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on as ever walked the earth. His religion was a reality, and not a pretense or a cover. He lived in Charlestown before he came to Somerville. It was related of him at the time by a Charlestown baker that his bill against Mr. Forster in one year for bread was over four hundred dollars, not one loaf of which went to his own house. Of late years his house has been owned and occupied by Mrs. E. R. Sawyer, but has now been removed to the rear. One rangeway more, now Central street. On the first corner stood a house owned and occupied by Edmund Tufts,—the first treasurer of Somerville,—and his sister, Abby Tufts. The house is now a thing of the past. The next house was owned and occupied by John C. Magoun, for many years an assessor of the town and city of Somerville. The house is still standing, and is occupied by one of his daughters. Next came the unfinished brick house of Samuel Welch, about which so many romantic stories have been told. The next was the Powder House, with
factors, and their outward manifestations were given full credence. The rule and gauge cannot be applied to the soul of a man. The regiment reported at Faneuil hall April 20 to partially complete equipment, and on Sunday morning, April 21, 1861, headed by resounding music, marched to the Boston & Albany station, and was soon en route for New York. I was in this campaign a tourist, with a musket, enjoying the rank and emoluments of a private. We embarked for the South on a steamer on the 22nd, were quartered mainly in the hold upon loose hay, among artillery caissons, and reached Washington via Annapolis about the 26th, and were quartered in the Treasury building until the last days of May. We participated honorably in the Bull Run campaign. The battle of that name, July 21, 1861, was hotly contested for three hours. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded exceeded ours, and their army could have been fought the following day at Centreville, ten miles distant. The result was a di
, on the seventeenth of March, 1865, to City Point, Va., to do provost duty. We remained there until April 14, when we were sent to Burkesville. On May 2 we started for Washington, via Richmond. We camped at Arlington Heights and at Fairfax Seminary, near Alexandria, remaining there until orders to send us home were received. We took part in the grand review of the Army of the Potomac in Washington on May 23, and on June 25 we started for Massachusetts, reaching Readville on the twenty-eighth. I finally received my pay and discharge July 20, 1865, having worn the blue for one year, six months, and one week. My experience in the service was similar to that of thousands of others. I was more fortunate than many, for I had no severe sicknesses, escaped being wounded, and did not get taken prisoner. It was not pleasant to march all day in a storm, and then lie down in the mud at night to try and sleep, and it was not pleasant to go hungry; but to undergo such discomforts wa
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 18
chard Hadley; March 28, Governor Winthrop and His Mansion on the Mistick, Charles D. Elliot; April 11, banquet; April 25, Colonial Architecture George F. Loring; May 8, Curiosities of Colonial Law, Thomas F. O'Malley; May 22, The Tufts Family Dr. Edward C. Booth. 1900-1901: December 5, reading from and discussion of Neighborhood Sketches, furnished the Society by old residents; December 19, History of Ten Hills Farm, with Anecdotes and Reminiscences, Mrs. Alida G. Sellers (born Jaques); January 2, With Grant at the Battle of the Wilderness, Colonel Elijah Walker; January 16, An Incident of Anti-Slavery Times in Syracuse, N. Y., by Charles Carroll Dawson, of Toledo, O., (corresponding member of Somerville Historical Society), read by Howard Dawson; January 30, The Old Royal House and Farm, J. H. Hooper, President Medford Historical Society; February 4, stated meeting of the Society; February 13, William Pierce, Captain of Ships Ann Mayflower and Lion George E. Littlefield; February
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 18
, An Evening with Sam Walter Foss; April 13, An Address Commemorative of the Battle of Lexington, Rev. C. A. Staples, Lexington; April 27, Schools of Somerville in the Olden Time, Mary A. Haley; The Teaching of Local History in Our Schools, John S. Emerson. 1899-1900: November 15, The Old Middlesex Canal, L. L. Dame, Medford; December 6, John Mallett, Florence E. Carr; December 20, History of Tufts College, President E. H. Capen; The Possibilities of the Public Library, Sam Walter Foss; January 3, Somerville as I Have Known It, Mrs. Amelia Wood; January 17, Four Satirists of the Revolution, Howrard Dawson; History of Journalism in Somerville, Barbara Galpin; January 31, Battlefields of the Revolution, Elbridge S. Brooks; February 14, Reminiscences of Army Life in 1861-1864 Elias H. Marston; Work of the Engineer Corps in the Army of the Potomac Darwin C. Pavey; February 28, Somerville Soldiers in the Rebellion Colonel Edwin C. Bennett; Some Phases of Woman's National Work Mary E. E
January 8th (search for this): chapter 1
