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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Ponce Leon (search for this): chapter 5
ded charity of food and shelter for himself and his little son whom he led by the hand, the destitute and forsaken seaman, in his naked poverty, was still the promiser of kingdoms; holding firmly in his grasp the keys of the ocean sea, claiming as it were from Heaven the Indies as his own, and dividing them as he pleased. The increase of years did not impair his holy confidence; and in 1492, when he seemed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he gave a New World to Castile and Leon, the like of which was never done by any man in ancient or in later times. The self-love of Ferdinand of Spain was offended at owing to a foreigner benefits too vast for requital; and the contemporaries of the great mariner persecuted the merit which they could not adequately reward. Nor had posterity been mindful to gather into a finished picture the memorials of his career, till the genius of Irving, with candor, liberality, and original research, made a record of his life, and in mild
Lancaster (search for this): chapter 5
iddle ages, concentrated upon the Mediterranean Sea, had enriched the Italian republics, and had been chiefly engrossed by their citizens. Maritime enterprise now transferred its seat to the borders of the Atlantic, and became boundless in its range. It set before itself as its great problem the discovery of a pathway by sea to the Indies; and England, which like Spain and Portugal looked out upon the ocean, became a competitor for the unknown world. The wars of the houses of York and Lancaster 1496. had terminated with the intermarriage of the heirs of the two families; the spirit of commercial activity began to be successfully fostered; and the marts of England were frequented by Lombard adventurers. The fisheries of the north had long tempted the merchants of Bristol to an intercourse with Iceland; and had matured the nautical skill that could buffet the worst storms of the Atlantic. Nor is it impossible, that some uncertain traditions respecting the remote discoveries whic
T. Irving (search for this): chapter 5
ed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he gave a New World to Castile and Leon, the like of which was never done by any man in ancient or in later times. The self-love of Ferdinand of Spain was offended at owing to a foreigner benefits too vast for requital; and the contemporaries of the great mariner persecuted the merit which they could not adequately reward. Nor had posterity been mindful to gather into a finished picture the memorials of his career, till the genius of Irving, with candor, liberality, and original research, made a record of his life, and in mild but enduring colors sketched his sublime inflexibility of purpose, the solemn trances of his mystic devotion, and the unfailing greatness of his soul. Successive popes of Rome had already conceded to the Portuguese the undiscovered world, from Cape Chap. I.} Bojador in Africa, easterly to the Indies. To prevent collision between Christian princes, on the fourth of May, 1493, Alexander the Sixth publ
or called Annapolis after the conquest of Acadia by Queen Anne, an excellent harbor, though difficult of access possessing a small but navigable river, which abounded in fish, and is bordered by beautiful meadows, so pleased the imagination of Poutrincourt, a leader in the enterprise, that he sued for a grant of it from De Monts, and, naming it Port Royal, determined to reside there with his family. The company of De Monts made their first attempt at a settlement on the island of St. 1604. Croix, at the mouth of the river of the same name The remains of their fortifications were still visible, 1798. when our eastern boundary was ascertained. Yet the island was so ill suited to their purposes, that, in the following spring, they removed to Port Royal. 1605 For an agricultural colony, a milder climate was more desirable; in view of a settlement at the south, De Monts explored and claimed for France the rivers, the 1605. coasts and the bays of New England, as far, at least, as Ca
N. Y. Hist (search for this): chapter 5
sheries of Newfoundland were known to the hardy mariners of Brittany and Normandy. Charlevoix, Hist. Gen. de la Nouv. Fr. i. 3, edition of 1744, 4 to.; Champlain's Voyages, i. 9. Navarette, &c. IVerrazzani's letter to Francis I., from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, in Hakluyt, III. 357—364, or in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 45—60. It is also in Ramusio. Compare Charlevoix, N. F. i. 5—8. with a single carore the continent appeared in view. At length, in the latitude of Wilmington S. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 23. In the Libreria Strozziana in Florence, there is a copious manuscript account e covetous could discern mineral wealth in the hills of New Jersey. Hakluyt, III. 360, 361. N. Y. Hist Coll. i. 52, 53. Moulton's New York, i. 138, 139. In the spacious haven of Newport, Verrto covet their possession. Hakluyt, III. 361. Moulton's New York, i. 147, 148. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persev<
