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Larkin Turner (search for this): chapter 8
Walker was succeeded by James K. Frothingham. 1832, Paul Willard, Esq., Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey, James K. Frothingham (president), Henry Jaques, Joseph F. Tufts. 1833, James K. Frothingham (president), Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Guy C. Hawkins, Joseph F. Tufts, Charles Thompson, Chester Adams. 1834, the same. 1835, Charles Thompson (treasurer), Paul Willard (secretary), Amos Hazeltine, Joseph F. Tufts, Captain Larkin Turner (president), John Stevens, Alfred Allen. 1836, Charles Thompson (president), J. W. Valentine, M. D., George W. Warren (treasurer), Alfred Allen, James Underwood, Charles Forster, Thomas Browne, Jr. (secretary). 1837, the same. 1838, Richard Frothingham, Jr., Charles Forster, Alfred Allen, Thomas Browne, Jr., George W. Warren, James Underwood, Eliah P. Mackintire. 1839, the same, except that John Sanborn succeeds Mr. Mackintire. 1840, Richard Frothingham, Jr. (president
Ebenezer Smith (search for this): chapter 8
lose an application to their duties. The winter terms for the schools beyond the Neck began the second Monday in November. The following were the teachers appointed: James Swan, for the Russell district; Jeremiah Sanborn, for Milk Row; Ebenezer Smith, Jr., for tile Gardner district; and Moses W. Walker, Winter Hill. Before the end of the term, Mr. Smith had been succeeded by L. W. Stanton, and George W. Brown had charge for two months at Winter Hill. The schools at No. 4 and No. 5 are nowMr. Smith had been succeeded by L. W. Stanton, and George W. Brown had charge for two months at Winter Hill. The schools at No. 4 and No. 5 are now allowed to be kept through the entire year. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to make such arrangements as may be thought best in regard to the stove and chimney in the Winter Hill schoolhouse. They are also appointed to supply the outlying schools with wood. A committee appointed to examine the schoolhouse in Milk Row reported that repairs were necessary. It was left to Messrs. Hawkins and Thompson to make the same. April 25, 1831, John Sweetser was paid $64.62 for these repairs.
P. R. Russell (search for this): chapter 8
in the first Monday in December. Lewis Colby, of Cambridge College, seems to have taken Mr. Hastings' place for a few weeks. January 18, 1830, Mr. Allen requested to be relieved from further services on account of some unpleasant circumstances having occurred from want of suitable discipline in his school. His resignation was accepted, and Lewis Colby, a member of the Cambridge school, was put in charge. From bills approved we learn that Mr. Allen received $51.68; Mr. Hastings, $98; Mr. Russell, $120; Mr. Colby, $76.40; and Mr. Sawyer, $124. At the examination of No. 7, Messrs. Wyman and Jackson reported that Mr. Hastings had taught the school with much ability, and they were highly gratified. No. 6 was also commended by the examiners, Messrs. Wyman and Walker. Mr. Colby's school was examined by Chester Adams. Forty-eight were present out of a total of seventy-four. This school has given the trustees much anxiety, but since it was under the present management it has improved,
M. Whittemore (search for this): chapter 8
Charlestown schools after 1825. By Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) 1828-1829. The affairs of wards 3 and 6 were assigned to Robert G. Tenney, land of wards 4 and 5 to Luke Wyman. Miss Whittemore was appointed to school No. 4, Miss Stearns to No. 5, Miss Ward to No. 3, land Miss Gerrish to No. 6, tall for the summer term. For the winter term, Philemon R. Russell, Jr., was engaged to teach in ward 4, Samuel Pitts in ward 5, Joseph W. Jenks in ward 3, and Francis S. Eastman in ward 6. As the last named did not accept, C. C. King was secured in his place. The report for the year says there were about 200 scholars outside the Neck, that schools No. 3 and 6 had ten and one-half months of school, the other two schools nine months. Of bills approved, Lemuel Gulliver received $125; Eliza D. Ward, $88; Miss Gerrish, $88; Miss M. Whittemore, $71.50; Miss Maria H. Stearns, $6.5; Philemon R. Russell, Jr., $120; Mr. Pitts, $98; and C. C. King, $160. Within the Neck, at the e
Amos Hazeltine (search for this): chapter 8
y. 1831, the same, except that Mr. Walker was succeeded by James K. Frothingham. 1832, Paul Willard, Esq., Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey, James K. Frothingham (president), Henry Jaques, Joseph F. Tufts. 1833, James K. Frothingham (president), Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Guy C. Hawkins, Joseph F. Tufts, Charles Thompson, Chester Adams. 1834, the same. 1835, Charles Thompson (treasurer), Paul Willard (secretary), Amos Hazeltine, Joseph F. Tufts, Captain Larkin Turner (president), John Stevens, Alfred Allen. 1836, Charles Thompson (president), J. W. Valentine, M. D., George W. Warren (treasurer), Alfred Allen, James Underwood, Charles Forster, Thomas Browne, Jr. (secretary). 1837, the same. 1838, Richard Frothingham, Jr., Charles Forster, Alfred Allen, Thomas Browne, Jr., George W. Warren, James Underwood, Eliah P. Mackintire. 1839, the same, except that John Sanborn succeeds Mr. Mackintire. 1840,
