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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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untain, where he had committed the error of not concentrating the bulk of his forces. McClellan intended to conduct this operation in person with the brigades of Schleich and Rosecrans; these brigades were posted at Buckannon, a village where the road running from Beverly through the defile of Rich Mountain crosses that branch of the Monongahela which lower down waters the town of Philippi. This small army, numbering about 10,000 men, took up its line of march on the 6th of July, and on the 10th, after some insignificant encounters, McClellan, whose troops were ranged along the slopes of Rich Mountain, found himself before the works occupied by Pegram. Not wishing to attack them in front with inexperienced soldiers, he detached Rosecrans upon his right, on the morning of the 11th, to turn their flank and take them in rear. A path, only accessible to foot-soldiers, wound up the sides of Rich Mountain, south of the defile where the road from Beverly to Buckannon passes. Rosecrans
of Rich Mountain crosses that branch of the Monongahela which lower down waters the town of Philippi. This small army, numbering about 10,000 men, took up its line of march on the 6th of July, and on the 10th, after some insignificant encounters, McClellan, whose troops were ranged along the slopes of Rich Mountain, found himself before the works occupied by Pegram. Not wishing to attack them in front with inexperienced soldiers, he detached Rosecrans upon his right, on the morning of the 11th, to turn their flank and take them in rear. A path, only accessible to foot-soldiers, wound up the sides of Rich Mountain, south of the defile where the road from Beverly to Buckannon passes. Rosecrans, leaving his artillery behind him, was to follow this path—which the enemy would not probably dream of defending—with 2000 men, and, once on the summit of the ridge, was to proceed in a northerly direction to the defile in order to descend by the road and attack Pegram's positions in rear.
those we have already mentioned. On the 9th of July, McDowell was ordered to make preparations for assuming the offensive in eight days, and at the same time General Scott gave him formal assurance that Patterson should keep Johnston so occupied in the Shenandoah Valley that he would find it impossible to go to the assistance of Beauregard; that if he attempted to do so, the forces opposed to him would follow so close that they would reach the banks of Bull Run at the same time. On the 16th, the day fixed for the movement, there was nothing ready to transport the necessary provisions for the army. McDowell was nevertheless obliged to begin his march. He had four divisions with him—the fifth, Runyon's, remaining behind to protect the positions that the army was about to leave. Tyler's division, four brigades strong, was ordered to incline to the right by the Leesburg road, and encamp at Vienna, in order to fall back, by a cross-movement, on Fairfax Court-house the following da
of inexperience as the slowness and disorder of the march on the part of the soldiers, were to compromise the success of the campaign from the outset. Having found Centreville evacuated, Tyler thought, no doubt, that the whole expedition would amount to nothing more than a mere military promenade, and was anxious to secure for himself, in the eyes of the public, the cheap merit of having been the first to occupy the positions of Manassas. Having arrived at Centreville on the morning of the 18th, he proceeded with Richardson's brigade, a part of Sherman's, and a battery of artillery towards Blackburn's Ford, in the hope of being able to cross Bull Run with these forces. Beauregard was waiting for him there with a large portion of his army, and everything was ready for a vigorous defence of the line of that river against the Federal attacks. Seven brigades were in position: Ewell at Union Mills, Jones a little higher up, Longstreet at Blackburn's Ford, Bonham at Mitchell's Ford, C
ad 21,833 men and 29 pieces of artillery: thus, including a few troops which had been forwarded in haste from Richmond, and which were expected to arrive during the night, the army of the Shenandoah augmented his numbers to 30,000 men. McDowell, on the contrary, who had taken the field with 30,000 soldiers, had already seen their number reduced by the departure of one regiment and a battery of artillery, whose term of service had expired, and who shamefully left him at Centreville. On the 19th he found himself in the vicinity of this village with 28,000 men at the utmost; and although only ten leagues from Washington, he was in a strange country without maps or reliable guides to shape his course; before he could form his new plan of attack, he was obliged to spend two entire days in having the ground studied by his topographical officers. These two days, which were moreover required to complete the organization of his army, gave the enemy time to concentrate his forces. Finally
