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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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Eltham (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s of which we have just spoken caused fresh delays on the evening of the 5th of May; and leaving the rest of the troops behind, this division started alone during the night. It reached the mouth of the Pamunky River on the 6th, at a place called Eltham, not far from the little village of Bartramsville. Newton's brigade, together with some artillery, was landed before sunset on the right bank of the river, and the process of disembarkation was suspended until the following day. On the morninare when large masses of men have to be moved. Three days after the battle of Williamsburg the first columns of the Federal infantry left that town, and on the 10th of May the whole army was receiving its supplies from the depot established near Eltham. A new phase of the campaign was about to begin. Notwithstanding many miscalculations and delays, General Mc-Clellan had succeeded in removing the seat of war from the vicinity of Washington to that of Richmond. He had left the peninsula for a
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
line from the sources of the Shenandoah, a little below Staunton, to the confluence of this river and the Potomac at Harper's Ferry. Its breadth, between the two chains of hills which enclose it, is everywhere from forty to fifty kilometres. Termiter, Martinsburg and Charlestown. There are but two small lines of railroad to be found in the valley. One connects Harper's Ferry with Winchester; the other is the one used by Johnston on the 21st of July, 1861, to take his troops to the battle-fifollowed Banks as far as Williamsport, where the latter had hastened to cross the Potomac. He at once turned against Harper's Ferry, and on the 28th appeared in front of that position. He could have had no serious intention of occupying it; for in undertaking a retrograde movement, which was becoming unavoidable; for on the 29th, while he was preparing to attack Harper's Ferry, he learned that the Federal armies were at last moving from every direction to cut off his retreat, and he set about
Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ound in the valley. One connects Harper's Ferry with Winchester; the other is the one used by Johnston on the 21st of July, 1861, to take his troops to the battle-field of Bull Run. By following this unfinished track from east to west, starting from Manassas Junction, we find that it crosses the Blue Ridge at Manassas Gap, above Front Royal, descends into the valley, crosses the Shenandoah road, and, ascending the North Fork through Strasburg as far as Woodstock, terminates abruptly at Mount Jackson. It was to have been continued as far as Staunton. This description will enable the reader to understand the importance of the villages of Strasburg and Front Royal, which close up the two outlets of the valley, communicating with Winchester on one side and with Washington on the other, by way of Manassas Gap and the railway. But these were not positions the defence of which could be entrusted to a small force; for Strasburg was approachable on every side, and Front Royal was at too
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
n the salt tide-waters which ascend York River as far as West Point, and the James beyond City Point. This flat country, whminy, then the Pamunky at White House, and terminates at West Point, where the latter river and the Mattapony both empty inty might have attempted to stop them between Yorktown and West Point. The army of the Potomac could not allow Johnston to es was a simple impossibility; the head would have reached West Point before the rear had left Yorktown; it became necessary tA large quantity of the materiel had been transported to West Point by water, whence it could be forwarded to Richmond by rathem back to the transports which were to convey them to West Point. He was not, however, without some uneasiness regardingult of navigation, and a small railway line leading from West Point to Richmond crosses from the left to the right side of tquarters were at Tunstall's station, on the railway from West Point and Richmond. The whole army was placed en echelon with
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
om Richmond debouched perpendicularly into the Quaker road, like so many radii connecting the are ofnto the Charles City road, to connect with the Quaker road in the Glendale clearings. Several smallal road directly with Haxall's Landing and the Quaker road. Their numerous zigzags turned them intoally discovered a road running parallel to the Quaker road, which had been abandoned for a number ofovery; for this road, lying to the left of the Quaker road for troops marching toward the James, offy a dense forest, extended to the right of the Quaker road, so that the roads coming from the Centraxtended gradually across an open country. The Quaker road, after joining a crossroad coming from tho roads—that from Richmond to Haxall's and the Quaker road, which, fortunately for the Federals, ledn order to continue to follow the enemy by the Quaker road, while Magruder and Huger were to file toe day. Before crossing the Western Run at the Quaker road ford, and appearing in front of the first[8 more...]
