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ced all the charms of life on the ocean wave, and a home on the rolling deep. As we rolled and pitched on the passage to Fort Monroe, many a luckless soldier went skating down the icy deck till the lee bulwarks ordered a peremptory halt. The order to halt was not always obeyed with such alacrity. At Fort Monroe we received General Butler and staff. We had previously discovered that the Thirty-first Massachusetts Regiment was stowed somewhere down forward. At 10 o'clock p. m. on the twenty-fifth, the engines began to throb, and shortly the capes were left astern. Our final (?) departure was taken, and Ship Island was announced as our destination. About 7 o'clock p. m. on the twenty-sixth I was standing in the lee of the pilot house, greatly interested in the tumbling of a ragged sea. Suddenly, through the gloom, I thought I saw white water on our starboard bow, and I said to the sergeant who stood near me, We are in the midst of breakers, and putting my hands to my mouth, sa
nited States service at the arsenal in Augusta,—December 31, 1861. Here we lived in tents half buried in snow, often drilling in snow knee deep, with the mercury at or below zero, till February 18, 1862, at which date we dug ourselves out of several feet of snow and ice and took train for Boston. About midnight we found ourselves in the Cradle of Liberty, where, it was supposed, we were to be rocked to sleep, but I don't remember to have seen a single sleeping soldier that night. On the twentieth a battalion of the regiment (four companies) (Colonel Dow and Major Hesseltine) was marched to Long wharf and down between decks of the good steamship Mississippi, in which for many days and nights we were literally rocked to sleep. (The six companies of the regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Rust commanding, sailed from New York.) The next day our voyage began, and before it ended the boys experienced all the charms of life on the ocean wave, and a home on the rolling deep. As we rolled and p
March 20th (search for this): chapter 7
ondition. (Blessing on the man who invented forgetfulness.) Four hundred pairs of eyes were shortly on the lookout for Ship Island. By and by masts appeared, and then the hulls came into view, but not the slightest indication of land. Vessels only —apparently in mid-ocean. To see vessels rising apparently out of the water was a novel sight to some of the boys. But when they discovered the low-lying island almost under our jib-boom their astonishment was complete. At 3 o'clock P. M. March 20), we dropped anchor within a cable's length of the Mississippi, which had arrived a day or two in advance of us. Our comrades who had sailed from New York had arrived while we were stranded at Hilton Head, and as we came to anchor gave us hearty cheers from the shore, and we returned the greeting with interest, but we had no further communication with them for three days. We had another practical illustration of the fact that doubtful things are very uncertain. A northerly gale kicked up
December 31st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
n Baltimore, I recorded a vow. As soon thereafter as possible, I turned the key on my mercantile business, and on the twenty-first day of October, 1861, my name was writ large on the enlistment roll; and from that date my time and means were devoted to the business of inducing men to enlist in the Thirteenth Maine Regiment, which was to be attached to General Butler's division for special service,—until the regiment was mustered into the United States service at the arsenal in Augusta,—December 31, 1861. Here we lived in tents half buried in snow, often drilling in snow knee deep, with the mercury at or below zero, till February 18, 1862, at which date we dug ourselves out of several feet of snow and ice and took train for Boston. About midnight we found ourselves in the Cradle of Liberty, where, it was supposed, we were to be rocked to sleep, but I don't remember to have seen a single sleeping soldier that night. On the twentieth a battalion of the regiment (four companies) (Colon
February 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 7
October, 1861, my name was writ large on the enlistment roll; and from that date my time and means were devoted to the business of inducing men to enlist in the Thirteenth Maine Regiment, which was to be attached to General Butler's division for special service,—until the regiment was mustered into the United States service at the arsenal in Augusta,—December 31, 1861. Here we lived in tents half buried in snow, often drilling in snow knee deep, with the mercury at or below zero, till February 18, 1862, at which date we dug ourselves out of several feet of snow and ice and took train for Boston. About midnight we found ourselves in the Cradle of Liberty, where, it was supposed, we were to be rocked to sleep, but I don't remember to have seen a single sleeping soldier that night. On the twentieth a battalion of the regiment (four companies) (Colonel Dow and Major Hesseltine) was marched to Long wharf and down between decks of the good steamship Mississippi, in which for many days an
March 2nd (search for this): chapter 7
e? he asked. Sure, I replied. Then he repeated my report to the quarter-deck, which report brought cheers from every mouth and tears from many eyes. The boats were recalled, and, on account of the heavy sea, were with great difficulty hoisted aboard. A few hours later, piloted by the Mt. Vernon, we let go our anchor near the mouth of the Cape Fear river. The next morning we took a sailing-master from the Mt. Vernon and laid our course for Port Royal (Hilton Head), where we arrived March 2 with our forward compartment full of water. and the ship badly by the head. The next day we hauled around to Seabrook Landing, about eight miles from Hilton Head, and disembarked. The first night we were quartered in a cotton shed, pole floor, and it is my belief that we suffered more from cold than we ever did in Augusta, and the poles were the knottiest and crokedest that ever grew upright. Our flesh was torn as well as our clothes. A wag had For rent pinned to the tail of his coat.
