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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Lake Nipissing (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
al patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New World, accompanied by monks of the order of St. Francis. Again he invades the territory of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. spends the first winter after his return to America in the country of the Hurons; and a knight errant among the forests carries his language, religion, and influence, even to the hamlets of Algonquins, near Lake Nipissing. Religious disputes combined with commercial jeal- 1617 to 1620 July ousies to check the progress of the colony; yet in the summer, when the Pilgrims were leaving Leyden, in obedience to the wishes of the unhappy Montmorenci, the new viceroy, Champlain, began a fort. The merchants grudged the expense. It is not best to yield to the passions of men, was his reply; they sway but for a season; it is a duty to respect the future; and in a few years the castle St. Louis, so long the pla
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
ith unsuspecting hospitality. Leaving his ships safely moored, Cartier, in a boat, sailed up the majestic stream to the chief Indian settlement on the island of Hochelaga. The language of its inhabitants proves them to have been of the Huron family of tribes. Charlevoix, i. 12. Cass, in N. Rev. XXIV. 421. The town lay at the nts. The sovereignty of Acadia and its confines, from the fortieth to the forty-sixth degree of latitude, that is, from Philadelphia to beyond Chap. I.} 1603. Montreal; a still wider monopoly of the fur-trade; the exclusive control of the soil, government, and trade; freedom of religion for Huguenot emigrants,—these were the preared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adventurer, attended but by two Europeans, joined a mixed party of Hurons from Montreal, and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New York. He ascended the Sorel, and explored the lake whic
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 5
rt of the fifteenth century the navigators of Portugal had confined their explorations to the coast more than ten years of vain solicitations in Portugal, he left the banks of the Tagus, to seek the while all to the east of it was confirmed to Portugal. The commerce of the middle ages, concentrthe Indies; and England, which like Spain and Portugal looked out upon the ocean, became a competitod left the port of Bristol, Vasco de Gama, of Portugal, as daring and almost as young, having turned; De Gama is the hero of the national epic of Portugal; but the elder Cabot was so little celebratedenry VII. recognised the claims of Spain and Portugal, only so far as they actually occupied the te4. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readilrom Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in
and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New York. He ascended the Sorel, and explored the lake which bears his name, and perpetuates his memory. The Huguenots had been active in plans of coloniza- 1610. tion. The death of Henry IV. deprived them of their powerful protector. Yet the zeal of De Monts survived, and he quickened the courage of Champlain. After the short supremacy of Charles de Bourbon, the Prince of 1611, 1612. Conde, an avowed protector of the Calvinists, became viceroy of New France; through his intercession, mer- 1615. chants of St. Malo, Rouen, and La Rochelle, obtained a colonial patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New World, accompanied by monks of the order of St. Francis. Again he invades the territory of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. spends the first winter after his return
North 1518 America had been suggested by De Lery and Saint Just; L'Escarbot, 21. Memoire, &c. 104. when at length Francis I., a monarch who had invited Da Vinci and Cellini to transplant the fine arts into his kingdom, employed John Verrazzani, another Florentine, to explore the new regions, which had alike excited curi- 1523 osity and hope. It was by way of the isle of Madeira, that the Italian, parting from a fleet which had cruised successfully along the shores of Spain, sailed for Amer- 1524 Jan. 17. ica, See Verrazzani's letter to Francis I., from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, in Hakluyt, III. 357—364, or in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 45—60. It is also in Ramusio. Compare Charlevoix, N. F. i. 5—8. with a single caravel, resolute to make discovery of new countries. The Dolphin, though it had the Chap. I.} 1524 good hap of a fortunate name, was overtaken by as terrible a tempest, as mariners ever encountered; and fifty days elapsed before the continent appeared in view. At len<
Divers Voyages (search for this): chapter 5
