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Edward Wyman (search for this): chapter 11
ead for the Gardner. These schools were assigned to the charge of Messrs. Hazeltine and Allen for the trustees. Among bills approved was that of A. W. Whittredge for $52.50. The winter terms were to be taught by Norwood Damon at the Russell, Edward Wyman at Winter Hill, Timothy P. Rogers at the Gardner, and Miss Ann Whipple was appointed for the Milk Row school, at the same compensation as was given last winter to a male teacher. In the annual report Miss Whipple was highly commended. As Mr.s. It is also an interruption to the female department. 1836-1837. The teachers for this summer outside the peninsula were: Miss Abby Mead, of the Winter Hill school; Miss Ann E. Whipple, of the Milk Row; Miss Burnham of the Russell; and Miss Wyman, of the Gardner. In accordance with the vote of the town, Messrs. Warren and Valentine were requested to look up the law relating to the establishment of high schools. February 23, 1837, they reported in favor of such a school, and their repo
George P. Worcester (search for this): chapter 11
and stationery to their scholars. Messrs. Warren and Underwood were authorized to examine Miss E. H. Dodge, one of the primary teachers, to see how often she had dismissed without leave and how often she had left her school in charge of another person. A change at her school was found necessary. The teachers of the winter schools in the outside districts were: Levi Russell at Prospect Hill; Wymond Bradley at Winter Hill; Oliver March at Milk Row; G. A. Parker at the Gardner; and George P. Worcester at the Russell. As Mr. Parker fell sick, his term was completed by Rachel T. Stevens. The schools were examined and gave general satisfaction. From the annual report we learn that there are now fourteen primary schools on the peninsula, with 957 pupils, or an average of seventy each. In the three grammar schools there are 830 pupils, and in the five schools beyond the Neck, 276, making a total of 2,063. The increase is due to the fact that the Irish have given up their own separ
Woodbridge (search for this): chapter 11
Dictionary, Natural Reader, Frost's Grammar, Field's American Geography and Atlas. First class, the First Class Book, Young Ladies' Class Book, Walker's Dictionary, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Worcester's Geography, or Elements of History, Progressive Exercises in Composition. Writing schools, Emerson's Second Part, Colburn's Sequel, Boston Writing Slips. The following books may be used by the consent of the teachers and trustees: Blake's Astronomy, Grund's Natural Philosophy, Woodbridge's History of the United States, Parley's First Book of History, Worcester's Sequel to the Spelling Book, The Academical (Boys') Speaker, Grund's Geometry, Bookkeeping. Sullivan's Political Class Book is to be put in the schools for reference. 1833-1834. It was voted early this season to retain the services of Mr. Sherman at No. 5, at the salary of $360, and to pay the teacher at the Neck $600. Miss Kezia Russell was appointed to teach the summer term in the Russell district, and Mis
Paul Willard (search for this): chapter 11
shal, and agreeably to the request of the committee of arrangements, and that the schools have a vacation during that day—June 24. The petition of John Tufts and others praying for a removal of the schoolhouse in Milk Row was referred to Messrs. Willard, Frothingham, and (later) Hawkins. This seems to be the first move on record looking to the establishment of the Prospect Hill school on Medford street. Voted that teachers receive no scholar into school after twenty minutes past the hour ffollows: At Milk Row to Luther (should be Calvin) Farrar; at Winter Hill to A. B. Magoun; at the Russell district to Henry I. Jewett; at the Gardner school to William E. Faulkner. As Mr. Magoun did not accept, Henry Bulfinch was appointed. Paul Willard, who signed the annual report, says: It would be unjust to; withhold an expression of the belief that the three high schools within the Neck, under the care of five masters, have reached a standing not before attained by them. These five teac
W. S. Wiley (search for this): chapter 11
name of the Prospect Hill district, and $600 was appropriated for the building. The committee in charge of this school were instructed not to allow the children of John Runey to remain at the school unless he consents to be set off from Winter Hill to Prospect Hill district. In regard to a petition of the teachers within the Neck for a vacation of the first week in June, as Boston teachers have, it was voted inexpedient. The teachers for the winter term outside the peninsula were: W. S. Wiley, of the Gardner school; Levi Russell, of the Russell school: David Curtis, of the Winter Hill; Joel Pierce, of the Milk Row; and Norwood P. Damon, of the Prospect Hill. The three last-named received $35 per month. Evidently the new school did not start under the most favorable auspices. The teacher was requested to vacate on the last day of March, and Levi Russell, who had finished his own school, was hired to finish out the term at Prospect Hill. The last weeks of the winter term at