, but he was not voluminous at the expense of accuracy and painstaking labor. He had a genius for hard work. Somerville was honored in being the residence of such a man. He sent out work from here that traveled far and reached many firesides. Thousands knew him through his books and called his books good. We who knew the man also call his books good; but we call the man better than his books. At a meeting of the council of the Somerville Historical Society, held Wednesday evening, January 8, to take action on the death of Elbridge S. Brooks, first vice-president of the society, a committee, consisting of President John F. Ayer, ex-President Charles D. Elliot, and Vice-President L. B. Pillsbury, was appointed to represent the society at the funeral; a committee was also appointed to prepare a suitable memorial of the deceased. Under the auspices of this society a memorial service was held Sunday afternoon, February 16, in the Unitarian church, on Highland avenue, in honor
January 8th (search for this): chapter 18
3, With the Army of the Potomac, 1864, George B. Clark; January 13, What Historic Comsiderations Lead to, Mrs. M. D. Frazar; January 27, Minor Causes of the Revolution, Walter A. Ladd; February 10, Somerville Fire Department and Somerville Fires, J. R. Hopkins; February 24, Old-Time School Books, Frank M. Hawes; March 10, Department of the Gulf, Levi L. Hawes; March 24, Recollections of Somerville, John R. Poor, Boston. 1902-1903: November 13, Middlesex Canal, Herbert P. Yeaton, Chillicothe, O., (read by Miss Sara A. Stone); November 20, Separation of Church and State in Massachusetts, Charles W. Ludden, Medford; December 18, Early Schools of Somerville, Frank M. Hawes; January 8, Neighborhood Sketch, Quincy A. Vinal; Reminiscences, Timothy Tufts; January 29, Literary Men and Women of Somerville, Professor D. L. Maulsby; February 19, Reminiscences of Old Charlestown, Hon. S. Z. Bowman; March 12, Four Score and Eight-Old Time Memories, Nathan L. Pennock. Temple House—Ten Hills
January 10th (search for this): chapter 1
ng the floral tributes were those from the Somerville Historical Society, and a wreath of violets and roses from a few of the many Somerville boys who loved his books. After the services the remains were taken to Mount Auburn for cremation. The pall-bearers were Irving Bacheller, Frank Hoyt, Henry Morill, the last two representing the Lothrop company, and Arthur T. Kidder, of Somerville. The following is from the tribute of Sam Walter Foss. It appeared in the Somerville Journal for January 10, and our biographical sketch of Mr. Brooks is also quoted from that paper:— Elbridge Streeter Brooks as a writer and friend The death of Elbridge S. Brooks will be lamented throughout the English-reading world; for he was an author of established fame, at the height of his productive period, with an apparent prospect of producing as many good books in the future as he had already produced in the past. The gulf stream of his life had not as yet flowed into the Arctic winter of age.
January 13th (search for this): chapter 18
edford Historical Society; March 13, The Old Medford Turnpike, with Glimpses of the Brickmakers, John F. Ayer; March 27, The Ursuline Convent, Mt. Benedict, President Charles D. Elliot. 1901-1902: November 11, Five Years in New Mexico, Colonel E. C. Bennett; November 25, Elizur Wright—the Fells, Miss Ellen M. Wright, Medford; December 2, business meeting; December 9, Historic Trees in and About Boston, Miss Sara A. Stone; December 23, With the Army of the Potomac, 1864, George B. Clark; January 13, What Historic Comsiderations Lead to, Mrs. M. D. Frazar; January 27, Minor Causes of the Revolution, Walter A. Ladd; February 10, Somerville Fire Department and Somerville Fires, J. R. Hopkins; February 24, Old-Time School Books, Frank M. Hawes; March 10, Department of the Gulf, Levi L. Hawes; March 24, Recollections of Somerville, John R. Poor, Boston. 1902-1903: November 13, Middlesex Canal, Herbert P. Yeaton, Chillicothe, O., (read by Miss Sara A. Stone); November 20, Separation of
January 16th (search for this): chapter 18
les D. Elliot; April 11, banquet; April 25, Colonial Architecture George F. Loring; May 8, Curiosities of Colonial Law, Thomas F. O'Malley; May 22, The Tufts Family Dr. Edward C. Booth. 1900-1901: December 5, reading from and discussion of Neighborhood Sketches, furnished the Society by old residents; December 19, History of Ten Hills Farm, with Anecdotes and Reminiscences, Mrs. Alida G. Sellers (born Jaques); January 2, With Grant at the Battle of the Wilderness, Colonel Elijah Walker; January 16, An Incident of Anti-Slavery Times in Syracuse, N. Y., by Charles Carroll Dawson, of Toledo, O., (corresponding member of Somerville Historical Society), read by Howard Dawson; January 30, The Old Royal House and Farm, J. H. Hooper, President Medford Historical Society; February 4, stated meeting of the Society; February 13, William Pierce, Captain of Ships Ann Mayflower and Lion George E. Littlefield; February 27, Peter Faneuil and His Gift, Abram English Brown, President Bedford Histori
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