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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
iver to worthy causes. Blessed in his domestic relations, he was singularly happy in his family and home. He was a tender husband and parent, akind and thoughtful brother, and a loyal kinsman. His sterling business qualities and the unusual correctness of his life naturally brought him to positions of trust and responsibility. He was a member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, and served on its important committees and as one of its board of trustees. He was a director in the Bunker Hill National Bank; a member of the New England HistoricGenea-logical and the Somerville Historical Societies, and of the Merchants' Club of Boston; a director in the Central Club Association of Somerville; and a member of the Standing Committee and an earnest supporter of the First Congregational (Unitarian) Church of Somerville, with which he had always been affiliated. At these various directing boards he was a regular attendant, a conscientious worker, a wise counsellor, and a safe guardian.
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
nt of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host. He was keenly alive to the amusements and pleasantries of life, and yet he seemed to preserve the simple and sober ways of a Puritan ancestry. He impressed all who met him in his many walks of life as a sincere,
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
estown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host. He was keenly alive to the amusements and pleasantries of life, and yet he seemed to preserve the simple and sober ways of a Puritan ancestry. He impressed all who met him in his many walks of life as a sincere, just, and
Mary Belle (search for this): chapter 4
, was named. His maternal grandfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host. He was keenly alive to the amusements and pleasantries of life, and yet he seemed to preserve the simple and sober ways of a Puritan ancestry
9, 1904, at his residence, 144 Summer street, Somerville. He had been ill with grippe for three weeks, and was convalescing, when cerebral symptoms supervened, which rapidly brought on a fatal termination. Mr. Tufts was the youngest child of Nathan, Jr., and Mary Jane (Fitz) Tufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whom the Nathan Tufts park, surrounding the old mill and Powder House, was named. His a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host.
Albert Clifford Tufts (search for this): chapter 4
Albert Clifford Tufts. By Edward C. Booth. Albert Clifford Tufts died March 19, 1904, at his residence, 144 Summer street, Somerville. He had been ill with grippe for three weeks, and was convalescing, when cerebral symptoms supervened, which Albert Clifford Tufts died March 19, 1904, at his residence, 144 Summer street, Somerville. He had been ill with grippe for three weeks, and was convalescing, when cerebral symptoms supervened, which rapidly brought on a fatal termination. Mr. Tufts was the youngest child of Nathan, Jr., and Mary Jane (Fitz) Tufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whomMr. Tufts was the youngest child of Nathan, Jr., and Mary Jane (Fitz) Tufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whom the Nathan Tufts park, surrounding the old mill and Powder House, was named. His maternal grandfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his natiTufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whom the Nathan Tufts park, surrounding the old mill and Powder House, was named. His maternal grandfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business
el Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host. He was keenly alive to the amusements and pleasantries of life, and yet he seemed to preserve the simple and sober ways of a Puritan ancestry. He impressed all who met him in his many w
Edward C. Booth (search for this): chapter 4
Albert Clifford Tufts. By Edward C. Booth. Albert Clifford Tufts died March 19, 1904, at his residence, 144 Summer street, Somerville. He had been ill with grippe for three weeks, and was convalescing, when cerebral symptoms supervened, which rapidly brought on a fatal termination. Mr. Tufts was the youngest child of Nathan, Jr., and Mary Jane (Fitz) Tufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whom the Nathan Tufts park, surrounding the old mill and Powder House, was named. His maternal grandfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business ti
William Wallace (search for this): chapter 4
dfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business till his last illness. Mr. Tufts married, April 19, 1893, Mary Belle, the daughter of William Wallace and Anna (Moses) Cotton, of Portsmouth,, N. H., who, with a son, Nathan, a boy of six years, survives him. An elder child, Elizabeth, lived to the age of eighteen months. Though somewhat retiring in general company, Mr. Tufts was fond of the society of his kindred and friends, and was a frequent and generous host. He was keenly alive to the amusements and pleasantries of life, and yet he seemed to preserve the simple and sober ways of a Puritan ancestry. He impressed all who met hi
Mary Jane (search for this): chapter 4
Albert Clifford Tufts. By Edward C. Booth. Albert Clifford Tufts died March 19, 1904, at his residence, 144 Summer street, Somerville. He had been ill with grippe for three weeks, and was convalescing, when cerebral symptoms supervened, which rapidly brought on a fatal termination. Mr. Tufts was the youngest child of Nathan, Jr., and Mary Jane (Fitz) Tufts, and was born in the house in which he died, September 11, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Tufts, of Somerville, for whom the Nathan Tufts park, surrounding the old mill and Powder House, was named. His maternal grandfather was Abel Fitz, a prominent merchant of Charlestown, and early resident of Somerville. Mr. Tufts was educated in the public schools of his native city. On his graduation from the high school in 1883, he entered the counting room of his father and brother, grain merchants on Warren bridge, Charlestown. He became a partner on the death of his father in 1887, and was active in the business ti
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