Henry Jackson (search for this): chapter 8
er than fourteen, as heretofore. The report, which is signed by Chester Adams, secretary, in closing says: The children never appeared to the trustees so deserving of commendation as at the present time. 1829-1830. From the report of Rev. Henry Jackson, secretary of the Board of Trustees for this year, we learn the following facts (concerning Charlestown school affairs):— The schools without the peninsula were taught from nine to eleven months each. At the examination of the primary y, a member of the Cambridge school, was put in charge. From bills approved we learn that Mr. Allen received $51.68; Mr. Hastings, $98; Mr. Russell, $120; Mr. Colby, $76.40; and Mr. Sawyer, $124. At the examination of No. 7, Messrs. Wyman and Jackson reported that Mr. Hastings had taught the school with much ability, and they were highly gratified. No. 6 was also commended by the examiners, Messrs. Wyman and Walker. Mr. Colby's school was examined by Chester Adams. Forty-eight were present
Joseph W. Jenks (search for this): chapter 8
Charlestown schools after 1825. By Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) 1828-1829. The affairs of wards 3 and 6 were assigned to Robert G. Tenney, land of wards 4 and 5 to Luke Wyman. Miss Whittemore was appointed to school No. 4, Miss Stearns to No. 5, Miss Ward to No. 3, land Miss Gerrish to No. 6, tall for the summer term. For the winter term, Philemon R. Russell, Jr., was engaged to teach in ward 4, Samuel Pitts in ward 5, Joseph W. Jenks in ward 3, and Francis S. Eastman in ward 6. As the last named did not accept, C. C. King was secured in his place. The report for the year says there were about 200 scholars outside the Neck, that schools No. 3 and 6 had ten and one-half months of school, the other two schools nine months. Of bills approved, Lemuel Gulliver received $125; Eliza D. Ward, $88; Miss Gerrish, $88; Miss M. Whittemore, $71.50; Miss Maria H. Stearns, $6.5; Philemon R. Russell, Jr., $120; Mr. Pitts, $98; and C. C. King, $160. Within the Neck, at the e
James Walker (search for this): chapter 8
reported that Mr. Hastings had taught the school with much ability, and they were highly gratified. No. 6 was also commended by the examiners, Messrs. Wyman and Walker. Mr. Colby's school was examined by Chester Adams. Forty-eight were present out of a total of seventy-four. This school has given the trustees much anxiety, but present out of the fifty-two enrolled. The captain did not commend the teacher or the school. The Trustees (continued from Volume IV., page 90). 1830, Rev. James Walker, Rev. Linus S. Everett, Chester Adams (president), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Benjamin Thompson, Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey. 1831, the same, except that Mr. Walker was succeeded by James K. Frothingham. 1832, Paul Willard, Esq., Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey, James K. Frothingham (president), Henry Jaques, Joseph F. Tufts. 1833, James K. Frothingham (president), Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Guy C. Hawkins, Jos
Robert G. Tenney (search for this): chapter 8
Charlestown schools after 1825. By Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) 1828-1829. The affairs of wards 3 and 6 were assigned to Robert G. Tenney, land of wards 4 and 5 to Luke Wyman. Miss Whittemore was appointed to school No. 4, Miss Stearns to No. 5, Miss Ward to No. 3, land Miss Gerrish to No. 6, tall for the summer ing known henceforth as No. 4, that at Milk Row as No. 5, the one in the Alewife Brook neighborhood as No. 6, and the one at the extremity of the town as No. 7. Mr. Tenney had the care of No. 4 and No. 5 Mr. Wyman of No. 6 and No. 7. The summer schools were examined Wednesday, October 14, and the teachers, according to this numy-four. This school has given the trustees much anxiety, but since it was under the present management it has improved, and appeared well at the examination. Captain Tenney examined No. 4 (Winter Hill). Thirty-five were present out of the fifty-two enrolled. The captain did not commend the teacher or the school. The Trustees
Linus S. Everett (search for this): chapter 8
's school was examined by Chester Adams. Forty-eight were present out of a total of seventy-four. This school has given the trustees much anxiety, but since it was under the present management it has improved, and appeared well at the examination. Captain Tenney examined No. 4 (Winter Hill). Thirty-five were present out of the fifty-two enrolled. The captain did not commend the teacher or the school. The Trustees (continued from Volume IV., page 90). 1830, Rev. James Walker, Rev. Linus S. Everett, Chester Adams (president), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Benjamin Thompson, Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey. 1831, the same, except that Mr. Walker was succeeded by James K. Frothingham. 1832, Paul Willard, Esq., Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey, James K. Frothingham (president), Henry Jaques, Joseph F. Tufts. 1833, James K. Frothingham (president), Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Guy C. Hawkins, Joseph F. Tufts, Charles
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