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tober 1; 9 to 12 and 2 to 5 during the other half year, except on short days, when the Schools may be closed at sunset. Instructors are to be in their rooms and to ring the bell ten minutes before the time of opening school. After the school is opened, no scholar shall be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be enforced in the schools outside the Neck so far as is advisable. This year, also, changes were made in the curriculum, and the following list was authorized and approved:— Fourth class, primary,
January 28th (search for this): chapter 11
hat the trustees supply Mr. Fairbanks' school with three dozen slates; that all lady teachers in the primary schools be allowed nine afternoons in the course of the year to visit all the other primary schools; and that children may enter from the primary to the other schools at the age of seven, instead of eight, at the discretion of the teacher. Among the bills approved is one for $40.80 to Martin Draper. He may have finished out the winter term at the Russell school, as Mr. Hastings, January 28, requested to be discharged from the same, with reasons. At the final examinations in April there were enrolled in the ten primary schools 1610 scholars; in the five grammar schools, 639; in the four schools without the peninsula, 280; making a total of 1,529. The lamentable number of absences is :commented upon. These absentees hang like a dead weight about the school; the course of instruction is greatly interrupted, and those who are punctual and constant are retarded in their pro
the first week in June, as Boston teachers have, it was voted inexpedient. The teachers for the winter term outside the peninsula were: W. S. Wiley, of the Gardner school; Levi Russell, of the Russell school: David Curtis, of the Winter Hill; Joel Pierce, of the Milk Row; and Norwood P. Damon, of the Prospect Hill. The three last-named received $35 per month. Evidently the new school did not start under the most favorable auspices. The teacher was requested to vacate on the last day of March, and Levi Russell, who had finished his own school, was hired to finish out the term at Prospect Hill. The last weeks of the winter term at Winter Hill school were taught by Miss Abby Mead, who received $17.50 therefor. She respectfully declined her appointment to the school for the next summer. January 30, 1837, Dr. Valentine is authorized to visit the schools and see that all children are vaccinated. He is to present his bill for payment when parents are unable to pay. This vote was
Among the bills approved is one for $40.80 to Martin Draper. He may have finished out the winter term at the Russell school, as Mr. Hastings, January 28, requested to be discharged from the same, with reasons. At the final examinations in April there were enrolled in the ten primary schools 1610 scholars; in the five grammar schools, 639; in the four schools without the peninsula, 280; making a total of 1,529. The lamentable number of absences is :commented upon. These absentees hangxcuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be
hose who are punctual and constant are retarded in their progress. The remedy is alone with the parents. The Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Charlestown Free Schools, adopted by the Board of Trustees, and bearing the date, January 1, 1833, is of interest at this point. After stating the age at which children may attend the primary and the grammar schools (from four to eight, and from eight to fifteen), the hours for the school session are given,—8 to 11 and 2 to 5, from April 1 to October 1; 9 to 12 and 2 to 5 during the other half year, except on short days, when the Schools may be closed at sunset. Instructors are to be in their rooms and to ring the bell ten minutes before the time of opening school. After the school is opened, no scholar shall be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election D
e-elected to the Winter Hill; Miss Ann W. Locke, of the Milk Row district (later on a teacher in one of the primary schools); Miss Martha T. McKoun for the Russell school; and Miss Sarah M. Crowninshield for the Gardner school. It was voted in May to make repairs at Milk Row school. These were all the more needed, for, June 30, we read: It having been represented by Mr. C. Thompson that the windows in the schoolhouse there have been very badly broken, it was voted that the committee in chao voted that no children should be admitted into any free school of Charlestown without vaccination certificates, and that no unvaccinated child should be allowed to remain in school after February 13, 1837. From the annual report, read at the May town meeting, we learn that an average of eleven per cent., or over 200 scholars, have been absent from school the past year. This is the cause of moist of the corporal punishment which is inflicted in the schools, as those absent acquire habits
and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teachers begin with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Milk Row school. November 15, 1838, an attempt was made to arrange the boundaries between the Bunker Hill and Winter Hill districts. This is the first time I find mention of a Bunker Hill district. March 18, 1839, the trustees passed a vote that the Neck school hereafter be ca
y compels us to ask an appropriation of $200 for the repair of the schoolhouse in the Russell district. The building has not been repaired since its erection: the seats and benches are in bad condition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 1838-1839. The teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row; Elizabeth P. Whittredge, of Prospect Hill; and Abby Mead, of Winter Hill road. May 9 Mr. Forster was authorized to procure a teacher until Miss Mead is able to take charge. Miss Ellen A. Damon was elected to this position June 11. These schools were assigned to the care of Messrs. Allen and Underwood for the trustees. They gave permission to children contiguous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June
ote of the town, Messrs. Warren and Valentine were requested to look up the law relating to the establishment of high schools. February 23, 1837, they reported in favor of such a school, and their report was presented at the next town meeting. The formation of a new district school in Milk Row by a division of the district, as referred to the trustees by the town, was next referred to Messrs. Allen and Underwood as a special committee to consider the matter and report later. They found, May 30, that the number of scholars warrants a division of said district, commencing at a point in the Russell district, thence running easterly south of John Tufts' house to the south side of the wind mill on Prospect Hill; thence northeast of the house of William Bonner, embracing in the present district the houses of Ephraim Hill and Charles Miller; thence from said Miller's to Cambridge line, west of Charles Wait's house. Exertions have been made to find suitable accommodations for a school b
instructed not to allow the children of John Runey to remain at the school unless he consents to be set off from Winter Hill to Prospect Hill district. In regard to a petition of the teachers within the Neck for a vacation of the first week in June, as Boston teachers have, it was voted inexpedient. The teachers for the winter term outside the peninsula were: W. S. Wiley, of the Gardner school; Levi Russell, of the Russell school: David Curtis, of the Winter Hill; Joel Pierce, of the Milkgave permission to children contiguous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June and the last two weeks in August, and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teac
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