hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Seth Wyman 61 1 Browse Search
Joseph Phipps 44 0 Browse Search
Samuel Phipps 43 1 Browse Search
Philemon Russell 36 0 Browse Search
Samuel Gardner 32 0 Browse Search
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Samuel Kent 28 0 Browse Search
Charles D. Elliot 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Mortimer Hawes 26 0 Browse Search
James F. Whitney 26 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906. Search the whole document.

Found 127 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
in the volunteer service till the close of the war; that my desire for peace was so intense that I was ready and willing to fight for it. The temptation to yield to their several arguments was great, but I believe that I decided wisely. Shortly thereafter came orders consolidating the Ninety-first Regiment with the Seventy-fourth Regiment—headquarters at Ship Island. All surplus officers, including all the field officers of the Ninety-first Regiment, received an honorable discharge. Major Pike, on assuming command at Fort Macomb, told me that the company to which I had been assigned at Ship Island was under orders to proceed to Mobile Bay, where Admiral Farragut was making preparations to attack the forts. Glory! Hallelujah! I shouted. The astonished major said, What! are you that anxious to have your head knocked off? Oh, no, not that, I answered, but I have a consuming desire to lead these boys where we can get a wholesome whack at this edge of the diabolical rebellion.
rod, as the boys called Order No. 28, were again to be tested. The fact that our colonel was then on detached service led me to believe that the Thirteenth Maine was destined to remain on duty in New Orleans for an indefinite period. Lieutenant-Colonel Buck (late captain in our regiment), who had been assigned to the Twentieth Regiment Corps d'afrique, then stationed at Fort Macomb, had, a month or two before, without my knowledge, appointed me captain in his regiment. Having served so lon it seemed almost like disloyalty to withdraw from it. But I thought I saw a prospect of getting into more active service; therefore, with some misgiving, I finally accepted the commission and joined my company at Fort Macomb. The post commander (Buck) and all the officers of the four companies stationed here were promoted out of the Thirteenth Maine Regiment. Although we regarded ourselves as would-be fighters, we yet constituted a happy family. The Twentieth Regiment Corps d'afrique—so re
T. W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 11
ranger to me. I was the victim of a situation and a condition. I might have said O. K. at the outlook, but I didn't. I said nothing, but went to work. After a few days the colonel did me the honor to call on me and read me a letter from General T. W. Sherman, ordering him to detail an officer to act as ordnance and artillery officer. None of my old officers, he said, have any knowledge of ordnance or heavy artillery. You, I have been informed, are well up in these branches, and I have instr I immediately made out a requisition for such stores as I deemed essential, and referred it to the colonel, who said, The war will be over before your requisition will be filled. On the contrary, I replied, it will be filled by return boat, or Sherman will give me a cursing that will be heard in Washington. The first steamer from New Orleans brought every article for which I had made requisition—not omitting the garrison gin and gin-sling, which were not brought in bottles. I guess old To
ceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and very recently by a regular army officer, who pronounced the Thirteenth Maine second to no regiment in the department. Until the forts below New Orleans were captured, Ship Island was the only app
Personal Experience of a Union Veteran By Levi Lindley Hawes (Continued.) About the middle of April General Butler learned that Farragut's fleet had crossed the bar and was ready to proceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and v
Personal Experience of a Union Veteran By Levi Lindley Hawes (Continued.) About the middle of April General Butler learned that Farragut's fleet had crossed the bar and was ready to proceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and ve
November 21st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 11
anded more than three years before. But in our department there were still loose and ragged ends of the rebellion that required special attention; and the well-seasoned Seventy-fourth Regiment, U. S. C. I., was one of the regiments retained to perform duties with which it had become familiar, and for which no regiment was better equipped. Patriotism, loyalty are words which were not flippantly spoken by the men of my command; but by their devotion to duty they exemplified their loyalty and patriotism most happily. With strangely mixed emotions we read our orders to proceed to New Orleans and prepare for muster-out. The sands of Ship Island were not watered with my tears. But when, on the twenty-first day of November, 1865, we received our honorable discharge from the service and our final pay, and I had performed my last official duty—distributed about $200 company savings, giving each man his share—and then took each man bv the hand and said a last good-by, something snapp
protection to known Union men against bushwhackers, and to show the rebels generally that we were ever on the alert. As a matter of fact, we had reason to believe that we were liable to receive a visit from the rebels at any hour, day or night. July 8 brought the pay-master, and orders. One company was ordered to Fort Pike, on the Rigolets, and one to Fort Macomb, on Pass Chef Menteur, these being the entrances to Lake Pontchartrain. Three companies were ordered to Fort Jackson, and one to Qund then I found the army all ready to move out towards Port Hudson. The colonel had been obliged to detail one of his own officers, and it was too late to make any change. I housed my disappointment and resumed my duties at Fort St. Philip. July 8 Port Hudson was annexed, in spite of my nonattendance at the ceremonies, and another chunk of conceit was knocked out of me. Previous to this date, several officers and enlisted men, disgusted at being cooped up in garrison, had sought and obtain
December 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
tively took off my cap in salute of the flag that once proudly floated at her peak, but was not hauled down in token of surrender. But the tangible reminder of all the gallant deeds performed in connection with the capture of the forts rendered our inaction more and more irksome. Then came the rumor—through rebel sources (sources, by the way, through which we received much information of the doings in Washington)—that General Banks had been ordered to relieve General Butler. On Sunday, December 14, 1862, General Banks and his fleet of transports passed the forts. Mobile and Texas, so ran the rumor, are to be annexed at once. We hoped to be included in the annexation business. But the programme was materially modified. About three months later I received a letter from General Dudley's adjutant-general asking me to come to Baton Rouge immediately, for he and other officers had recommended me to Colonel Paine, of the First Louisiana Regiment, who desired an adjutant familiar with<
middle of April General Butler learned that Farragut's fleet had crossed the bar and was ready to proceed up the Mississippi. Six regiments and two batteries were immediately embarked on sailing transports and started for the front. On the eighteenth—although about sixty miles away—we heard the gentle voice of Porter's fifteen-inch mortars. Then came the cheering account of Farragut's passing the forts—Jackson and St. Philip—and later the landing of General Butler in New Orleans on the first of May. Other troops were sent forward as transportation could be furnished, till early in May the Thirteenth Maine only was left on the island. Many are called, but few are chosen, was my comment at the time; and we were the chosen few. Some of the boys regarded this as punishment, but punishment for what? No adequate answer was forthcoming. We had been inspected by General Butler himself, and very recently by a regular army officer, who pronounced the Thirteenth Maine second to no regim
1 2 3 4 5