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Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 5
rs the glory of having discovered the western hemisphere. It is 1000 or 1003 said, that they passed from their own island to Green land, and were driven by adverse winds from Greenland to the shores of Labrador; that the voyage was often repeated; that the coasts of America were extensively explored, and colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries believe that Northmen entered the waters of Rhode Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our country as far as Carolina. But the story of the colonization of America by North-men, rests on narratives, mythological in form, and obscure in meaning; ancient, yet not contemporary. The chief document is an interpolation in the history of Chap. I.} Sturleson, whos
Castile, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ming as it were from Heaven the Indies as his own, and dividing them as he pleased. The increase of years did not impair his holy confidence; and in 1492, when he seemed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he gave a New World to Castile and Leon, the like of which was never done by any man in ancient or in later times. The self-love of Ferdinand of Spain was offended at owing to a foreigner benefits too vast for requital; and the contemporaries of the great mariner persecutee most intense public curiosity, he was reverenced for his achievements, his knowledge of cosmography, and his skill in navigation. On the death of Henry the Seventh he was called out of England by the command of Ferdinand, the Catholic king of Castile, and was appointed one of the Council for the New Indies, ever cherishing the hope to discover that hidden secret of nature, the direct passage to Asia. In 1518 he was named Pilot Major of Spain, and no 1518 one could guide a ship to the Indie
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ttracted to Lisbon, as the great centre of maritime adventure. He came to insist with immovable resoluteness that the shortest route to the Indies lay across the Atlantic. By letters from the venerable Toscanelli, the illustrious astronomer of Florence, who had drawn a map of the world with eastern Asia rising over against Europe, he was riveted in his faith, and longed for the opportunity of proving its reality. After more than ten years of vain solicitations in Portugal, he left the bankss overtaken by as terrible a tempest, as mariners ever encountered; and fifty days elapsed before the continent appeared in view. At length, in the latitude of Wilmington S. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 23. In the Libreria Strozziana in Florence, there is a copious manuscript account of Verrazzani's voyage and discoveries. Tiraboschi, VII. 261, 262. Verrazzani could congratulate himself on beholding land Mar which had never been seen by any European. But no convenient harbor was foun
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
lowed. under the auspices of De Guercheville and Mary of 1613 Medici; the rude intrenchments of St. Sauveur were Chap. I.} 1613. raised by De Saussaye on the eastern shore of Mount 1613. Desert Isle. The conversion of the heathen was the motive to the settlement; the natives venerated Biart as a messenger from heaven; and under the summer sky, round a cross in the centre of the hamlet, matins and vespers were regularly chanted. France and the Roman religion had appropriated the soil of Maine. Meantime the remonstrances of French merchants had effected the revocation of the monopoly of De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adv
Huguenot (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s already selected as the appropriate site for a fort. Champlain returned to France just before an exclusive 1603 Nov 8. patent had been issued to a Calvinist, the able, patriotic, and honest De Monts. The sovereignty of Acadia and its confines, from the fortieth to the forty-sixth degree of latitude, that is, from Philadelphia to beyond Chap. I.} 1603. Montreal; a still wider monopoly of the fur-trade; the exclusive control of the soil, government, and trade; freedom of religion for Huguenot emigrants,—these were the privileges which the charter conceded. Idlers, and men without a profession, and all banished men, were doomed to lend him aid. A lucrative monopoly was added to the honors of territorial jurisdiction. Wealth and glory were alike expected. An expedition was prepared without delay, and left 1604. Mar. 7. the shores of France, not to return till a permanent French settlement should be made in America. All New France was now contained in two ships, which follow
Dieppe (France) (search for this): chapter 5
arting from a fleet which had cruised successfully along the shores of Spain, sailed for Amer- 1524 Jan. 17. ica, See Verrazzani's letter to Francis I., from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, in Hakluyt, III. 357—364, or in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 45—60. It is also in Ramusio. Compare Charlevoix, N. F. i. 5—8. with a single caravel, resoof Chauvin prevented his settling a colony. A firmer hope of success was entertained, when a 1603. company of merchants of Rouen was formed by the governor of Dieppe; and Samuel Champlain, of Brouage, an able marine officer and a man of science, was appointed to direct the expedition. By his natural disposition, delighting mariated the soil of Maine. Meantime the remonstrances of French merchants had effected the revocation of the monopoly of De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding <
Brittany (France) (search for this): chapter 5
commerce and the soil of America. Within seven years of the discovery of the continent, 1504 the fisheries of Newfoundland were known to the hardy mariners of Brittany and Normandy. Charlevoix, Hist. Gen. de la Nouv. Fr. i. 3, edition of 1744, 4 to.; Champlain's Voyages, i. 9. Navarette, &c. III. 176—180, argues against th The purpose of founding a French empire in America was renewed, and an ample commission 1596. was issued to the Marquis'de la Roche, a nobleman of Chap. I.} Brittany. Yet his enterprise entirely failed. Sweeping the prisons of France, he established their tenants on the desolate Isle of Sable; and the wretched exiles sighedlain successfully established the authority of the French on the banks of the St. Lawrence, in the territory which became his country. The father of New France lies buried in the land which he colonized. Thus the humble industry of the fishermen of 1635 Normandy and Brittany promised their country the acquisition of an empire
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
d to the shores of Labrador; that the voyage was often repeated; that the coasts of America were extensively explored, and colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries be i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degrees. The natives of the more northern region were hostile and jealous; it was impossible to conciliate their confot to return till a permanent French settlement should be made in America. All New France was now contained in two ships, which followed the well-known path to Nova Scotia. The summer glided away, while the emigrants trafficked with the natives and explored the coasts. The harbor called Annapolis after the conquest of Acadia by
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our country as far as Carolina. But the story of the colonization of America by North-men. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degrees. The natives of the more northern region were hostilw of a settlement at the south, De Monts explored and claimed for France the rivers, the 1605. coasts and the bays of New England, as far, at least, as Cape Cod. The numbers and hostility of the savages led him to delay a removal, since his colon future; and in a few years the castle St. Louis, so long the place 1624. of council against the Iroquois and against New England, was durably founded on a commanding cliff. In the same year, the viceroyalty was transferred to 1624. the religio
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Roberval accomplished no more than a verification of previous discoveries. Remaining about a year in America, he abandoned his immense viceroy- Chap. I.} 1542. alty. Estates in Picardy were better than titles in Norimbega. His subjects must have been a sad company; during the winter, one was hanged for theft; several were put in irons; and divers persons, as well women as men, were whipped. By these means quiet was preserved. Perhaps the expedition on its return entered the Bay of Massachusetts; the French diplomatists always remembered, that Boston was built within the original limits of New France. The commission of Roberval was followed by no per- 1549. manent results. It is confidently said, that, at a later date, he again embarked for his viceroyalty, accompanied by a numerous train of adventurers; and, as he was never more heard of, he may have perished at sea. Can it be a matter of surprise, that, for the next fifty 1550 to 1600. years, no further discoveries we
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