Elizabeth P. Whittredge (search for this): chapter 11
e teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row; Elizabeth P. Whittredge, of Prospect Hill; and Abby Mead, of Winter Hill road. May 9 Mr. Forster was authorized to procure a teacher until Miss Mead is able to take charge. Missode of teaching. The Prospect Hill school was erected three years ago to accommodate the inhabitants of that part, formerly a part of Milk Row district. Miss E. P. Whittredge was teacher last summer, and had an average of fifty out of sixty-one pupils. This lady received the decided approbation of the board. She was efficient Primary teachers, each $210, fourteen Schools2,940.00 Winter Hill:— Ann E. Newell20.00 Ellen A. Damon45.00 James Hove280.00 Prospect Hill:— Miss E. P. Whittredge120.00 Amos S. Allen210.00 Milk Row:— Miss S. M. Burnham120.00 Joel Pierce192.50 Russell district:— Clara D. Whittemore96.00 P. R. Russell
A. W. Whittredge (search for this): chapter 11
— 35 shares of Union bank stock$3,500 Town note on interest1,200 Deacon Miller's legacy100 Two primary schools, valued at600 ———– $5,400 1835-1836. The teachers for the summer schools beyond the peninsula were Miss Ann E. Whipple for Milk Row, Miss Abby Mead for Winter Hill, Miss Kezia Russell for the Russell, and Miss Anna B. Mead for the Gardner. These schools were assigned to the charge of Messrs. Hazeltine and Allen for the trustees. Among bills approved was that of A. W. Whittredge for $52.50. The winter terms were to be taught by Norwood Damon at the Russell, Edward Wyman at Winter Hill, Timothy P. Rogers at the Gardner, and Miss Ann Whipple was appointed for the Milk Row school, at the same compensation as was given last winter to a male teacher. In the annual report Miss Whipple was highly commended. As Mr. Damon resigned November 30, Mr. (Samuel?) Swan was put in his place. The primary school occupied by Ann W. Locke, having been burned in the late confl
Clara D. Whittemore (search for this): chapter 11
to every school of the former highly acceptable and competent teachers. These are: I. N. Sherman, at Milk Row; Miss Abba Mead, at Winter Hill; Manda (Miranda) Whittemore, at the Russell, and Mary W. Jeffurds at the Gardner districts. Miss Jeffurds is allowed to keep some private scholars not exceeding six, and to receive compencondition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 1838-1839. The teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row; Elizabeth P. Whittredge, of Prospect Hill; and Abby Mead, of Winter Hill road. May 9 Mr. Forster was authoriA. Damon45.00 James Hove280.00 Prospect Hill:— Miss E. P. Whittredge120.00 Amos S. Allen210.00 Milk Row:— Miss S. M. Burnham120.00 Joel Pierce192.50 Russell district:— Clara D. Whittemore96.00 P. R. Russell, Jr120.00 Gardner district:— M. W. J. Evans96.00 William R. Bagnall120.00 (To be cont
Clara Whittemore (search for this): chapter 11
age attendance was seventeen out of a total of nineteen. The teacher had classes in geometry, algebra, and natural philosophy, nor were the common branches neglected. Also, there was instruction in the rudiments of music. The winter term was under William R. Bagnall, with an average of twenty out of twenty-four. The Russell district verges upon the town of West Cambridge, the schoolhouse being about one-half mile from that meeting house. During the summer this school was under Miss Clara Whittemore. Whole number, twenty-four; average attendance, eighteen, mostly small children. She had brought the school from a state of confusion to one of discipline. During the winter Phila Russell had charge. Whole number, thirty-seven; average, thirty. His efforts and skill are worthy of the highest commendation. He insisted upon the thoroughness of all his pupils. His uniform practice is, if a pupil makes a blunder in recitation, he is compelled afterwards to repeat that part of his
Emeline G. White (search for this): chapter 11
ng not before attained by them. These five teachers were Joshua Bates (salary, $800) and James Swan ($700) at the Training Field school; Nathan Merrill ($700) and Reuben Swan, Jr. ($700), at the Town Hill, or Female, school; William D. Swan ($700) at the Neck School. We are able to name the teachers who served in the ten primary schools this year, at a maximum salary of $225. They were: A. G. Twy– cross, Susan Sawyer, Mary Walker, Hannah Andrews, Hannah Rea, Betsey Putnam, Ann Brown, Emeline G. White, Elizabeth L. Johnson, Margaret W. Locke, Ann W. Locke, Eliza (Ann?) Cutter, Lydia A. Skilton. The permanent funds of the trustees of Charlestown schools in 1834 were:— 35 shares of Union bank stock$3,500 Town note on interest1,200 Deacon Miller's legacy100 Two primary schools, valued at600 ———– $5,400 1835-1836. The teachers for the summer schools beyond the peninsula were Miss Ann E. Whipple for Milk Row, Miss Abby Mead for Winter Hill, Miss Kezia Russell for the
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