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that, in the following spring, they removed to Port Royal. 1605 For an agricultural colony, a milder climate was more desirable; in view of a settlement at the south, De Monts explored and claimed for France the rivers, the 1605. coasts and the bays of New England, as far, at least, as Cape Cod. The numbers and hostility of the savages led him to delay a removal, since his colonists Chap. I.} 1606 were so few. Yet the purpose remained. Thrice, in the spring of the following year, did Dupont, his lieutenant, attempt to complete the discovery. Twice he was driven back by adverse winds; and at the third Aug. 28. attempt, his vessel was wrecked. Poutrincourt, who had visited France, and was now returned with supplies, himself renewed the design; but, meeting with Nov. 14. disasters among the shoals of Cape Cod, he, too, returned to Port Royal. There the first French settle- 1605 ment on the American continent had been made; two years before James River was discovered, and thr
Christopher Columbus (search for this): chapter 5
ashes the eastern shores of Asia. A ship, with a fair wind, said the Spaniard Seneca, could sail from Spain to the Indies in the space of a very few days. The students of their writings had kept this opinion alive through all the middle ages; science and observation had assisted to confirm it; and poets of early and more recent times had foretold that empires beyond the ocean would one day be revealed to the daring navigator. The genial country of Dante and Buonarotti gave birth to Christopher Columbus, to whom belongs the undivided glory of having fulfilled the prophecy. Accounts of the navigation from the eastern coast Chap. I.} of Africa to Arabia had reached the western kingdoms of Europe; and adventurous Venetians, returning from travels beyond the Ganges, had filled the world with dazzling descriptions of the wealth of China as well as marvellous reports of the outlying island empire of Japan. It began to be believed that the continent of Asia stretched over far more than
Hatteras Indians (search for this): chapter 5
ich he attained, was probably about the fiftieth degree. Of the country along which he sailed, he had occasion to admire the brilliant freshness of the verdure, and the density of the stately forests The pines, well adapted for masts and yards, promised to become an object of gainful commerce. But men were already with the Portuguese an established article of traffic; the inhabitants of the American coast seemed well fitted for labor; and Cortereal freighted his ships with more than fifty Indians, whom, on his return, he sold as slaves. It was soon resolved to renew the ex- Aug 8. pedition; but the adventurer never returned. His death was ascribed to a combat with the natives, whom he desired to kidnap; the name of Labrador, transferred to a more northern coast, is, probably, a memorial of his Chap. I.} 1501 crime Memoir of Cabot, 242. Navarette, Viages Menores, III. 43, 44. and is, perhaps, the only permanent trace of Portuguese adventure within the limits of North America
S. Miller (search for this): chapter 5
in, though it had the Chap. I.} 1524 good hap of a fortunate name, was overtaken by as terrible a tempest, as mariners ever encountered; and fifty days elapsed before the continent appeared in view. At length, in the latitude of Wilmington S. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 23. In the Libreria Strozziana in Florence, there is a copious manuscript account of Verrazzani's voyage and discoveries. Tiraboschi, VII. 261, 262. Verrazzani could congratulate himself on beholding land Mar which ere liberal and friendly; yet so ignorant, that, though instruments of steel and iron were often exhibited, they did not form a conception of their use, nor learn to covet their possession. Hakluyt, III. 361. Moulton's New York, i. 147, 148. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degrees.
Richard Eden (search for this): chapter 5
501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most northern point Herrera, d. i. l. VI. c. XVI. Gomara, c. XXXVII. Also in Eden, fol 227. Galvano, in Hakluyt, IV. 419. Purchas, i. 95, 916. Memoir of Cabot, b. II. c. III. and IV. which he attained, was probably about the fiftieth degree. Of the country along which he sailed, he had occasion to admire the brilliant freshness of the verdure, and the density of the stately forests The pines, well adapted for masts and yards, promised to become an object of gainful commerce. But men were already with the Portuguese an established article of traffic; the inhabitants
Alberico Vesputio Florentino (search for this): chapter 5
Upon the certainty of success, a throng of adventurers eagerly engaged in voyages, to explore the New World, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readily favored an expedition for northern discovery. Gaspar Cortereal See the leading document on the voyage of Cortereal, in a letter from Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most northern point Herrera, d. i. l. VI. c. XVI. Gomara, c. XXXVII. Also in Eden, fol 227. Galvano, in Hakluyt, IV. 419. Purchas, i. 95, 916.
ll fitted for labor; and Cortereal freighted his ships with more than fifty Indians, whom, on his return, he sold as slaves. It was soon resolved to renew the ex- Aug 8. pedition; but the adventurer never returned. His death was ascribed to a combat with the natives, whom he desired to kidnap; the name of Labrador, transferred fishermen; who, amidst the miseries of France, still resorted to Newfoundland. There exists a letter Rut, in Purchas, III. 809. to Henry VIII., from the haven Aug 3. of St. John, in Newfoundland, written by an English captain, in which he declares, he found in that one harbor Chap. I.} 1527 eleven sail of Normans and one Br France and an appropriate inscription. Henceforth the soil was to be esteemed a part of the dominions of the French king. Leaving the Bay of Gaspe, Cartier dis- Aug covered the great river of Canada, and sailed up its channel, till he could discern land on either side. As he was unprepared to remain during the winter, it then
Pietro Pasqualigo (search for this): chapter 5
Chap. I.} 1553 and no one knows his burial-place. It was after long solicitations, that Columbus had obtained the opportunity of discovery. Upon the certainty of success, a throng of adventurers eagerly engaged in voyages, to explore the New World, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readily favored an expedition for northern discovery. Gaspar Cortereal See the leading document on the voyage of Cortereal, in a letter from Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most
ce to the region of the St. Lawrence. It was in April, that Aprl 20. the mariner, with two ships, left the harbor of St. Malo; May 10. and prosperous weather brought him in twenty days upon the coasts of Newfoundland. Having almost circumnavigated the island, he turned to the south, and, crossing the gulf, entered the bay, which he called Des Chaleurs, from the intense heats of midsummer. Finding-no passage to the west, he sailed along the July 12. coast, as far as the smaller inlet of Gaspe. There, upon a point of land, at the entrance of the haven, a lofty cross was raised, bearing a shield, with the lilies of France and an appropriate inscription. Henceforth the soil was to be esteemed a part of the dominions of the French king. Leaving the Bay of Gaspe, Cartier dis- Aug covered the great river of Canada, and sailed up its channel, till he could discern land on either side. As he was unprepared to remain during the winter, it then Aug. 9. became necessary to return; the
exchanges they demanded knives and weapons of steel. Perhaps this coast had been visited for slaves; its inhabitants had become wise enough to dread the vices of Europeans. In July, Verrazzani was once more in France. His own narrative of the voyage is the earliest original account, now extant, of the coast of the United States. He advanced the knowledge of the country; and he gave to France some claim to an extensive territory, on the pretext of discovery. Chalmers's Annals, 512. Harris's Voyages, II. 348,349. The historians of maritime adventure agree, that 1525 Verrazzani again embarked upon an expedition, from which, it is usually added, he never returned. Did he Chap. I.} 1525 Feb. 24. sail once more under the auspices of France? Charlevoix, Nouv. Fr. i. 7, 8. When the monarch had just lost every thing but honor in the disastrous battle of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have sent forth another expedition? Did he relinquish the
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