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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910. Search the whole document.

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Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
vira Elliot, 1901; obituaries, Hon. Charles Hicks Saunders and Hon. Isaac Story, Historic Leaves, Vol. 1, July, 1902; The Stinted Common, Historic Leaves, Vol. 1, October, 1902; inscription for Prospect Hill Tower, Historic Leaves, Vol. 2, January, 1904; John Winthrop, Historic Leaves, Vol. 3, July, 1904; obituary, Quincy Adams Vinal, Historic Leaves, Vol. 3, October, 1904; The Blessing of the Bay, read before the Winter Hill Improvement Association, November 16, 1904; The Old Royall House, Medford, Historic Leaves, Vol. 4, April, 1905; Union Square and Its Neighborhood About the Year 1846, Historic Leaves, Vol. 6, April, 1907; Somerville's Development and Progress, Somerville Journal, May 3, 1907; Union Square Before the War, Historic Leaves, Vol. 6, July, 1907; Port Hudson, Historic Leaves, Vol. 7, October, 1908; Charles Tufts, read before the Somerville Historial Society November 24, 1908; Sketch of George O. Brastow, Somerville Journal, December 13, 1908. Mr. Elliot became a me
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
achusetts Volunteers, and some time city engineer of Charlestown. They had offices in Winnisimmet Square, Chelsea, and in Somerville. In 1862 he was in the office of J. G. Chase, C. E., later city engineer of Cambridge, and was most of the time engaged in running levels, establishing benches, and making plans for sewers; also in making preliminary studies and plans for the Charlestown Water Works. During the year he drew for General Henry L. Abbot, of Cambridge, a plan of the siege of Yorktown, Va., from notes by General Abbot. The execution of the plan so pleased the general that he procured for Mr. Elliot an appointment from the War Department as Assistant Topographical Engineer. (See next paper for Mr. Elliot's war record.) In January, 1865, Mr. Elliot removed to Cambridge, Mass., and entered the office of William S. Barbour. During the year he was engaged in making railroad surveys from the limestone quarries to the lime kilns at Rockland, Me. During 1866 and 1867 he
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
gestion the Somerville Journal was launched. Previous to and during the winter of 1870-1871 he attended afternoon and evening lectures on chemistry, and engaged in laboratory work in mechanical and mining engineering, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During 1871-1872 he was chief engineer of the Arlington Water Works, and in 1872 was elected the first city engineer of the newly-incorporated city of Somerville. In 1873 he was engaged in private practice, and employed by Middlesex County in the widening of Somerville Avenue and the re-location of the horse railroad from the side to the centre of the avenue, and the adjustment of the damages incurred by the widening. He was re-appointed city engineer in 1874 and 1875. Among the important engineering works carried on under Mr. Elliot as city engineer were the construction of the newly-widened Somerville Avenue, the construction of the Somerville part of the sewerage system for abolishing the Miller's River nuisance, whi
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ion Square Before the War, Historic Leaves, Vol. 6, July, 1907; Port Hudson, Historic Leaves, Vol. 7, October, 1908; Charles Tufts, read before the Somerville Historial Society November 24, 1908; Sketch of George O. Brastow, Somerville Journal, December 13, 1908. Mr. Elliot became a member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers December 17, 1902. He was also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers from August 7, 1872, to January 4, 1898; the National Geographic Society; Massachusetts Real Estate Exchange; Somerville Board of Trade, in which he took a very active part, and to which he devoted much of his valuable time. He was a member of the Men's Club of the First Universalist Church; the Winter Hill Improvement Association; the American Historical Association; New England Historic Genealogical Society; Sons of the American Revolution; and Delft Haven Colony of the Pilgrim Fathers. Charles Darwin Elliot and Emily Jane, adopted daughter of Judge Nathaniel F. Hyer,
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nge; Somerville Board of Trade, in which he took a very active part, and to which he devoted much of his valuable time. He was a member of the Men's Club of the First Universalist Church; the Winter Hill Improvement Association; the American Historical Association; New England Historic Genealogical Society; Sons of the American Revolution; and Delft Haven Colony of the Pilgrim Fathers. Charles Darwin Elliot and Emily Jane, adopted daughter of Judge Nathaniel F. Hyer, were married in New Orleans, La., September 3, 1863. Five children were born of this union. He is survived by Mrs. Elliot; a brother, Alfred L. Elliot; a sister, Mary Elvira Elliot; and four children, Clara Zenora, Ella Florence, a professional genealogist, Charles Joseph, a civil engineer, and Adelaide Genevieve. The son was associated with his father in the engineering business, and has succeeded to his practice. Mr. Elliot was very ill during the winter of 1907-08. It was thought he had fully recovered from t