Charles Bourbon (search for this): chapter 5
d a mixed party of Hurons from Montreal, and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New York. He ascended the Sorel, and explored the lake which bears his name, and perpetuates his memory. The Huguenots had been active in plans of coloniza- 1610. tion. The death of Henry IV. deprived them of their powerful protector. Yet the zeal of De Monts survived, and he quickened the courage of Champlain. After the short supremacy of Charles de Bourbon, the Prince of 1611, 1612. Conde, an avowed protector of the Calvinists, became viceroy of New France; through his intercession, mer- 1615. chants of St. Malo, Rouen, and La Rochelle, obtained a colonial patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New World, accompanied by monks of the order of St. Francis. Again he invades the territory of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. s
s own narrative of the voyage is the earliest original account, now extant, of the coast of the United States. He advanced the knowledge of the country; and he gave to France some claim to an extensive territory, on the pretext of discovery. Chalmers's Annals, 512. Harris's Voyages, II. 348,349. The historians of maritime adventure agree, that 1525 Verrazzani again embarked upon an expedition, from which, it is usually added, he never returned. Did he Chap. I.} 1525 Feb. 24. sail onr mistake, i. 178. from St. Mar 23. Malo the next spring after the date of his commission; he arrived at the scene of his former adventures, ascended the St. Lawrence, and, near the site of Quebec, built a fort for the security of his party; Chalmers, 82, places this event in 1545, without reason. but no considerable advances in geographical knowledge appear to have been made. The winter passed in sullenness and gloom. In June of the following year, he and his 1542 ships stole away and re
Vasco Gama (search for this): chapter 5
re than twenty-one years of age, chiefly at his own cost, led forth two ships and a large company of English volunteers, to find the north-west passage to Cathay and Japan. A few days after the English navigator had left the port of Bristol, Vasco de Gama, of Portugal, as daring and almost as young, having turned the Cape of Good Hope, cleared the Straits of Mozambique, and sailed beyond Arabia Felix, came in sight of the mountains of Hindostan; and his happy crew, decking out his little fleett great voyage which was undertaken by the authority of the most wise prince Henry the Seventh, and made known to England a country much larger than Christendom. Thus the year 1498 stands singularly famous in the annals of the sea. In May, Vasco de Gama reached Hindostan by way of the Cape of Good Hope; in Chap. I.} 1498. August, Columbus discovered the firm land of South 1498. America, and the river Oronoco, which seemed to him to flow from some large empire, or perhaps even from the ter
assador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most northern point Herrera, d. i. l. VI. c. XVI. Gomara, c. XXXVII. Also in Eden, fol 227. Galvano, in Hakluyt, IV. 419. Purchas, i. 95, 916. Memoir of Cabot, b. II. c. III. and IV. which he attained, was probably about the fiftieth degree. Of the country along which he sailed, he had occasion to admire the brilliant freshness of the verdure, and the density of the stately forests The pines, well adapted for masts and yards, promised to become an object of gainful commerce. But men were already with the Por
and a noble man of Picardy, Francis de la Roque, lord of Roberval, a man of considerable provincial distinction, sought and 1540. Jan. 15. inces and plant colonies upon parchment; Roberval could congratulate himself on being the acknowledged lorditself defeated the enterprise. Hakluyt, III. 286—297. Roberval was ambitious of power; and Cartier desired the exclusive for one whole year; and, further, it is undisputed, that Roberval did not sail till April, 1542; and it is expressly said in the account of Roberval's voyage, Hak. III. 295, that Jaques Cartier and his company were sent with five sayles the yeere is 1542 ships stole away and returned to France, just as Roberval arrived with a considerable reinforcement. Unsustained by Cartier, Roberval accomplished no more than a verification of previous discoveries. Remaining about a year in America, hn the original limits of New France. The commission of Roberval was followed by no per- 1549. manent results. It is con
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