he vicinity of this village with 28,000 men at the utmost; and although only ten leagues from Washington, he was in a strange country without maps or reliable guides to shape his course; before he could form his new plan of attack, he was obliged to spend two entire days in having the ground studied by his topographical officers. These two days, which were moreover required to complete the organization of his army, gave the enemy time to concentrate his forces. Finally, the arrival, on the 20th, of the supply-trains so long expected allowed the issue of three days rations, and the Federal army got in readiness for the movement it was about to undertake. The right and centre of the Confederates being covered by formidable obstacles, McDowell determined to turn their extreme left, where Bull Run, fordable and badly guarded, no longer afforded them sufficient protection; and on the evening of the 20th he ordered an attack to be made the next morning. Miles remained at Centreville i
action of McDowell for the last two days seemed to justify this apprehension. The impression was that, having been informed of Johnston's movements, he had halted to wait in his turn for reinforcements from the upper Potomac, which would have restored to him the advantage in point of numbers. It was important to forestall him, and Beauregard determined to assume the offensive and proceed to attack him at Centreville. While McDowell was issuing orders for putting his troops in motion on the 21st, the Confederate army was preparing to cross Bull Run on the same day, and by an inverse movement to attack the extreme left of the Federals. This plan was perhaps a rash one, for if the latter had remained stationary, confining their operations to a defence of the positions they occupied, we may believe that the battle would have resulted to their advantage. McDowell, it is true, relying upon the assurances he had received, knew nothing of the arrival on the ground of Johnston's troops, an
April 15th (search for this): chapter 5
had before them, and determined to neglect nothing that could compass its success. Everybody set to work; patriotic donations flowed in; subscription funds were opened for the benefit of the soldiers; women manifested as much zeal to induce men to enlist as in the South; the largest iron mills in the United States were turned into cannon foundries or into outfitting establishments; finally, enlistments became more and more numerous. The three months volunteers raised on the first call of April 15th were discharged, but a great many of them re-enlisted. Those who had responded to the second call of May 4th, instead of the forty battalions asked for, already formed 208 battalions on the 21st of July. In order to complete the effective force of 250,000 men authorized by Congress, it was only necessary to encourage this movement and to receive into the service of the Union all the new battalions thus created. We have already described the manner in which they were recruited and organi
otic donations flowed in; subscription funds were opened for the benefit of the soldiers; women manifested as much zeal to induce men to enlist as in the South; the largest iron mills in the United States were turned into cannon foundries or into outfitting establishments; finally, enlistments became more and more numerous. The three months volunteers raised on the first call of April 15th were discharged, but a great many of them re-enlisted. Those who had responded to the second call of May 4th, instead of the forty battalions asked for, already formed 208 battalions on the 21st of July. In order to complete the effective force of 250,000 men authorized by Congress, it was only necessary to encourage this movement and to receive into the service of the Union all the new battalions thus created. We have already described the manner in which they were recruited and organized in each State. As soon as they were received into the Federal service by the mustering-officer, who had ch
cause of the North; the radical party, on the contrary, and all the working classes, manifested the liveliest sympathy for it. The attitude of the radicals and the workingmen prevented the English government from recognizing the independence of the new Confederacy, notwithstanding the solicitations of France, who, it is said, was even ready to propose to interfere conjointly with Great Britain in American affairs. But the latter power hastened to issue a proclamation of neutrality on the 13th of May, a few days before the arrival in London of the new representative of the United States, and as if to prevent any explanations which Mr. Adams might have wished to offer. The French government followed this example on the 11th of June. America, therefore, who had a right to rely upon the sympathies of abolitionist England in her struggle with slavery, and upon those of the land of Rochambeau and La Fayette, in her efforts to preserve the work of Washington, only found in the governments
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