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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier).

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hich was bright and pleasant. Uncle soon found a friend of his, a Mr. Weare, who, with his wife, was to go to his home, at Hampton, that dayed, red, and gray, the last having a large, spreading tail, which Mr. Weare told me they do use as a sail, to catch the wind, that it may bloed birds, made the ride wonderfully pleasant and entertaining. Mr. Weare, on the way, told me that there was a great talk of the bewitchintalking man, but nowise of a wizard. The thing most against him, Mr. Weare said, was this: that he did deny at the first that the house was missioners then sitting, came out to meet me, bidding me go on to Mr. Weare's house, whither he would follow me when the Court did adjourn. her of mine old acquaintance, Robert. Went in the evening with Mistress Weare and her maiden sister to see a young girl in the neighborhood, er sooner than the hanging of all the old women in the Colony. Mistress Weare says this is not the first time the Evil Spirit hath been at wo
nt saith not. Taken on oath before the Commissioners of Hampton, the 8th of the 2nd mo., 1656. William Fuller. Henry Dow. Vera copea: Thos. Bradbury, Recorder. Sworn before, the 4th of September, 1656, Edward Rawson. Thomas Philbrick testifieth that Goody Cole told him that if any of his calves did eat of her grass, she hoped it would poison them; and it fell out that one never came home again, and the other coming home died soon after. Henry Morelton's wife and Goodwife Sleeper depose that, talking about Goody Cole and Marston's child, they did hear a great scraping against the boards of the window, which was not done by a cat or dog. Thomas Coleman's wife testifies that Goody Cole did repeat to another the very words which passed between herself and her husband, in their own house, in private; and Thomas Ormsby, the constable of Salisbury, testifies, that when he did strip Eunice Cole of her shift, to be whipped, by the judgment of the Court at Salisbury, he s
odfrey told him it had been rendered into the English tongue, and printed some years before in the Massachusetts Bay; and asked him if he did accuse such men as Mr. Cotton and Mr. Wilson, and the pious ministers of their day, of heresy. Nay, quoth the minister, they did see the heresy of the book, and, on their condemning it, thefriends, albeit he had no malice towards any one, and was always ready to do a good, even to his enemies. He once even greatly angered his old and true friend, Mr. Cotton of Boston. It fell out in this wise, said Mr. Ward. When the arch heretic and fanatic Gorton and his crew were in prison in Boston, my father and Mr. Cotton weMr. Cotton went to the jail window to see them; and after some little discourse with them, he told Gorton that if he had done or said anything which he could with a clear conscience renounce, he would do well to recant the same, and the Court, he doubted not, would be merciful; adding, that it would be no disparagement for him to do so, as the
I was but a child in years and knowledge, and he a wise and learned man; but if he would not deem it forward in me, I would fain know whether the Scripture did anywhere lay down the particular fashion of wearing the hair. Mr. Wigglesworth said that there were certain general rules laid down, from which we might make a right application to particular cases. The wearing of long hair by men is expressly forbidden in 1 Corinthians XI. 14, 15; and there is a special word for women, also, in 1 Tim. II. 9. Hereupon Aunt Rawson told me she thought I was well answered; but I (foolish one that I was), being unwilling to give up the matter so, ventured further to say that there were the Nazarites, spoken of in Numbers VI. 5, upon whose heads, by the appointment of God, no razor was to come. Nay, said Mr. Wigglesworth, that was by a special appointment only, and proveth the general rule and practice. Uncle Rawson said that long hair might, he judged, be lawfully worn, where the bodi
Roger Williams (search for this): chapter 2
t God hath made of one blood all mankind. I was specially minded of a saying of that ingenious but schismatic man, Mr. Roger Williams, in the little book which he put forth in England on the Indian tongue:— Boast not, proud English, of thy birth anemper and spirits. May 16. This place is in what is called the Narragansett country, and about twenty miles from Mr. Williams's town of Providence, a place of no small note. Mr. Williams, who is now an aged man, more than fourscore, was the foMr. Williams, who is now an aged man, more than fourscore, was the founder of the Province, and is held in great esteem by the people, who be of all sects and persuasions, as the Government doth not molest any in worshipping according to conscience; and hence you will see in the same neighborhood Anabaptists, Quakers, New Lights, Brownists, Antinomians, and Socinians,—nay, I am told there be Papists also. Mr. Williams is a Baptist, and holdeth mainly with Calvin and Beza, as respects the decrees, and hath been a bitter reviler of the Quakers, although he hath o
