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Stettin (Poland) (search for this): chapter 9
of Dannemora; —of which Mary will give you a description all in good time. We already begin to think of leaving Stockholm—and shall probably take the steamboat to Gothenburg in about three weeks.—For my own part, I should like to go sooner if we could. I am disappointed in Sweden. The climate is too cold and unpleasant. I want a little warm sunshine. Something that I can feel, as well as see. From Gothenburg we shall go to Copenhagen, and after passing a month there, take steamboat to Stettin, and so to Berlin. We shall not return to the North again but pass the next summer in Germany and France. Much love to all. Very affectionately your Son H. W. Longfellow Mrs. Stephen Longfellow, care of Hon. Stephen Longfellow, Portland, Maine, U. S. of America. [to] Hon. Stephen Longfellow, Portland, Maine, U. S. Of America. Copenhagen, September 21, 1835. my dear Sir,—Henry has consented that I should copy a few pages of his journal for you; but I could not prevail on him to
Brussels (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 9
s cabin, & the cabin was entirely filled with hammocks swung one above another.—Thursday. 10. Arrived in Copenhagen at 2 P. M. Found good accommodations at the Hotel Royal. Monday. 14. Mr. Appleton & Mary G—left us, for London. Tuesday. 15. In the morning went over the new palace, not yet entirely completed. It is a fine building, the rooms very neat, most of them carpeted. The carpet English, & upon the king's apartments of the most ordinary & coarsest Kidderminster. The Queen's were Brussels, but nothing extraordinary. In one large room was the king's throne—A gilded chair covered with crimson velvet, & his initials worked in gold upon it. The platform, & the steps by which you ascend to it, were also covered with crimson velvet. The window-curtains were superb—of crimson velvet & a gold vine wrought upon the edge of them. The Queen's apartments were more splendid than the king's. She had also a room similar to the king's, with a throne like his & curtains the same. The d
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t however there was very little true rejoicing in all this show & splendour. The Queen is very unpopular among the people. Friday morn'g—Willis called. He had been to breakfast with the beautiful Mrs. Wadsworth, & was on his way, to breakfast at 3 in the aft. with the Duchess of St. Albans. Mrs. Wadsworth, from Genesseo, was a Philadelphia lady & has been greatly admired on the continent & here. She returns in a few days to America. Yesterday morning Mr. Barnard a young lawyer from Connecticut called upon me. He arrived but a month before us, & takes much the same route as we do, though a more extensive one. He will be in Stockholm in the course of the summer. Mr. Carlyle of Craigenputtock was soon after announced, & passed an half hour with us much to our delight. He has very unpolished manners, & broad Scottish accent, but such fine language & beautiful thoughts that it is truly delightful to listen to him. Perhaps you have read some of his articles in the Edinburgh Review
Croydon (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
her, acknowledging the receipt of your kind letter. I hope that you will write us as often as your many cares will permit, & be assured that even a few lines will always be welcomed with delight by your absent children. We have passed our time very delightfully in London. The only difficulty is—there is so much to be seen & so little time to see it in. We have, however, seen many of the principal points. Last Monday we passed very delightfully at Shirley Park, near the little village of Croydon. The ride is through a very beautiful country. We passed several gipsy encampments, in the most picturesque situations. Shirley Park is a truly delightful place. The house, which is a very fine one, is placed on a beautiful spot, & there are fine views from all sides of it. Mrs. Skinner, the lady of the place, is a very agreeable amiable lady—She took us all over the grounds in her carriage, & was very kind & attentive to us. Her house is thronged with visitors, the great, the fashiona
Kidderminster (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
ged to sleep in the gentleman's cabin, & the cabin was entirely filled with hammocks swung one above another.—Thursday. 10. Arrived in Copenhagen at 2 P. M. Found good accommodations at the Hotel Royal. Monday. 14. Mr. Appleton & Mary G—left us, for London. Tuesday. 15. In the morning went over the new palace, not yet entirely completed. It is a fine building, the rooms very neat, most of them carpeted. The carpet English, & upon the king's apartments of the most ordinary & coarsest Kidderminster. The Queen's were Brussels, but nothing extraordinary. In one large room was the king's throne—A gilded chair covered with crimson velvet, & his initials worked in gold upon it. The platform, & the steps by which you ascend to it, were also covered with crimson velvet. The window-curtains were superb—of crimson velvet & a gold vine wrought upon the edge of them. The Queen's apartments were more splendid than the king's. She had also a room similar to the king's, with a throne like
