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Hundred and Fourth New York pickets. August 4. All quiet on the skirmish line. I was relieved from picket at 8 P. M. This day was appointed as a National Fast, and a religious meeting was held in the fort. (I succumb to toothache.) August 5. Turned out at 6 A. M. (I had five teeth filled with lead by a private in One Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania.) From 4 to 6 heavy firing. August 6. Another quiet day. Sunday, August 7. We had an inspection, as was usually the custom on Sundays. August 8. Pleasant, but a very warm day. August 9. Cloudy, with thunder, but no rain for us. August 10. A quiet day. August 11. I was detailed for picket at 8 P. M. August 12. Everything was quiet on the picket line. A Rebel came into our line, who said he was from Cambridge, Mass. I sent him to the rear as a prisoner of war. He stated that he was in Richmond the Sunday before. Probably he was a bounty-jumper. I was relieved at 8 P. M. August 13. Heavy firing o
It was then ordered to the left as support to the Sixth Corps, but as no attack was made, it returned to camp about 9 P. M. March 29. The spring campaign was entered upon. The Regiment broke camp about 3 A. M., and was marched to the left till Boynton Plank Road was reached. After some skirmishing the enemy was driven back from here and their lines taken. This position was held through the next day, the Regiment remaining in skirmish line during the whole time until the morning of the 31st, when a move was made still farther to the left to a point near Gravelly Run. Here the enemy was found in strong force. They attacked us, and our Regiment was sent out hurriedly as skirmishers to check them until the lines could be formed. This, however, proved impossible, and after suffering heavily, the men were obliged to fall back, leaving many dead and wounded on the field. (They were the designated skirmish regiment of the Brigade.) Lieutenant-Colonel Tremlett was wounded early in t
February 6th (search for this): chapter 1
7. The line of battle was formed at 8 A. M. Our Regiment was deployed as skirmishers in front of the Brigade. They advanced and drove the enemy's skirmishers from three lines of rifle pits back into their works, which were near. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon our line was ordered to advance upon them, but as the assault was not successful, the line fell back to its original position, where it remained, exposed to a galling fire till late at night, when it was relieved. At Hatcher's Run February 6 and 7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old camp near Jerusalem Plank Road to get the baggage of the men. It then broke camp and took a new position at the extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters.
February 7th (search for this): chapter 1
d in strong works near Dabney's Mills. The first attempt to dislodge them was unsuccessful, but a second charge took the works, which, however, were abandoned for want of support; the troops recrossed the river and bivouacked for the night. February 7. The line of battle was formed at 8 A. M. Our Regiment was deployed as skirmishers in front of the Brigade. They advanced and drove the enemy's skirmishers from three lines of rifle pits back into their works, which were near. At 5 o'clock in our line was ordered to advance upon them, but as the assault was not successful, the line fell back to its original position, where it remained, exposed to a galling fire till late at night, when it was relieved. At Hatcher's Run February 6 and 7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old c
February 8th (search for this): chapter 1
d and drove the enemy's skirmishers from three lines of rifle pits back into their works, which were near. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon our line was ordered to advance upon them, but as the assault was not successful, the line fell back to its original position, where it remained, exposed to a galling fire till late at night, when it was relieved. At Hatcher's Run February 6 and 7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old camp near Jerusalem Plank Road to get the baggage of the men. It then broke camp and took a new position at the extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Oth
February 9th (search for this): chapter 1
from three lines of rifle pits back into their works, which were near. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon our line was ordered to advance upon them, but as the assault was not successful, the line fell back to its original position, where it remained, exposed to a galling fire till late at night, when it was relieved. At Hatcher's Run February 6 and 7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old camp near Jerusalem Plank Road to get the baggage of the men. It then broke camp and took a new position at the extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated
February 10th (search for this): chapter 1
r. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon our line was ordered to advance upon them, but as the assault was not successful, the line fell back to its original position, where it remained, exposed to a galling fire till late at night, when it was relieved. At Hatcher's Run February 6 and 7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old camp near Jerusalem Plank Road to get the baggage of the men. It then broke camp and took a new position at the extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated in the review. [It may be mentioned here that General Robinson la
March 9th (search for this): chapter 1
7 E. B. Hadley was killed and Ambrose W. Coles lost an arm. J. W. Oliver was captured for the second time. February 8. In bivouac all day. February 9. The Regiment was on picket, and when relieved Friday (February 10) it returned to its old camp near Jerusalem Plank Road to get the baggage of the men. It then broke camp and took a new position at the extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated in the review. [It may be mentioned here that General Robinson later on was lieutenant-governor of New York, and was present at a regimental reunion held at Somerville in 1887. He has since died.] March 14. A review of the whole Fifth Corps took place before Major-General Warren. March 16. There was another review before Secretary of
March 14th (search for this): chapter 1
he extreme left of the new line, near Hatcher's Run. A camp was laid out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated in the review. [It may be mentioned here that General Robinson later on was lieutenant-governor of New York, and was present at a regimental reunion held at Somerville in 1887. He has since died.] March 14. A review of the whole Fifth Corps took place before Major-General Warren. March 16. There was another review before Secretary of War Stanton. On each of these occasions the Thirty-ninth Regiment acquitted itself well. Saturday, March 25. The Regiment was ordered out about daylight to go to the right and assist in re-capturing Fort Stedman, which had just been taken by the enemy. The division marched back, and near the Gurley House was reviewed by President Lincoln. It was then
March 16th (search for this): chapter 1
egan once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated in the review. [It may be mentioned here that General Robinson later on was lieutenant-governor of New York, and was present at a regimental reunion held at Somerville in 1887. He has since died.] March 14. A review of the whole Fifth Corps took place before Major-General Warren. March 16. There was another review before Secretary of War Stanton. On each of these occasions the Thirty-ninth Regiment acquitted itself well. Saturday, March 25. The Regiment was ordered out about daylight to go to the right and assist in re-capturing Fort Stedman, which had just been taken by the enemy. The division marched back, and near the Gurley House was reviewed by President Lincoln. It was then ordered to the left as support to the Sixth Corps, but as no attack was made, it returne
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