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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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e could easily support the troops stationed on the opposite side, Stone River not being very deep at this point. This movement was the more menacing to Bragg's right flank and his communications with Murfreesborough, because the conversion of his whole army had drawn away the left from his base of operations; it showed, above all, that, so far from thinking of retreat, Rosecrans was preparing to resume the offensive. The Confederate commander only made this discovery on the morning of the 2d, for his cavalry, worn out by its exertions on the 31st of December, had needed the whole of the 1st to recuperate; and being, besides, under the impression that an offensive return was impossible, he had not deemed it necessary to feel the enemy except along the Nashville road. He at once determined to forestall the Federals, and to attack them so vigorously in that direction as to compel them to acknowledge themselves beaten. The hills occupied by Beatty enabled the Union artillery, once p
wounded. During the evening, part of McCook's corps, having recovered from the effects of its disaster of the 31st, came to take position on the reconquered heights; but the rain had softened the soil to such a degree that, on the morning of the 3d, Rosecrans deemed it impracticable to put his troops again on the march in order to complete the movement he had been contemplating for the last three days. He soon perceived, moreover, that this manoeuvre would be productive of no results; his pere sanguinary struggle we have just been describing. The greater the efforts of the Confederates, and the nearer they had been to achieving success, the more keenly this unlooked — for denouement was felt by them. In the course of the day, on the 3d, their columns again took up their line of march for Murfreesborough sadly, but in good order and without discouragement; they carried with them the glorious but barren trophies of their victory of the 31st, consisting of twenty-eight guns, some st
is of an exceptional fertility. Farther south the undulating ground ends in a series of abrupt slopes, which border the left bank of the Yazoo, and sink at last in the waters of the Mississippi on the shores of Vicksburg. On the 2d of November, Grant had put five divisions in motion, which swelled the number of his active forces to more than thirty thousand men. Three of these divisions started from Bolivar, the other two came from Corinth, and all proceeded toward Grand Junction. On the 4th the Federal army occupied this point, as well as Lagrange, while the cavalry was advancing toward the south. But the reinforcements, which had long been expected, arrived slowly, and the political influences, which had embarrassed military operations in Virginia, were beginning to be felt in the remote regions where the modest and reticent Grant was in command. His position was envied by many persons, who, in order to prove their capacity, were busying themselves in Washington in projecting
communications with the base of operations perfectly secured. Despairing to overtake Pemberton to inflict upon him a decisive defeat, Grant then fell back upon the plan of attacking Vicksburg by the river, and on the 5th of December he made a proposition to that effect to Halleck, the more earnestly, perhaps, because he dreaded to see this expedition entrusted to McClernand, while he himself would be left powerless between the Tallahatchie and the Yallabusha. His plan was approved on the 8th. Sherman, who had already succeeded in inspiring confidence in two chiefs so entirely opposite in character as Halleck and Grant, was designated to command the expedition. Returning to Memphis with the two divisions he had brought over, he was to embark them at that point, together with all the troops recently arrived from the North, join Steele's division at Helena and Delta, and, having thus assembled about forty thousand men, descend the river as far as in front of Vicksburg under the es
had already so many times paralyzed its operations. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad, destroyed during the fall, was at last, after much labor, about to be put again in running order along the whole line. The completion of this line would render Rosecrans once more free in his movements; but it was above all necessary to protect him against new devastations. The skirmishing warfare, which had been interrupted for a short time, was resumed during the latter part of November. On the 10th a detachment of Federal infantry repelled at Rural Hill, east of Nashville, the attack of a body of guerillas which had tried to capture a convoy destined for the left wing of the army. A few days later, Morgan, having sent part of his cavalry on a reconnaissance along the right bank of the Cumberland, was attacked by Colonel Kennett, who captured all the booty which the Confederates had collected, and drove them to the other side of the river. On the 27th, this same Colonel Kennett, crossi
