterton, Shelley represent the English poets; Lowell, Emerson, Whittier, and E. R. Sill, the Americans; Channing and Brooks and Charles Lowe, her husband, the ministers; to say nothing of the several friends commemorated, dearer than any stranger. Let us choose a few stanzas from ‘Sleepy Hollow,’ written on the occasion of Emerson's funeral:— They bore him up the aisle, His white hands folded meekly on his breast; He had the very smile He wore the night he gently sank to
Katherine B. W. Libby (search for this): chapter 14
The poems in this volume include rhymed anecdotes, verses suggested by the children, reflections of natural beauty, and thoughts on religious themes. Mrs. Katherine B. W. Libby, who died within a year (March 7, 1902), was born and educated in Chelsea, but lived in Somerville since shortly after her marriage. Mrs. Libby was remMrs. Libby was remarkable for her patriotism, as well as her predilection for poetry. A ‘Daughter of the Revolution,’ a member of this society, and of several social and philanthropic bodies, she bore her part in practical affairs. Her writing, however, was to her of supreme importance: she would drop instantly whatever she might be doing when a e away. Ye bells, thy silver tongues These tidings sweetly tell, And from the wind-harp's throbbing strings Doth joy's glad anthem swell. It is clear that Mrs. Libby had a feeling for metrical language, and also, in her best work, a measure of that essential impulse which makes poetry what it is. A still more recent loss
obbing strings Doth joy's glad anthem swell. It is clear that Mrs. Libby had a feeling for metrical language, and also, in her best work, a measure of that essential impulse which makes poetry what it is. A still more recent loss is that of Mrs. Lowe, who died May 9, 1902. Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe for many years was known as one of the most public-spirited women in this city, active in all good wcrk. Her literary productions include a ‘Memoir’ of her husband, Rev. Charles Lowe, who from 1859 to 1865 was pastor of the First Unitarian church here, and afterward Secretary of the American Unitarian Society. It is said that, in the midst of her numerous deeds of practical beneficence, Mrs. Lowe yet cherished the name of poet above all others. She has left four volumes of verse, and one longer poem unpublished. It is safe to say that, of the published books, ‘The Olive and the Pine’ and ‘The Immortals’ contain the poems by which Mrs. Lowe will be remembered. The former include
desolate ocean seen from the shore at Beverly. Here is a German lesson, inspiring the young teacher with a hopeless passion for his fair pupil. There is a sympathetic portrayal of a sick woman, waiting patiently from day to day, and from season to season, for the death that is so long in coming, but that comes at last. Glimpses of natural beauty relieve the sadness of such scenes. Take, for example, ‘The Silent Way,’ describing a woodland path so thickly guarded that neither the winds of March nor the midsummer sun, nor even November frost, can enter. But go at sweet Midsummer night; The pines with showers are spicy yet, The birches tremble at the set Of sun, in pale, transfigured light, And low the savin clusters wet. Go on between the tangled walls Of shining twigs, that drop the rain; Then 'round the hill, to greet again The purple day before it falls, And breathe the clover on the plain. Such bits from Nature occur on the background of country life. ‘The Quilting’ and
Literary men and women of Somerville. By David Lee Maulsby. [concluded.] Three persons remain to be briefly considered. Mrs. Mary A. Pillsbury, the daughter of Edwin Leathe, and connected by blood with the Weston family of Reading and the Brooks family of Medford, was born in Lynnfield in 1838. She was married in 1863 to L. B. Pillsbury. Of the four children, Harry N. Pillsbury, it is safe to say, is known as a chess player throughout America and Europe. Mrs. Pillsbury early began to write poems, ‘for her own amusement and for the gratification of her friends.’ In 1888, shortly before her death, a volume of her pieces was published, called ‘The Legend of the Old Mill, and Other Poems.’ The title poem is a story of Mallet's old wind-mill, still looking down upon us from the Nathan Tufts Park, perhaps the most venerable landmark of our city. An Acadian maiden, fleeing from one who would have tarnished her honorable name, takes refuge, disguised as a man, in the old mill,
May 9th, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 14
l board, Hang up the mistletoe. Unveil thy blushing face! Awake, glad Easter day! An angel from the sepulchre Hath rolled the stone away. Ye bells, thy silver tongues These tidings sweetly tell, And from the wind-harp's throbbing strings Doth joy's glad anthem swell. It is clear that Mrs. Libby had a feeling for metrical language, and also, in her best work, a measure of that essential impulse which makes poetry what it is. A still more recent loss is that of Mrs. Lowe, who died May 9, 1902. Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe for many years was known as one of the most public-spirited women in this city, active in all good wcrk. Her literary productions include a ‘Memoir’ of her husband, Rev. Charles Lowe, who from 1859 to 1865 was pastor of the First Unitarian church here, and afterward Secretary of the American Unitarian Society. It is said that, in the midst of her numerous deeds of practical beneficence, Mrs. Lowe yet cherished the name of poet above all others. She has left four
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