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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
who in 1857 urged on one occasion the same object, that you might as well try to persuade the Common Council to buy land in the moon as the Fells, his first step was this very trial. No man of the city's executive, who could be persuaded to go, but was taken through the Fells, and there seconded by the multitudinous facts of its glorious predestination. Mr. Wright urged its claims to be secured at once. When Mr. De las Casas, of the present Park Board, in his historical sketch for the New England Magazine of 1898, says of Mr. Wright, He was trained in his line of thought by association with the anti-slavery movement and by a residence in England, where he had watched the use of the common lands by the masses, he says truly, for the former had certainly taught him that until some determined man or leader of men, ready to wear the thorns, and let others take the laurels, has gone ahead to pave the way, the last thing the masses have anything to hope from is this mammon-ruled adminis
Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e in Medford, and until 1880 his time was still pressed with other important work, but he did not forget the city's need of a park. In Medford, with his home on Pine Hill, and from its top rock a glimpse of the city and ocean, and on all other sides rocks, dells, hills, and the almost unbroken woods, another site, nearer Boston, r November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright withand my wish was to keep to my own terms, it was again, on Mr. Chase's motion, decided that the money should go toward the erection of a little stone structure on Pine Hill in honor of Mr. Wright. The motion, in the contribution of such money as remained in its treasury, was seconded by Mr. Wright's Medford Public Domain Club of 18
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he could get knowledge or inspiration. Mr. Wright's discovery of the Fells was not till 1864, when he came to live in Medford, and until 1880 his time was still pressed with other important work, but he did not forget the city's need of a park. In Medford, with his home on Pine Hill, and from its top rock a glimpse of the city and ocean, and on all other sides rocks, dells, hills, and the almost unbroken woods, another site, nearer Boston, richer and more varied in its wild pictures, and was the one adopted. During the next two months these able advocates had made such headway that the mass meeting held in Medford January 1, 1881, was crowded and addressed by speakers who, having just returned from a smart drive through the Fells, whe Fells Association, might elect committees and employ them. Such a club, comprising some 200 members, he organized in Medford; and it only needed that some ten or twenty others as enterprising and as willing to work should, without his aid or pro
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
entured upon the undertaking,—doing editorial work for other anti-slavery papers in the meanwhile, and importing for his fables the expensive and speaking illustrations of Grandville. While the publication was in process, his brother-in-law failed, and the cost became wholly Mr. Wright's. His earnings were hardly enough for home needs, and there was nothing to do but to take his book from door to door. He did this, going from city to city, first in his own country, and then in England and Scotland. It took three hard, desperate, courageous years, but every copy of the edition was at last sold, and his debts paid,; not wholly from the proceeds of his sales, but from them and later earnings. It was while pushing this cruelly slow work in London that Mr. Wright first realized the great necessity of parks to crowded and growing cities. In England he kept sharp watch on all from which he could get knowledge or inspiration. Mr. Wright's discovery of the Fells was not till 1864, whe
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
no fault of his if they did not at least prove the saviours of their own little Fells brotherhood. By 1882 he had obtained in his Forestry Law all the legislation necessary to his plan and the taking of lands in behalf of forests anywhere in Massachusetts, and had enlisted a competent board of trustees to take charge of the conditional obligations. This done, the object of his labors was to direct as broad a public attention as possible to the fact that a way was now open to secure the Fells,g camp. The Appalachian Club took up the matter, and April 2, 1890, appointed Charles Elliot, George C. Mann, and Rosewell B. Lawrence to arrange for a meeting of all persons interested in the preservation of scenery and historical sites in Massachusetts. And this meeting, according to Mr. De las Casas, by a sequence of other efforts and events, resulted in the Metropolitan Park law of 1893. Mr. Wright was a member of the Appalachian Club, and somewhere between 1881 and 1885 he had the pleas