same period, the pickets of both armies were continuing to feel each other south-east of Nashville, and the Federals, in proportion as they felt stronger, pushed reconnaissances in the direction they intended to follow, as soon as their preparations were completed. On the 27th of November, Sill's division thus advanced as far as Lavergne, where it encountered some partisans, with whom it exchanged a few shots. Another engagement took place at the same point on the 9th of December. On the 12th, General Stanley, with some regiments of cavalry, surprised the Confederate pickets at Franklin, took possession of this village, and destroyed all the depots and mills which served to supply Bragg's army. It was evident, however, to the Confederates that Rosecrans was about to undertake operations on a much larger scale. It was important to be prepared either to forestall him by assuming the offensive in advance of him, or, after waiting for him, to take advantage of a first success to h
vided into two separate commands; the two divisions from Corinth were under Hamilton, the other three divisions had been brought over from Boliver by McPherson. The latter had occupied Lamar with ten thousand men since the 8th of November; on the 13th, his vanguard was at Holly Springs, the first important station after Grand Junction. The Federal cavalry, both numerous and active, extended far and wide, and reached the banks of the Tallahatchie, toward which Grant was leading all his forces. d taken the Virginia into battle for the first time. The infantry was taken on board; the artillery and cavalry, having been left on the other side of the Atchafalaya, ascended the left side of the Teche between this river and the lake. On the 13th the flotilla appeared before Pattersonville. The obstacle which the Confederates had raised in this place was insurmountable. It consisted of a boat sunk crossways, resting upon the scaffolding of an old bridge; the guns placed on the enemy's w
tter made no secret of their sympathies with the enemy. Hence arose that negligence and carelessness of which Murphy was the first to set the example. A large hospital had been established for the numerous sick who suffered from dysentery, typhoid or malarial fevers. Murphy had not turned up a single spadeful of earth to protect the valuables entrusted to his care, and not a solitary officer had been sent from headquarters to watch him. He received Grant's despatch on the evening of the 19th, but this failed to rouse him from his lethargy; he made no preparations for defence, no attempt to barricade the streets with the bales of cotton which filled the warehouses, and did not even put his soldiers under arms. Consequently, on the morning of the 20th, when Van Dorn's cavalry came up at a gallop into the streets of Holly Springs, they only found a few sentinels at the entrance of the village; all the passes were open and the village plunged in profound sleep; they were already mas
t to barricade the streets with the bales of cotton which filled the warehouses, and did not even put his soldiers under arms. Consequently, on the morning of the 20th, when Van Dorn's cavalry came up at a gallop into the streets of Holly Springs, they only found a few sentinels at the entrance of the village; all the passes were the enemy, anxious to get away, would he compelled to set most of them at liberty unconditionally. In fact, Van Dorn had resumed his march on the evening of the 20th, and was moving rapidly toward the north, where he hoped to continue his devastations. A few hours after his departure, the reinforcement sent by Grant, which hadnts; these forces were disposed in three divisions under command of Generals A. J. Smith, M. L. Smith and Morgan. When Sherman gave the order for embarking on the 20th, the preparations for so complicated an operation were not entirely completed. All the steamers that could be found had been collected together on the Mississippi
idea that the enemy, anxious to get away, would he compelled to set most of them at liberty unconditionally. In fact, Van Dorn had resumed his march on the evening of the 20th, and was moving rapidly toward the north, where he hoped to continue his devastations. A few hours after his departure, the reinforcement sent by Grant, which had been detained on the road by an accident, arrived at Holly Springs. This was the only important success obtained by Van Dorn. On the following day, the 21st, he made an attack on the post of Davis' Mill which was only defended by two hundred and fifty men. Hoping to overcome so small a band, he tried several times to carry it by assault at the head of his dismounted troopers; but being repeatedly repulsed, he was obliged to give up the attempt, leaving a considerable number of wounded upon the ground. Being always in search of some new weak point, he presented himself successively before Cold Water Bridge, Middleburg and Bolivar, but found every
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