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Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
s ever been written, and I should not presume to write one; but I am asked to give you this evening a sketch of John S. Edgerly and his home on Winter Hill. Mr. Edgerly was born in Meredith, N. H., not far from Winnepesaukee, November 30, 1804. He was the son of Samuel Edgerly, who married Betsey Smith, January, 1794. There were twelve children in the family. In the earlier generation, his first ancestor who came to this country was Thomas Edgerly, before 1665. He landed probably at Portsmouth, and was received as an inhabitant of Oyster Bay, township of Dover. In the generation that followed there was much trouble with the Indians, and in some cases they were massacred by them. Like many another young man before and since, when he had reached the years of discretion he was ambitious to see what the larger life of the city of Boston had for him; and I judge he left home for that purpose when about twenty years of age. I presume he had the struggle most people do to find the ri
Dover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ked to give you this evening a sketch of John S. Edgerly and his home on Winter Hill. Mr. Edgerly was born in Meredith, N. H., not far from Winnepesaukee, November 30, 1804. He was the son of Samuel Edgerly, who married Betsey Smith, January, 1794. There were twelve children in the family. In the earlier generation, his first ancestor who came to this country was Thomas Edgerly, before 1665. He landed probably at Portsmouth, and was received as an inhabitant of Oyster Bay, township of Dover. In the generation that followed there was much trouble with the Indians, and in some cases they were massacred by them. Like many another young man before and since, when he had reached the years of discretion he was ambitious to see what the larger life of the city of Boston had for him; and I judge he left home for that purpose when about twenty years of age. I presume he had the struggle most people do to find the right thing to do. But he became a stonecutter (physical labor was not c
Oyster Bay, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
write one; but I am asked to give you this evening a sketch of John S. Edgerly and his home on Winter Hill. Mr. Edgerly was born in Meredith, N. H., not far from Winnepesaukee, November 30, 1804. He was the son of Samuel Edgerly, who married Betsey Smith, January, 1794. There were twelve children in the family. In the earlier generation, his first ancestor who came to this country was Thomas Edgerly, before 1665. He landed probably at Portsmouth, and was received as an inhabitant of Oyster Bay, township of Dover. In the generation that followed there was much trouble with the Indians, and in some cases they were massacred by them. Like many another young man before and since, when he had reached the years of discretion he was ambitious to see what the larger life of the city of Boston had for him; and I judge he left home for that purpose when about twenty years of age. I presume he had the struggle most people do to find the right thing to do. But he became a stonecutter (phy
Meredith (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
only to live to accomplish our ideal of personal work, but also to help others to think high thoughts, to do brave deeds, and live a noble and blameless life. Unfortunately, the youth seldom see these Reports. Except for mention here and there of people and landmarks, I think no history of Somerville has ever been written, and I should not presume to write one; but I am asked to give you this evening a sketch of John S. Edgerly and his home on Winter Hill. Mr. Edgerly was born in Meredith, N. H., not far from Winnepesaukee, November 30, 1804. He was the son of Samuel Edgerly, who married Betsey Smith, January, 1794. There were twelve children in the family. In the earlier generation, his first ancestor who came to this country was Thomas Edgerly, before 1665. He landed probably at Portsmouth, and was received as an inhabitant of Oyster Bay, township of Dover. In the generation that followed there was much trouble with the Indians, and in some cases they were massacred by t
Winter Hill (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
John S. Edgerly: and his home on Winter Hill By Helen M. Despeaux I have seen published many memories of Somerville events so far from correct, I am the more willing to tell what I know to be true of my father's life. When the semi-centennial of Somerville was celebrated in 1892, it seemed to me that the mention of the first settlers of the place was far less than that of those who followed in the city's ranks. Having occasion to write to the late John S. Hayes about that time, I mentioned the fact to him, and in his reply he said: It has fallen to me to write a History of Somerville, and it is my full intention to put conspicuously to the front the men who made the city possible by their great interest in the town. Mr. Hayes was taken ill, and unable to carry out the task assigned him. We can forgive him our part in it, as he gave in the twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Somerville Public Library such a laudatory notice of my brother Edward Everett Edgerly, whose portrait han