trous battle of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have sent forth another expedition? Did he relinquish the service of France for that of England? It is hardly a safe conjecture, 1527 that he was murdered in an encounter with savages, while on a voyage of discovery, which Henry VIII. had favored. Memoir of S. Cabot, 271—276. Hakluyt asserts, that Verrazzani was thrice on the coast of America, and that he gave a map of it to the English monarch. Hakl. Divers Voyages, 1582, quoted in Mem. of Cabot, p. 272. It is the common tradition, that he perished at sea, having been engaged in an expedition of which no tidings were ever heard. Such a report might easily be spread respecting a great navigator who had disappeared from the public view; and the rumor might be adopted by an incautious historian. It is probable, that Verrazzani had only retired from the fatigues of the life of a mariner; and, while others believed him buried in the ocean, he may have
rce of the middle ages, concentrated upon the Mediterranean Sea, had enriched the Italian republics, and had been chiefly engrossed by their citizens. Maritime enterprise now transferred its seat to the borders of the Atlantic, and became boundless in its range. It set before itself as its great problem the discovery of a pathway by sea to the Indies; and England, which like Spain and Portugal looked out upon the ocean, became a competitor for the unknown world. The wars of the houses of York and Lancaster 1496. had terminated with the intermarriage of the heirs of the two families; the spirit of commercial activity began to be successfully fostered; and the marts of England were frequented by Lombard adventurers. The fisheries of the north had long tempted the merchants of Bristol to an intercourse with Iceland; and had matured the nautical skill that could buffet the worst storms of the Atlantic. Nor is it impossible, that some uncertain traditions respecting the remote disco
La Rabida (search for this): chapter 5
the stars at sea from the Chap. I.} latitude of Iceland to near the equator at Elmina. Though yet longer baffled by the scepticism which knew not how to share his aspirations, he lost nothing of the grandeur of his conceptions, or the proud magnanimity of his character, or devotion to the sublime enterprise to which he held himself elected from his infancy by the promises of God; and when half resolved to withdraw from Spain, travelling on foot, he knocked at the gate of the monastery of La Rabida, at Palos, to crave the needed charity of food and shelter for himself and his little son whom he led by the hand, the destitute and forsaken seaman, in his naked poverty, was still the promiser of kingdoms; holding firmly in his grasp the keys of the ocean sea, claiming as it were from Heaven the Indies as his own, and dividing them as he pleased. The increase of years did not impair his holy confidence; and in 1492, when he seemed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he g
Samuel Champlain (search for this): chapter 5
ts of Rouen was formed by the governor of Dieppe; and Samuel Champlain, of Brouage, an able marine officer and a man of scieisposition, delighting marvellously in these enterprises, Champlain became the father of the French settlements in Canada. Hs already selected as the appropriate site for a fort. Champlain returned to France just before an exclusive 1603 Nov 8. ounded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory eal of De Monts survived, and he quickened the courage of Champlain. After the short supremacy of Charles de Bourbon, the Pra Rochelle, obtained a colonial patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New Worlo the wishes of the unhappy Montmorenci, the new viceroy, Champlain, began a fort. The merchants grudged the expense. It isnd to Richelieu; and though disasters inter- 1627 vened, Champlain successfully established the authority of the French on t
De la Nouv (search for this): chapter 5
years of the discovery of the continent, 1504 the fisheries of Newfoundland were known to the hardy mariners of Brittany and Normandy. Charlevoix, Hist. Gen. de la Nouv. Fr. i. 3, edition of 1744, 4 to.; Champlain's Voyages, i. 9. Navarette, &c. III. 176—180, argues against the statement in the text. Compare Memoir of Caboton an expedition, from which, it is usually added, he never returned. Did he Chap. I.} 1525 Feb. 24. sail once more under the auspices of France? Charlevoix, Nouv. Fr. i. 7, 8. When the monarch had just lost every thing but honor in the disastrous battle of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have g, engrossed by the passionate and unsuccessful rivalry with Charles V., could hardly respect so humble an interest. But Chabot, admiral of France, Charlevoix, Nouv. Fr. i 8. a man of bravery and influence, acquainted by his office with the fishermen, on whose vessels he levied some small exactions for his private emolument,
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