hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Seth Wyman 61 1 Browse Search
Joseph Phipps 44 0 Browse Search
Samuel Phipps 43 1 Browse Search
Philemon Russell 36 0 Browse Search
Samuel Gardner 32 0 Browse Search
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Samuel Kent 28 0 Browse Search
Charles D. Elliot 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Mortimer Hawes 26 0 Browse Search
James F. Whitney 26 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906. Search the whole document.

Found 127 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ecuted itself while General Butler remained in the department. It is my belief that General Butler spoke advisedly when he said there were more paroled rebel soldiers in New Orleans than there were Union troops within fifty miles of his headquarters, because he had caused a census to be taken, and was thus enabled to locate every man and woman in the city. The Thirteenth Maine was put to a cruel test by being placed, in our already weak physical condition, in the malarial swamps of Southern Louisiana, in mid-summer, and kept there for more than a year. And, alas! too, too many heroic souls sleep beneath the soil that once echoed to the tread of millions of human slaves. But we never forgot that we belonged to the Lord's Country—never forgot who we were, and what. Even when, one foggy night, Sentinel Swaney shot the quartermaster's mule because it would not obey his challenge to halt, it was credited to his vigilance. And when a soldier tumbled off the draw-bridge into the moat
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
the forts below New Orleans were captured, Ship Island was the only approach to the city held by U companies, and regimental headquarters, on Ship Island. These several transfers, you will noticthe regiment. Shortly after our arrival on Ship Island, I was detailed in the adjutant's office. d sentenced to spend her vacation months on Ship Island. The spirit of General Order No. 28 becamethe Seventy-fourth Regiment—headquarters at Ship Island. All surplus officers, including all the fthe company to which I had been assigned at Ship Island was under orders to proceed to Mobile Bay, ion. My orders directed me to proceed to Ship Island via New Orleans. On arriving at the latter, and if a boat comes in I will send you to Ship Island forthwith if I have nothing but a bale of hvice. Although my second tour of duty on Ship Island was of rather a sober character, yet we occs and prepare for muster-out. The sands of Ship Island were not watered with my tears. But when,
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and very recently by a regular army officer, who pronounced the Thirteenth Maine second to no regiment in the department. Until the forts below New Orleans were captured, Ship Island was the only approach to the
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
oth forts was trained for business. At this juncture H. B. M. S. S. Rinaldo rounded to, and with loud protests and threats (!) her commander demanded of the boarding officer by what authority he was fired upon. He was courteously informed by what authority, although he was already informed as regards General Butler's orders in general and particular. The Hartford, flying the admiral's flag, was amenable to this particular order. Luckily for this irate Englishman, he had level-headed New England men to deal with. Had we observed strictly the letter of our orders, the Rinaldo would have been knocked into kindling wood. The commander was kindly earned in regard to his future behavior while passing this outpost and I am sure that the boarding officer indulged in no ambiguous language. At this time the notable General Order No. 28 had been in force about four months, and had become of almost international importance. Rebels and their sympathizers, foreign as well as American, wer
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
son, and one to Quarantine Station, about five miles above the fort. A few days later two companies were ordered to Fort St. Philip, leaving two companies, and regimental headquarters, on Ship Island. These several transfers, you will notice, ca transferred to Fort Jackson, I was detailed as acting adjutant of the post. Later I served in the same capacity at Fort St. Philip and in New Orleans. The post—Forts Jackson and St. Philip—was commanded, for a short time, by Brigadier-General NSt. Philip—was commanded, for a short time, by Brigadier-General Neal Dow. Here altogether new responsibilities were thrust upon us. Vessels, and crafts of every description, passing up and down the river, were required by department orders to heave to and obtain the permission of the boarding officer before theyne of his own officers, and it was too late to make any change. I housed my disappointment and resumed my duties at Fort St. Philip. July 8 Port Hudson was annexed, in spite of my nonattendance at the ceremonies, and another chunk of conceit wa<
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
have been informed, are well up in these branches, and I have instructed the adjutant to make out an order detailing you, with your company, for this service. To have him whose fame as a battery commander was a household word throughout the United States (and the so-called Confederate States of America, as well) for my superior officer caused me to forget my Mobile Bay disappointment. On my first inspection I found two 100-pounder Parrott guns, and five eleven-inch Dahlgren guns, all mountedConfederate States of America, as well) for my superior officer caused me to forget my Mobile Bay disappointment. On my first inspection I found two 100-pounder Parrott guns, and five eleven-inch Dahlgren guns, all mounted in sand batteries, and all save the Parrotts practically unserviceable. As for ordnance stores, the post lacked almost everything. I immediately made out a requisition for such stores as I deemed essential, and referred it to the colonel, who said, The war will be over before your requisition will be filled. On the contrary, I replied, it will be filled by return boat, or Sherman will give me a cursing that will be heard in Washington. The first steamer from New Orleans brought every art
St. Phillip (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
nce of a Union Veteran By Levi Lindley Hawes (Continued.) About the middle of April General Butler learned that Farragut's fleet had crossed the bar and was ready to proceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and very recently by a re
Lake Pontchartrain (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
we occasionally sent expeditions to the Mississippi shore to afford protection to known Union men against bushwhackers, and to show the rebels generally that we were ever on the alert. As a matter of fact, we had reason to believe that we were liable to receive a visit from the rebels at any hour, day or night. July 8 brought the pay-master, and orders. One company was ordered to Fort Pike, on the Rigolets, and one to Fort Macomb, on Pass Chef Menteur, these being the entrances to Lake Pontchartrain. Three companies were ordered to Fort Jackson, and one to Quarantine Station, about five miles above the fort. A few days later two companies were ordered to Fort St. Philip, leaving two companies, and regimental headquarters, on Ship Island. These several transfers, you will notice, carried the entire regiment to guard all the water approaches to New Orleans, save the river above the city, and Farragut the Superb was competent to attend to that approach. According to the repeat
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e, of the First Louisiana Regiment, who desired an adjutant familiar with the duties of the office. By reason of lack of transportation, a week or two passed before I was able to report; and then I found the army all ready to move out towards Port Hudson. The colonel had been obliged to detail one of his own officers, and it was too late to make any change. I housed my disappointment and resumed my duties at Fort St. Philip. July 8 Port Hudson was annexed, in spite of my nonattendance atPort Hudson was annexed, in spite of my nonattendance at the ceremonies, and another chunk of conceit was knocked out of me. Previous to this date, several officers and enlisted men, disgusted at being cooped up in garrison, had sought and obtained promotion and transfer to other regiments. Let me say here, parenthetically, that at least two brigade commanders—regular army officers—made application to have the Thirteenth Maine Regiment assigned each to his brigade for the Port Hudson campaign. In August the regiment rallied around the flag in
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
us accomplished, chiefly by less than half a hundred black boys, and during a night as dark as their faces. That afternoon the engineer officer in charge of the work on the fort called on me and asked me if I was an engineer. I told him that I was simply an up-and-down, out-and-out Yankee; and that my chief occupation was growling at my ill luck. Yes, he said, I know you seem to think that you are a misfit here, but, judging from what I saw of your performance last night, I believe that Providence has placed you here; and if you will allow me, I think you had better stop grumbling. I didn't see you at the batteries, I said. Well, I took special pains that you shouldn't see me, he replied. But I have come to congratulate you on the handsome manner in which you have undone some of my work. It took me three weeks to roll one of those guns to the battery. You have dismounted and shipped the two guns in less than six hours, and the chief part of the work was done by night. With the
1 2 3 4 5