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Chestnut Court (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
ined, for one of them was tied to a broomstick when small to make it straight. The apple trees in the lower garden were moved from the grounds of N. E. Fitz on Winter Hill. Old apple trees a few steps up Summer street challenge inquiry. One of them, on what was once the Thomas Brackett place, was brought there, a good-sized tree, in 1852-3 or 4. In the fall of 1847, or the spring of 1848, fruit trees and an elm were set out on Harvard street, at the corner of the westerly part of Chestnut court, by Samuel Brackett. They probably came from some nursery. The tree next to the corner was set out by Lebbeus Stetson about 1850. The tree was quite large, and Mr. Stetson was laughed at when he insisted that it could be transplanted and live. The price paid for it was $6, and it was brought from a tract of land just across the railroad, very near the Franklin school. It out-topped the others in the court. The apple trees on Ezra Robinson's place near by, on Spring street, now o
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 9
s from the pen of a lifelong resident of Somerville, nearly, Lewis C. Flanagan:— Pine Island Pond. Tis even so; within our city's bounds We have a pond; not one with bottom paved And edges curbed with stone, but rough and plain From Nature's hand; nor large, nor deep, yet still A pond; and equi-distant from its shores An island stands; and though a modest lump Of earth, that may not be compared with those On which the salt waves lay their angry hands, By geographic rule as much an isle As Cuba's slope or Iceland's stormy pile. The urchin small, when asked to give at school Description of an isle, forgets his text; At which the teacher leads his truant mind To this, the spot which he himself has seen That very day; and though the growing boy Soon scorns to build upon domestic ground, But names some vasty pillar of the sea, The teacher tries again with younger minds, And smiles, perhaps, to see the lads refuse To own the step they once did gladly use. From out the turf a solitary
Round House (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
next to the corner was set out by Lebbeus Stetson about 1850. The tree was quite large, and Mr. Stetson was laughed at when he insisted that it could be transplanted and live. The price paid for it was $6, and it was brought from a tract of land just across the railroad, very near the Franklin school. It out-topped the others in the court. The apple trees on Ezra Robinson's place near by, on Spring street, now owned by John M. Woods, were good-sized trees in 1847. The well-known Round House, built by Enoch Robinson in 1850, has near it an elm set out by him soon after, and a double birch tree, which grew up of its own accord. A sweetbrier rose, brought from Polly Swamp, tempts the children in the springtime with its lovely blossoms. At the foot of Spring street a tree of Revolutionary date stood in front of the old Kent house. A large willow once grew near Pitman street, and was the scene of many good times remembered by scholars of the Franklin school. The girls used
Pine Island Pond (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
. As is often the case, at one time they wished to build a fire. The tree was still small, and, with unusual thoughtfulness, they inverted a barrel over it to protect it from the heat. Pond, tree, and island are now things of the past, and looking at the spot, now built over with houses, it is difficult to see where a local poet drew his inspiration for the following poem, one of many dainty productions from the pen of a lifelong resident of Somerville, nearly, Lewis C. Flanagan:— Pine Island Pond. Tis even so; within our city's bounds We have a pond; not one with bottom paved And edges curbed with stone, but rough and plain From Nature's hand; nor large, nor deep, yet still A pond; and equi-distant from its shores An island stands; and though a modest lump Of earth, that may not be compared with those On which the salt waves lay their angry hands, By geographic rule as much an isle As Cuba's slope or Iceland's stormy pile. The urchin small, when asked to give at school Descrip
Iceland (Iceland) (search for this): chapter 9
a lifelong resident of Somerville, nearly, Lewis C. Flanagan:— Pine Island Pond. Tis even so; within our city's bounds We have a pond; not one with bottom paved And edges curbed with stone, but rough and plain From Nature's hand; nor large, nor deep, yet still A pond; and equi-distant from its shores An island stands; and though a modest lump Of earth, that may not be compared with those On which the salt waves lay their angry hands, By geographic rule as much an isle As Cuba's slope or Iceland's stormy pile. The urchin small, when asked to give at school Description of an isle, forgets his text; At which the teacher leads his truant mind To this, the spot which he himself has seen That very day; and though the growing boy Soon scorns to build upon domestic ground, But names some vasty pillar of the sea, The teacher tries again with younger minds, And smiles, perhaps, to see the lads refuse To own the step they once did gladly use. From out the turf a solitary pine Sends up its