France (France) (search for this): chapter 9
eaving Stockholm—and shall probably take the steamboat to Gothenburg in about three weeks.—For my own part, I should like to go sooner if we could. I am disappointed in Sweden. The climate is too cold and unpleasant. I want a little warm sunshine. Something that I can feel, as well as see. From Gothenburg we shall go to Copenhagen, and after passing a month there, take steamboat to Stettin, and so to Berlin. We shall not return to the North again but pass the next summer in Germany and France. Much love to all. Very affectionately your Son H. W. Longfellow Mrs. Stephen Longfellow, care of Hon. Stephen Longfellow, Portland, Maine, U. S. of America. [to] Hon. Stephen Longfellow, Portland, Maine, U. S. Of America. Copenhagen, September 21, 1835. my dear Sir,—Henry has consented that I should copy a few pages of his journal for you; but I could not prevail on him to grant this, till I promised again & again for you, that you would not on any condition, allow it to go out o<
North Sea (search for this): chapter 9
of all I had seen. I only went to America to make a call & tell you all we had safely arrived, & was to return immediately. You will give very much love to all for me. They must all write me, & their letters shall be answered as speedily as possible. We leave here the last of this week. I shall leave letters to be sent by the first opportunity. George & Ann must not forget us. Your ever affectionate Mary. The Carlyles are again mentioned in a letter written while crossing the German Ocean. Steam ship, German Ocean, Thursday, June 11 [1835]. . . . We have some very pleasant passengers. A German lady with her father and little girl. What a strange idea foreigners have of America! This lady who appears very intelligent asked us if America was anything like London!! Then we have a German Prince with huge mustachios; Clara played whist with him last evening! Oh dear! I do not know as I shall be able to speak to you when I return, I see so many lords and ladies! but
Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
before us, & takes much the same route as we do, though a more extensive one. He will be in Stockholm in the course of the summer. Mr. Carlyle of Craigenputtock was soon after announced, & passed an half hour with us much to our delight. He has very unpolished manners, & broad Scottish accent, but such fine language & beautiful thoughts that it is truly delightful to listen to him. Perhaps you have read some of his articles in the Edinburgh Review. He invited us to take tea with him at Chelsea, where they now reside. We were as much charmed with Mrs. C [arlyle] as with her husband. She is a lovely woman with very simple & pleasing manners. She is also very talented & accomplished, & how delightful it is to see such modesty combined with such power to please. On Tuesday we visit Chantrey's study with them. This morning Mr. Bentham, a nephew of Jeremy's, called, & invited us to dine with them on Wednesday—We may see the great potentate appear. Henry is petitioning for room t
St. Albans, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
& drove to see the illuminations. It was after eleven & the crowd had nearly dispersed. There were brilliant crowns & a variety of pretty devices formed with coloured lamps & some very fine gas ones. I suspect however there was very little true rejoicing in all this show & splendour. The Queen is very unpopular among the people. Friday morn'g—Willis called. He had been to breakfast with the beautiful Mrs. Wadsworth, & was on his way, to breakfast at 3 in the aft. with the Duchess of St. Albans. Mrs. Wadsworth, from Genesseo, was a Philadelphia lady & has been greatly admired on the continent & here. She returns in a few days to America. Yesterday morning Mr. Barnard a young lawyer from Connecticut called upon me. He arrived but a month before us, & takes much the same route as we do, though a more extensive one. He will be in Stockholm in the course of the summer. Mr. Carlyle of Craigenputtock was soon after announced, & passed an half hour with us much to our delight. He
Copenhagen (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 9
s husband who is also a Baron. They went immediately to Copenhagen, we have not therefore seen her, but have heard much of an feel, as well as see. From Gothenburg we shall go to Copenhagen, and after passing a month there, take steamboat to Stet Stephen Longfellow, Portland, Maine, U. S. Of America. Copenhagen, September 21, 1835. my dear Sir,—Henry has consentedg extract from it will be found in the Life, i. 216. Copenhagen, September 22, 1835. My dear Aunt Lucia,—Pray do not ome Mr. Appleton had arrived from Stockholm. He goes to Copenhagen with us. Wednesday. 9. At two in the afta we left Gotmocks swung one above another.—Thursday. 10. Arrived in Copenhagen at 2 P. M. Found good accommodations at the Hotel Royal.& see, so I give you the best descriptions in my power. Copenhagen appears like a different place to us, from what it did wt as noisy. How different from our first impression of Copenhagen! but then we were direct from London & after that immen<
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