Hillsboro (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
g man he ever knew of, desirous to learn, very energetic, and busy every moment. Be that as it may, I know he was well acquainted with Deacon and Mrs. Vinal, and they were the only ones from Charlestown present at the marriage of Mr. Edgerly at a little home in Boston over seventy years ago, from which house he moved, with his wife and two children, in 1836, to the house that he had bought on Winter Hill. Mrs. Edgerly was the daughter of Moses and Lydia Watts Woods, and was born in Hillsboro, N. H., May 1, 1807. There were nine children. Mr. Woods figured quite prominently in military affairs, and was colonel of the Ninth New Hampshire regiment. His father, Moses Woods, 1st, was one of the forty at Concord Bridge who took up arms against the soldiers of King George III, April 19, 1775, and fired the shot heard round the world. He later came with the regiment that marched to Roxbury March 4, 1776, and still later was first lieutenant in Colonel Samuel Bullard's regiment, that b
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nter Hill. Mrs. Edgerly was the daughter of Moses and Lydia Watts Woods, and was born in Hillsboro, N. H., May 1, 1807. There were nine children. Mr. Woods figured quite prominently in military affairs, and was colonel of the Ninth New Hampshire regiment. His father, Moses Woods, 1st, was one of the forty at Concord Bridge who took up arms against the soldiers of King George III, April 19, 1775, and fired the shot heard round the world. He later came with the regiment that marched to Roxbury March 4, 1776, and still later was first lieutenant in Colonel Samuel Bullard's regiment, that became part of the Northern army. Mr. and Mrs. Edgerly had three sons and five daughters: John Woods Edgerly, Annie E. W. Edgerly (now Mixer), Charles Brown Edgerly, Adine Franz Edgerly (afterwards Pratt), Helen Mar. Edgerly (now Despeaux), Edward Everett Edgerly, Madeline Lemalfa Edgerly, and Caroline Edgerly. The house is between the road to what is now Arlington and that to Medford. It
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
this evening a sketch of John S. Edgerly and his home on Winter Hill. Mr. Edgerly was born in Meredith, N. H., not far frowo children, in 1836, to the house that he had bought on Winter Hill. Mrs. Edgerly was the daughter of Moses and Lydia Wat It is hard to look back and imagine the streets about Winter Hill and other places so banked up with snow as to need a shond preach on Sunday. After about thirty years living on Winter Hill, two sons and two daughters having gone out into new homaway, but one son and family still remain at the foot of Winter Hill. Uncle Edmund Tufts, so-called, lived nearly opposite, it was the most spacious and social of all the homes on Winter Hill. It had been used previously by Mr. Charles Strickland,, the Spencers, and Sawyers, etc., etc. After leaving Winter Hill, Mr. Edgerly moved to East Somerville, where he.lived atld spot that our infancy and childhood so fondly knew on Winter Hill. There is an Edgerly schoolhouse on Cross street, Eas
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ed to Roxbury March 4, 1776, and still later was first lieutenant in Colonel Samuel Bullard's regiment, that became part of the Northern army. Mr. and Mrs. Edgerly had three sons and five daughters: John Woods Edgerly, Annie E. W. Edgerly (now Mixer), Charles Brown Edgerly, Adine Franz Edgerly (afterwards Pratt), Helen Mar. Edgerly (now Despeaux), Edward Everett Edgerly, Madeline Lemalfa Edgerly, and Caroline Edgerly. The house is between the road to what is now Arlington and that to Medford. It was built in 1805 by Colonel John Sweetser, and was called The Odin House, and as I have heard that it was formerly a tavern, I presume it was at that time. At some time later it was occupied by Dr. Samuel Parkman. From 1826 to 1830 it was occupied by the Hon. Edward Everett, and in 1836 Mr. Edgerly took possession. He always liked things on a large scale, which doubtless accounts for his buying so large a place; and after a few years the house had to be enlarged. Mr. Edgerly, thou
Samuel Adams (search for this): chapter 7
oney on it, but except in removing the front piazza and putting on a porch with a tower, there was not much change. There were lots of fine, pleasant neighbors, and the first I will mention is John C. Magoun, who, being a farmer, had time to be assessor and one of the overseers of the poor. He occupied both positions several years. He lived in the old Adams place, where his wife was born, married, and died, and one daughter and granddaughter still remain there. His wife had two brothers, Samuel Adams, who was always called Uncle Sammy, and another, Joseph Adams, who lived down the hill further, and was the father-in-law of Mr. Aaron Sargent, who is well known as the former treasurer of Somerville, previous to the time of our beloved and departed friend, Mr. John F. Cole. Mrs. Magoun had still another brother, Charles Adams, father of the distinguished singer. Mr. Magoun was a fine, pleasant looking man, and as I saw his photo yesterday, I could still see the face so benign, as
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