Clarendon Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ly along by the stone wall. A large elm further on, in front of an old house known as the Hall house, now demolished, still holds its own. There was an old elm tree at the junction of College avenue and Broadway. On Broadway, nearly up to Clarendon Hill, is a group of beautiful trees, which seem like an old-time family, with its patriarchs and young people. Some of these trees have doubtless seen the fortunes of more than a hundred years. The largest one is nearly opposite Simpson avenue, at down, and kept him busy talking till it was too dark. Next day there was other work, so the tree was spared. A small elm was removed from this locality by Lorenzo W. Dow about 1852, and stands, a notable tree, in his yard on the top of Clarendon Hill. On the golf grounds there is a stump of a chestnut tree, four or five feet long, and a yard in diameter, with new growth springing from the old root. The writer's theory in regard to this is, that it may have been a sapling left at the t
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
tall, illustrate an old proverb, amended, As the twig is un-bent, the tree is inclined, for one of them was tied to a broomstick when small to make it straight. The apple trees in the lower garden were moved from the grounds of N. E. Fitz on Winter Hill. Old apple trees a few steps up Summer street challenge inquiry. One of them, on what was once the Thomas Brackett place, was brought there, a good-sized tree, in 1852-3 or 4. In the fall of 1847, or the spring of 1848, fruit trees and school yard, now a playground, is well stocked with shade trees, which were set out under the supervision of the school committtee in 1849 or 1850. One of the scholars recollects that Deacon Charles Forster, so well remembered by residents of Winter Hill, was on the school committee and had a prominent part in the work. Another scholar remembers the willows at the foot of the yard in 1847. None are there now, but two or three peep over the high fence of the Bleachery, and a row of them proba
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
as a camp and drill-ground for soldiers, and was called Camp Cameron. A large elm on the sidewalk in front of the Baptist Church on College avenue is well on towards a hundred years old, according to one who remembers it as a large tree in his boyhood. It grew up naturally along by the stone wall. A large elm further on, in front of an old house known as the Hall house, now demolished, still holds its own. There was an old elm tree at the junction of College avenue and Broadway. On Broadway, nearly up to Clarendon Hill, is a group of beautiful trees, which seem like an old-time family, with its patriarchs and young people. Some of these trees have doubtless seen the fortunes of more than a hundred years. The largest one is nearly opposite Simpson avenue, and the trunk measures thirteen feet in circumference. A near-by resident says: It was a fine, spreading tree, whose branches came down nearly to the ground, so that the children of the Walnut Hill school used to swing on t
Martha E. Libby (search for this): chapter 9
nah C. Brown, Mr. Joseph H. Clark, Mr. Richard E. Cutter, Mrs. Mary J. Davis, Mrs. L. W. Dow, Miss Frances Dow, Mrs. Helen F. Edlefson, Mr. Charles D. Elliot, Mrs. Annie L. Fletcher, Mr. Ellsworth Fisk, Mr. N. E. Fitz, Hon. William H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Miss Anna P. Vinal, Miss Edith A. Woodman. (read before the Somerville Historical Society November 7, 1906.) Have we any old trees in Somerville? Yes, a g
Timothy Tufts (search for this): chapter 9
A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Miss Anna P. Vinal, Miss Edith A. Woodman. (read before the Somerville Historical Societyye is sometimes fond Of resting on the pine, the isle, the pond. Continuing up Elm street, we come to the home of Timothy Tufts. Here are two large elm trees which were set out by Mr. Tufts' grandfather before the Revolution. On a knoll severaMr. Tufts' grandfather before the Revolution. On a knoll several rods back from Elm street is another old elm, notable for its size and thrifty condition, which was set out at or soon after the time he built a modest cottage there at his marriage in 1761. The tree is best seen from Banks street. Inquiry brings out the existence of another tree, a pear tree still bearing, which was also set out by Mr. Tufts' grandfather. A very large red cedar, whose trunk was more than a foot in diameter, once grew on Willow avenue not far away. From Willow avenue to
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