September 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
happy home,—I simply left the state of Maine. Why did you enlist in the military service? After an hour's friendly chat, I think the colonel retired in the firm conviction that I had a valid reason for connecting myself as sergeant in company I, Thirteenth Maine Regiment Infantry. With varied phraseology this pertinent question has been fired at me scores of times. In this connection permit me to read extracts from two letters written in September, 1861. (Extract.) Bangor, Me., September 7, 1861. My dear Levi: You seem to think it is your duty to go into the army, and by what you write I judge that you have decided to go. Well, go, if you think you can endure the exposure and hardships of camp life; and may God bless you in all your endeavors to serve our country, and give you health, strength, and ability equal to your calling. If you do enter your country's service, attach yourself to a cavalry squadron, by all means. I send you a paper to call your attention to the no
September 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
attach yourself to a cavalry squadron, by all means. I send you a paper to call your attention to the notice of a company which is to be recruited in Maine; and you will see that it is more advantageous to enlist here than in Massachusetts. If you wish to obtain a situation in this company, you had better apply at once. Let the store go. Please write very soon, if you do not come home, for I shall feel anxious to hear how you succeed in enlisting. Mother. (Extract.) Boston, September 10, 1861. My dear Mother: Your letter of the 7th inst. received this noon has filled my heart with joy. A thousand thanks for such words as these—words both of consent and blessing. I surely have no desire to bathe my hands in my brother's blood, but when he madly threatens to destroy, not only me, but also the entire family—having used every other means to dissuade him from his cruel purpose in vain—shall I fail or refuse to bring forward the last and most potent argument—the sword—in s
August 1st (search for this): chapter 7
Personal Experience of a Union Veteran By Levi Lindley Hawes About 12 o'clock one August night in 1862, as I sat in my tent at Fort Jackson, La., making out a Post Return—or perhaps writing to the girl I left behind me—I was interrupted by the quiet entrance of the commandant. Ye gods! what do I see? I exclaimed, as the lieutenant-colonel stood before me in full evening (or night) dress. I thought you were asleep hours ago. I have been asleep, he replied, but when I awoke and saw a light in your tent, I said to myself, this witching hour of night is a proper time for me to ask Levi what prompted or induced him to enter the service. You, an only son, left a delightful, happy home,—I simply left the state of Maine. Why did you enlist in the military service? After an hour's friendly chat, I think the colonel retired in the firm conviction that I had a valid reason for connecting myself as sergeant in company I, Thirteenth Maine Regiment Infantry. With varied phraseology th<
September, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 7
ervice. You, an only son, left a delightful, happy home,—I simply left the state of Maine. Why did you enlist in the military service? After an hour's friendly chat, I think the colonel retired in the firm conviction that I had a valid reason for connecting myself as sergeant in company I, Thirteenth Maine Regiment Infantry. With varied phraseology this pertinent question has been fired at me scores of times. In this connection permit me to read extracts from two letters written in September, 1861. (Extract.) Bangor, Me., September 7, 1861. My dear Levi: You seem to think it is your duty to go into the army, and by what you write I judge that you have decided to go. Well, go, if you think you can endure the exposure and hardships of camp life; and may God bless you in all your endeavors to serve our country, and give you health, strength, and ability equal to your calling. If you do enter your country's service, attach yourself to a cavalry squadron, by all means. I sen
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