hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ellen M. Wright 60 0 Browse Search
Winter Hill (Wyoming, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) 42 0 Browse Search
Guy C. Hawkins 34 0 Browse Search
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Charles Forster 25 3 Browse Search
Charles D. Elliot 24 4 Browse Search
Frank Mortimer Hawes 23 1 Browse Search
John Tufts 23 1 Browse Search
Chester Adams 22 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. Search the whole document.

Found 141 total hits in 49 results.

1 2 3 4 5
March 17th (search for this): chapter 6
its different attractions, and that his trees, most eloquent in the golden silence of their sunlit branches, might still help to plead his cause and their own. The Fells as a park, glorious among the parks of nations, made appeal quite as strong to the ambition of the wealthy as to philanthropy and public spirit; and although little outside his own personal influencing Was achieved toward the indispensable voluntary pledge, the spring of 1883 had hardly begun before Mr. Wright's words of March 17, Everybody seems to be enthusiastically in favor of having the thing done—at the expense of somebody else, had become literally the truth. In other words, the popularity, including the favor of wealth so indispensable to administrative action, of the Fells cause, or park cause, had become an established fact. How well established I have some reason to know, for, hoping to help a little myself, as well as to save Mr. Wright some of the many little expenses which he so constantly and gladly
imilar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was thought to have been hastened by overwork in this cause, and to be an irreparable loss to the whole movement. The agitation became more energetic when real estate speculators bought the woods along Ravine road, cut off the grand pines, land turned the scene of beauty into the hideousness of a logging camp. The Appalachian Club took up the matter, and April 2, 1890, appointed Charles Elliot, George C. Mann, and Rosewell
September (search for this): chapter 6
illing to work should, without his aid or prompting, effect the other organizations. Such help was not forthcoming; and his last Forest Festival, held, I think, in 1885, the year of his death, had for its object so to strengthen his little Fells Association as to help him in gaining this help. In 1885, too, by his invitation, the National Forestry Congress was held in Boston. Towards its success, and still that of similar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was th
November 21st (search for this): chapter 6
think, in 1885, the year of his death, had for its object so to strengthen his little Fells Association as to help him in gaining this help. In 1885, too, by his invitation, the National Forestry Congress was held in Boston. Towards its success, and still that of similar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was thought to have been hastened by overwork in this cause, and to be an irreparable loss to the whole movement. The agitation became more energetic when real
Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. By Ellen M. Wright. (Condensed.) No man, however gifted, sets his pen to work for right against might or mammon with any great chance of becoming anything but poorer, and in 1839, after seven crowded years of such work in the anti-slavery cause, two events occurred which brought Mr. Wright so near destitution that for a number of years his life was a hand-to-hand fight with the wolf at his door. In 1837, while secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York, he chanced, at De Behr's repository of foreign books, to come upon a cheap copy of La Fontaine's Fables in the French, with some 200 wood cuts in it. His little son, he tells us in his introduction to his translations, was just beginning to feel the intellectual magnetism of pictures, and, to please him, he bought the book. The pictures alone, however, were not enough to satisfy the child; he must have the stories, too; and from putting them into English by word of m
Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. By Ellen M. Wright. (Condensed.) No man, however gifted, sets his pen to work for right against might or mammon with any great chance of becoming anything but poorer, and in 1839, after seven crowded years of such work in the anti-slavery cause, two events occurred which brought Mr. Wright so near destitution that for a number of years his life was a hand-to-hand fight with the wolf at his door. In 1837, while secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York, he chanced, at De Behr's repository of foreign books, to come upon a cheap copy of La Fontaine's Fables in the French, with some 200 wood cuts in it. His little son, he tells us in his introduction to his translations, was just beginning to feel the intellectual magnetism of pictures, and, to please him, he bought the book. The pictures alone, however, were not enough to satisfy the child; he must have the stories, too; and from putting them into English by word of m
is law of 1882 nothing of the people's fresh air and other benefits went into the pockets of any man, and his plan, by stimulating public spirit in the Fells owners, and by taking all the land at one time, was as well secured against money greed as it is possible in the nature—or, father, human nature—of things for la plan to be. But at first his hope for his object lay in the city government; and tall undaunted — if he ever heard of it—by A. S. Hilliard's remark to H. W. S. Cleveland, who in 1857 urged on one occasion the same object, that you might as well try to persuade the Common Council to buy land in the moon as the Fells, his first step was this very trial. No man of the city's executive, who could be persuaded to go, but was taken through the Fells, and there seconded by the multitudinous facts of its glorious predestination. Mr. Wright urged its claims to be secured at once. When Mr. De las Casas, of the present Park Board, in his historical sketch for the New England Mag
nd Scotland. It took three hard, desperate, courageous years, but every copy of the edition was at last sold, and his debts paid,; not wholly from the proceeds of his sales, but from them and later earnings. It was while pushing this cruelly slow work in London that Mr. Wright first realized the great necessity of parks to crowded and growing cities. In England he kept sharp watch on all from which he could get knowledge or inspiration. Mr. Wright's discovery of the Fells was not till 1864, when he came to live in Medford, and until 1880 his time was still pressed with other important work, but he did not forget the city's need of a park. In Medford, with his home on Pine Hill, and from its top rock a glimpse of the city and ocean, and on all other sides rocks, dells, hills, and the almost unbroken woods, another site, nearer Boston, richer and more varied in its wild pictures, and with a larger promise of a future forest, had revealed itself in the :Old Five Mile Woods, or Mi
that he sought—or had to seek; the men of soul came of their own accord, and, in so far as they were his anti-slavery co-workers, consisted of Theodore D. Weld, John G. Whittier, and Samuel E. Sewell. When Sylvester Baxter, in his Boston Park Guide, said of What Mr. Wright's persistence had created, The public sentiment aroused by this agitation finally led to the Metropolitan Park System, he was writing history, not politics. The hearings before the City Council Committee took place in 1869. Of the General Court action, which in 1870 was the outcome of these hearings, Mr. Wright in his Appeal called The Park Question, wrote: The well-guarded Park bill of last year, which submitted the whole problem of the future beauty and grandeur of our city to a competent and impartial commission, was defeated in the interest of projectors who have manifest private ends to serve. Everybody has private ends; and the public is not about to forego its own ends lest somebody should be privately
created, The public sentiment aroused by this agitation finally led to the Metropolitan Park System, he was writing history, not politics. The hearings before the City Council Committee took place in 1869. Of the General Court action, which in 1870 was the outcome of these hearings, Mr. Wright in his Appeal called The Park Question, wrote: The well-guarded Park bill of last year, which submitted the whole problem of the future beauty and grandeur of our city to a competent and impartial commng care to stimulate all the interest awakened, and before long a number of able writers had come to his laid. His literary and mathematical powers at this epoch had so far got the better of his poverty that he was enabled during the years from 1870 to 1880 to purchase as his own contribution to the park some fifty or sixty acres of wild wood's. During this ten years of effort for the Fells, in addition to labors which hardly gave him time to draw a long breath, Mr. Wright hoped that younger
1 2 3 4 5