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
important defile in the Blue Ridge called Thornton's Gap, by way of Luray. The principal road follows the larger valley of North Fork from Harrisonburg to Strasburg, through Woodstock, and thence down to Winchester direct. Below Strasburg and Front Royal the undulations in the ground disappear almost entirely, and the Shenandoah, hugging the base of the Blue Ridge, leaves to its left the magnificent plain watered by the small stream of the Opequan, in which lie the towns of Winchester, Martinsburg and Charlestown. There are but two small lines of railroad to be found in the valley. One connects Harper's Ferry with Winchester; the other is the one used by Johnston on the 21st of July, 1861, to take his troops to the battle-field of Bull Run. By following this unfinished track from east to west, starting from Manassas Junction, we find that it crosses the Blue Ridge at Manassas Gap, above Front Royal, descends into the valley, crosses the Shenandoah road, and, ascending the North
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
of the other branch, called North Fork, at Front Royal. This last stream waters the western slope to Winchester direct. Below Strasburg and Front Royal the undulations in the ground disappear almimportance of the villages of Strasburg and Front Royal, which close up the two outlets of the vallrasburg was approachable on every side, and Front Royal was at too great distance from the encampme, the First Maryland, had been stationed at Front Royal for some time for the purpose of holding thd, on the 22d, only sixteen kilometres from Front Royal. On the 23d the small Federal garrison, coeast to west, to join hands with Fremont at Front Royal, and thus cut off Jackson's retreat. In vafinally to march himself with a third, upon Front Royal. He obeyed with great reluctance; for notwl of Fremont at Strasburg and of Shields at Front Royal. If their calculations had been correct, Jwas uniting two of his reduced divisions at Front Royal, Fremont, encamped on the neighboring heigh[7 more...]
Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ption of the clearings of Frazier's Farm and Glendale, and the cultivated slopes of Malvern Hill, t Keyes with his two divisions had encamped at Glendale, in the neighborhood of Nelson's Farm. The tidge, leading directly from Savage station to Glendale—a precious discovery, although this road was sition previously occupied by Keyes' corps at Glendale. The latter had started for Turkey Bend, on occupied by Porter a few hours before, beyond Glendale. McCall had left Frazier's Farm, and his tro the intersection of these different roads at Glendale may be represented by a square, the four anglhite Oak Swamp on the Richmond side. Between Glendale and Malvern Hill small swamps, forming the sobattles of Savage station, Frazier's Farm and Glendale were huddled. There was scarcely a sufficienquagmire, four or five guns lost by McCall at Glendale, and as many dismounted pieces which Franklin no intention of defending Frazier's Farm and Glendale, and was waiting for the reports of the gener[17 more...]
Old Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
bor, we come to New Bridge, which connects the hamlet of Old Tavern with the Gaines' Mill heights. One kilometre below this terward into a large clearing, in the midst of which, at Old Tavern, it again connects with the Richmond road to New Bridge o sustain his attack. Smith's orders were to proceed to Old Tavern, in order to cover the left wing of the army in case thek Swamp; Smith, on their left, continued inactive around Old Tavern. In short, the two generals-in-chief were both unconsc, inasmuch as he was the assailant. Leisurely posted at Old Tavern, he was still waiting for the booming of cannon on the Wm the Williamsburg road, and a man on horseback, leaving Old Tavern, would have had no more than ten kilometres to ride, witner placed one brigade and a half on the right, fronting Old Tavern; on the left the remainder of Sedgwick's division was di make himself master of the approaches to the plateau of Old Tavern, McClellan, still manoeuvring as if conducting the opera
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1
last to encounter the élite of the slavery troops. It was, in fact, in the peninsula where the soldiers of Washington and Rochambeau completed the glorious work of American emancipation. It was around Yorktown, already made celebrated by the capitulation of Lord Cornwallis, that the army of the Potomac was about to fight its first battles; and if it may be permitted to an obscure member of that army to indulge here in a personal reflection, it was the remembrance of the victory achieved by France and America conjointly upon this very soil which caused a throb in the heart of the exiles so generously received under the shadow of the flag of the young republic. Notwithstanding the historical associations which cluster around it, this locality was but little known; and in view of its peculiar configuration, we deem a detailed description necessary to a proper understanding of the operations we are about to relate. Fortress Monroe, situated at the extremity of the peninsula, lies one
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