does not speak truly when he says that Mr. Wright, in behalf of his Fells, naturally enough began to agitate and seek the assistance of thoseif they wished, by their own effort and generosity, to secure their Fells for themselves, and which, should they fail in so doing, would by imething almost human and wholly divine, and in no other part of his Fells had God blessed a spot with trees older and grander than in the Ravhis if they did not at least prove the saviours of their own little Fells brotherhood. By 1882 he had obtained in his Forestry Law all the la series of yearly Forest Festivals, held in different parts of his Fells, that the able speaking which it was his care to procure might be s broadly beneficial Metropolitan idea, including as it did both his Fells and Blue Hills, would have made him supremely happy, and its carryiomain Club of 1884; and as Mr. Wright did not let the stones of his Fells cry out in vain, it is fitting, but it is not necessary. To him th
Charles Elliot (search for this): chapter 6
iven, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was thought to have been hastened by overwork in this cause, and to be an irreparable loss to the whole movement. The agitation became more energetic when real estate speculators bought the woods along Ravine road, cut off the grand pines, land turned the scene of beauty into the hideousness of a logging camp. The Appalachian Club took up the matter, and April 2, 1890, appointed Charles Elliot, George C. Mann, and Rosewell B. Lawrence to arrange for a meeting of all persons interested in the preservation of scenery and historical sites in Massachusetts. And this meeting, according to Mr. De las Casas, by a sequence of other efforts and events, resulted in the Metropolitan Park law of 1893. Mr. Wright was a member of the Appalachian Club, and somewhere between 1881 and 1885 he had the pleasure of escorting a very large portion of the membership through the Fells, and in 1884,
La Fontaine (search for this): chapter 6
t for a number of years his life was a hand-to-hand fight with the wolf at his door. In 1837, while secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York, he chanced, at De Behr's repository of foreign books, to come upon a cheap copy of La Fontaine's Fables in the French, with some 200 wood cuts in it. His little son, he tells us in his introduction to his translations, was just beginning to feel the intellectual magnetism of pictures, and, to please him, he bought the book. The pictureamong us the face of that devoted friend of all outdoor exploration, Elizur Wright. I have known him almost all my life; first as the fearless ally, and at times the equally fearless critic of William Lloyd Garrison; then as the translator of La Fontaine's Fables,—a task for which he seemed fitted by something French in his temperament, a certain mixture of fire and bonhomie, which lasted to the end of his days; then as a zealous petitioner before the legislature to remove the lingering disabi
John G. Whittier (search for this): chapter 6
nvited the assistance of all; but it was only the money men and the politicians that he sought—or had to seek; the men of soul came of their own accord, and, in so far as they were his anti-slavery co-workers, consisted of Theodore D. Weld, John G. Whittier, and Samuel E. Sewell. When Sylvester Baxter, in his Boston Park Guide, said of What Mr. Wright's persistence had created, The public sentiment aroused by this agitation finally led to the Metropolitan Park System, he was writing history, nting, but it is not necessary. To him the stones and all else cried, Save the woods; and, thanks to the Metropolitan share in so doing, the sort of column Mr. Wright would best have liked is already in progress. In the words of his old friend Whittier to another unselfish worker for humanity, there are grateful hearts instead of marble shaping his viewless monument. That any part of his share in this gratitude should be given to others would not in the least have troubled him. Indeed, could
William Lloyd Garrison (search for this): chapter 6
were honest, would have had his heartiest co-operation. Rosewell B. Lawrence, secretary of the Appalachian Club, publishes the following from the pen of T. W. Higginson in his pamphlet, The Middlesex Fells, of 1886, which was delivered before the club after Mr. Wright's death: We miss from among us the face of that devoted friend of all outdoor exploration, Elizur Wright. I have known him almost all my life; first as the fearless ally, and at times the equally fearless critic of William Lloyd Garrison; then as the translator of La Fontaine's Fables,—a task for which he seemed fitted by something French in his temperament, a certain mixture of fire and bonhomie, which lasted to the end of his days; then as a zealous petitioner before the legislature to remove the lingering disabilities of atheists; and then as the eager, hopeful, patient, unconquerable advocate of the scheme for setting apart the Middlesex Fells as a forest park. I served with him for a time on a committee for th
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