Wrentham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Memoir. By J. Albert Holmes, Member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. Charles D. Elliot was educated in the schools of Foxboro, Wrentham, Malden, and in the old Milk Row School and the Prospect Hill Grammar School, Somerville, Mass., and in Henry Munroe's private school on Walnut Street, this city, which he left to enter, at the age of twelve years, the Hopkins Classical School, situated at that time on the south side of Main Street, now Massachusetts Avenue, a few rods westerly from Dana Street, Cambridge. This school was in existence from 1840 to 1854, and was supported from a fund left by Edward Hopkins, for a grammar school in Cambridge. The teacher during Mr. Elliot's attendance was Edmund B. Whitman. Mr. Elliot was a member of the first entering class of the Somerville High School. The front portion of the present Somerville City Hall was built and dedicated April 28, 1852, as a high school. The school from 1852 to 1867 occupied the upper floor, and afterwards,
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
. Historical papers. Between February 8 and August 9, 1890, he contributed to the Somerville Journal nine articles on the following subjects: Revolutionary Landmarks; Aborigines; The First National Flag; Paul Revere's Ride and the March to Concord; British Retreat from Concord; Battle of Bunker Hill; Old Roads; Historic Tablets; Historic Somerville; and, following these, The Early History of Ten Hills Farm, Somerville Journal, November 8, 1890, and May 23, 1891; Somerville in War Times, aConcord; Battle of Bunker Hill; Old Roads; Historic Tablets; Historic Somerville; and, following these, The Early History of Ten Hills Farm, Somerville Journal, November 8, 1890, and May 23, 1891; Somerville in War Times, and Early History of Somerville, Somerville Journal, Semi-Centennial Souvenir, March 3, 1892; a brief History of Somerville, in Somerville Past and Present, 1896; The Somerville Historical Society, Myles Standish and the Plymouth Explorers, Governor John Winthrop and His Ten Hills Farm, Somerville in the Revolution, all in Somerville Historical Society Souvenir, November 38- December 3, 1898; Genealogical Pamphlet, Charles Darwin Elliot-Mary Elvira Elliot, 1901; obituaries, Hon. Charles Hicks Sa
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
was the use of plate armor for ships. He invented, shortly before the introduction of ironclads, a device for drawing copper bolts from ships so as to preserve the bolts; this device was patented. Still another practical idea of which he talked, as early as 1869 or 1870, was that of perforated pipes to be built into walls and partitions, and to be connected with the hose in case of fire. A patent for some such device has since been granted. Mr. Elliot removed in the spring of 1867 to Brookline, and in the autumn of the same year to Newton Centre, Mass. In 1868 he was in the office of J. F. Fuller, engineer for the Boston Water Power Company, where he was engaged upon sewers and other engineering work in the Back Bay. He formed a partnership in 1869 with William A. Mason, C. E., of Cambridge, and during 1869-70 was engaged in general engineering, street and land improvement, and the construction of the famous Beacon Trotting Park in Allston, now occupied by the Boston & Albany
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ffice of J. F. Fuller, engineer for the Boston Water Power Company, where he was engaged upon sewers and other engineering work in the Back Bay. He formed a partnership in 1869 with William A. Mason, C. E., of Cambridge, and during 1869-70 was engaged in general engineering, street and land improvement, and the construction of the famous Beacon Trotting Park in Allston, now occupied by the Boston & Albany Railroad roundhouse and yards. In April, 1870, he removed from Newton Centre to Cambridgeport, and in December of the same year returned to Somerville, where he opened an office in the newly-constructed Pythian Block, Union Square. It was at this time, when asked by Ira Hill, the owner of the block, whom he would suggest as an occupant for the only remaining office in the building, that Mr. Elliot proposed that a newspaper be started, and upon this suggestion the Somerville Journal was launched. Previous to and during the winter of 1870-1871 he attended afternoon and evening le
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
, and making plans for sewers; also in making preliminary studies and plans for the Charlestown Water Works. During the year he drew for General Henry L. Abbot, of Cambridge, a plan of the siege of Yorktown, Va., from notes by General Abbot. The execution of the plan so pleased the general that he procured for Mr. Elliot an appointment from the War Department as Assistant Topographical Engineer. (See next paper for Mr. Elliot's war record.) In January, 1865, Mr. Elliot removed to Cambridge, Mass., and entered the office of William S. Barbour. During the year he was engaged in making railroad surveys from the limestone quarries to the lime kilns at Rockland, Me. During 1866 and 1867 he was engaged in the manufacture of paper collars and cuffs, for which much of the machinery used was either invented or improved by Mr. Elliot, and all the patterns and designs used were his own. He was possessed of considerable inventive genius. Besides the machinery previously mentioned, he p
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