d did quite overcome Goodwife Morse, she being a weakly woman, so that she had to be carried out of the meeting. It being cold weather, and a damp easterly wind keeping me within doors, I have been looking over with uncle his papers about the Hampton witch, Eunice Cole, who was twice tried for her mischiefs; and I incline to copy some of them, as I know they will be looked upon as worthy of record by my dear Cousin Oliver and mine other English friends. I find that as long ago as the year 1656, this same Eunice Cole was complained of, and many witnesses did testify to her wickedness. Here followeth some of the evidence on the first trial:— The deposition of Goody Marston and Goodwife Susanna Palmer, who, being sworn, sayeth, that Goodwife Cole saith that she was sure there was a witch in town, and that she knew where he dwelt, and who they are, and that thirteen years ago she knew one bewitched as Goodwife Marston's child was, and she was sure that party was bewitched, for
Thomas called on us, and with him came also a Mr. Sewall, and the minister of the church, Mr. Richar, and besprinkled with pale, white flowers. Mr. Sewall pointed out to us the different kinds of tresked him if he ever heard the verses writ by Mr. Sewall concerning the killing of Blind Will. And was ordered to be set in the stocks; but this Mr. Sewall, Robert Pike, and my brother would by no meashe should not be whipped. August 1. Captain Sewall, R. Pike, and the minister, Mr. Richardson, at our house to-day. Captain Sewall, who lives mostly at Boston, says that a small vessel loaded themselves. Mr. Atkinson's Indian, said Captain Sewall, whom he bought of a Virginia ship-owner, . The selling of beer and strong liquors, Mr. Sewall says, hath much increased since the troublesnd. By a letter from Newbury, brought me by Mr. Sewall, who hath just returned from that place, I hMorse hath been bound for trial as a witch. Mr. Sewall tells me the woman is now in the Boston jail[5 more...]
John Eliot (search for this): chapter 2
ing thereof. February 14. The famous Mr. John Eliot, having business with my uncle, spent the of the Province: both the Major and his friend Eliot being great sticklers for the rights and libernd seditious doctrines charged upon it, said Mr. Eliot, but for the book itself, rightly taken, ande time, Rebecca found means to draw the good Mr. Eliot into some account of his labors and journeyshis enchantments and witcheries. I asked Mr. Eliot whether he did know of any women who were Pouffer all manner of hardships. There was, Mr. Eliot told us, a famous Powah, who, coming to Punkg, or spake the right words; which coming to Mr. Eliot's ear, he made him confess, in the presence some further discourse, our guests left us, Mr. Eliot kindly inviting me to visit his Indian congra very bright and pretty Indian girl, one of Mr. Eliot's flock, of the Natick people. She was appaill, and had died the next day; and although Mr. Eliot, when he was told of it, laid the blame ther
her I went along with mine Uncle and Aunt Rawson, and many others, to attend the ordination of Mr. Brock, in the place of the worthy Mr. Hough, lately deceased. The weather being clear, and the travd hath the reputation of good scholarship and lively wit. He told some rare stories concerning Mr. Brock, the minister ordained, and of the marvellous efficacy of his prayers. He mentioned, among other things, that, when Mr. Brock lived on the Isles of Shoals, he persuaded the people there to agree to spend one day in a month, beside the Sabbath, in religious worship. Now, it so chanced that tding fair, that his congregation did desire him to put off the meeting, that they might fish. Mr. Brock tried in vain to reason with them, and show the duty of seeking first the kingdom of God, whenrrying people to meeting in his boat, lost the same in a storm, and came lamenting his loss to Mr. Brock. Go home, honest man, said the minister. I will mention your case to the Lord: you will have
Thomas Coleman (search for this): chapter 2
worn before, the 4th of September, 1656, Edward Rawson. Thomas Philbrick testifieth that Goody Cole told him that if any of his calves did eat of her grass, she hoped it would poison them; and it fell out that one never came home again, and the other coming home died soon after. Henry Morelton's wife and Goodwife Sleeper depose that, talking about Goody Cole and Marston's child, they did hear a great scraping against the boards of the window, which was not done by a cat or dog. Thomas Coleman's wife testifies that Goody Cole did repeat to another the very words which passed between herself and her husband, in their own house, in private; and Thomas Ormsby, the constable of Salisbury, testifies, that when he did strip Eunice Cole of her shift, to be whipped, by the judgment of the Court at Salisbury, he saw a witch's mark under her left breast. Moreover, one Abra. Drake doth depose and say, that this Goody Cole threatened that the hand of God would be against his cattle, and
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