hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Penn 436 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 276 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 254 0 Browse Search
George Fox 144 0 Browse Search
Edward Chalmers 138 0 Browse Search
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Hening 134 0 Browse Search
Nathaniel Bacon 128 0 Browse Search
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) 126 0 Browse Search
Oliver Cromwell 114 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition..

Found 8,235 total hits in 2,018 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
assembly was regularly held. Williamson's Maine, i. 566, &c. The reason assigned is as unfounded as the statement in Chalmers. In the grant of 1639, the assent of the majority of the free holders is required for all acts of legislation. Hazard, i. 445. It is true, the proprietary supremacy of Massachusetts was unpalatable to many. Willis's Portland, i. 158. Maine Hist. Collections, i. 302. The change of government in New Hampshire was Chap XII.} 1675 less quietly effected. On the first apprehension that the claim of Mason would be revived, the infant people, assembling in town-meetings, expressed their content with the government of Massachusetts. But the popular wish availed little in the decision of a question of law; the patent of Mason was duly investigated in England; it was found that he had no right to jurisdiction over New Hampshire; the unappro- 1677 priated lands were allowed to belong to him; but the rights of the settlers to the soil which they actually occ
hich was allied with royalism, and the great mass of the numbers and wealth of the country, resting on popular power, between the old monarchical system and the American popular system, was at hand. American freedom had then the principle of life, but was unconscious of its vitality, as the bird that just begins to peck at the shell. Opinions were coming into life; and the plastic effort of modern political being was blindly, but effectually at work. Bland, in Burk, ii. 247, 151. On the first Chalmers says, 1675; an error. spontaneous movement of the common 1674. people, the men of wealth and established consideration kept aloof. It is always so in revolutions. The revolt was easily suppressed by the calm advice of some discreet persons, in whom the people had confidence. Yet the movement was not without effect, the county commissioners were ordered to levy no more taxes for their own emoluments. Hening, ii. 315, 316 But as the great abuses continued unreformed, the mut
nder of the colony from the representatives of the Dutch, and renewed the absolute authority of the proprietary. The inhabitants of the eastern part of Long Island resolved, in town-meetings, to adhere to Connecticut. The charter certainly did not countenance their decision; and, unwilling to be declared rebels, they submitted to New York. In the following summer, Andros, with armed sloops, 1675 July 9 proceeded to Connecticut to vindicate his jurisdiction as far as the river. On the first alarm, William Leet, Chap. XVII.} 1675 the aged deputy-governor, one of the first seven pillars of the church of Guilford, educated in England as a lawyer, a rigid republican, hospitable even to regicides, convened the assembly. A proclamation was unani- July 10. mously voted, and forwarded by express to Bull, the captain of the company on whose firmness the independence of the little colony rested. It arrived just as Andros, hoisting the king's flag, demanded the sur- 11. render of Say
ition for their charter again. In the autumn of the same year, Andros, attended 1687. Oct. 26. Sewall's Mss. by some of his council, and by an armed guard, set forth for Connecticut, to assume the government of that place. How unlike the march of Hooker and his peaceful flock! Dongan had in vain solicited the people of Connecticut to submit to his jurisdiction; yet they desired, least of all, to hazard the continuance of liberty on the decision of the dependent English courts. On the third writ of quo warrant, the colony, in a petition to the king, asserted its chartered rights, yet desired, in any event, rather to share the fortunes of Massachusetts than to be annexed to New York. Andros found the assembly in session, and demanded Oct. 31. the surrender of its charter. The brave Governor Treat pleaded earnestly for the cherished patent, which Trum bull had been purchased by sacrifices and martyrdoms, and was endeared by halcyon days. The shades of evening descended durin
as probably Rockaway inlet, but finding only ten feet of water on its bar, he cast about to the southward, and almost at the time when Champlain was invading New York from the North, he sounded his way to an anchorage within Sandy Hook. On the fourth the ship went further up the Horse Shoe to a very good harbor near the New Jersey shore; and that same day the people of the country came on board to traffic for knives and beads. On the fifth a landing was made from the Half Moon. When Hudsoner county, went to walk on the west bank, found an excellent soil, with large trees of oak and walnut and chesnut. The land near Newburgh seemed a very pleasant site for a city. On the first of October Hudson passed below the mountains. On the fourth, not without more than one conflict with the savages, he sailed out of the great mouth of the great River which bears his name; and about the season of the return of John Smith from Virginia to England, he steered for Europe, leaving to its solit
e in sight. He stood towards the northernmost, which was probably Rockaway inlet, but finding only ten feet of water on its bar, he cast about to the southward, and almost at the time when Champlain was invading New York from the North, he sounded his way to an anchorage within Sandy Hook. On the fourth the ship went further up the Horse Shoe to a very good harbor near the New Jersey shore; and that same day the people of the country came on board to traffic for knives and beads. On the fifth a landing was made from the Half Moon. When Hudson stepped on shore, the natives stood Chap. XV.} 1609. round and sang in their fashion. Men, women, and children were feather-mantled, or clad in loose furs. Their food was Indian corn, which, when roasted, was pronounced to be excellent. They always carried with them maize and tobacco. Some had pipes of red copper, with earthen bowls and copper ornaments round their necks. Their boats were made each of a single hollowed tree. Their w
ed copper, with earthen bowls and copper ornaments round their necks. Their boats were made each of a single hollowed tree. Their weapons were bows and arrows, pointed with sharp stones. They slept abroad on mats of bulrushes, or on the leaves of trees. They were friendly, but thievish, and crafty in carrying away what they fancied. The woods, it was specially noticed, abounded in goodly oakes, and from that day the new comers never ceased to admire the greatness of the trees. On the sixth, John Colman and four others, in a boat, sounded the Narrows, and passed through Kill van Kull to Newark bay. The air was very sweet, and the land as pleasant with grass and flowers and trees, as they had ever seen; but on the return, the boat was attacked by two canoes and Colman killed by an arrow. On Wednesday, the ninth, Hudson moved cautiously from the lower bay into the Narrows, and on the eleventh, by aid of a very light wind, he went into the great river of the north, and rode al
gallows. A libertine without love, a devotee without spirituality, Chap. XVII.} an advocate of toleration without a sense of the natural right to freedom of conscience,β€”in him the muscular force prevailed over the intellectual. He floated between the sensuality of indulgence and the sensuality of superstition, hazarding heaven for an ugly mistress, and, to the great delight of abbots and nuns, winning it back again by pricking his flesh with sharp points of iron, and eating no meat on Saturdays. Of the two Life of James II 586. brothers, the duke of Buckingham said well, that Charles would not, and James could not see. James Burnet. put his whole character into his reply to Andros, which 1677. Jan. 1. is as follows:β€” I cannot but suspect assemblies would be of dangerous consequence; nothing being more known than the aptness of such bodies to assume to themselves many privileges, which prove destructive to, or very often disturb, the peace of government, when they are allow
ce in purchasing the island of Manhattan from its native proprietors. The Brodhead's Hist. of N. Y. 164, 165. price paid was sixty guilders, about twenty-four dollars for more than twenty thousand acres. The southern point was selected for a battery, and lines were drawn for a fort, which took the name of New Amsterdam. The town had already thirty houses, and the emigrants' wives had borne them children. In the want of a regular minister, two consolers of the sick read to the people on Sundays texts out of the scriptures, together with the creeds. No danger appeared in the distance except from the pretensions of England. The government of Manhattan wisely sought an interchange of friendly kindness and neighborhood with the nearest English at New Plymouth, and by a public letter in March, 1627, it formally claimed mutual good β€” will and ser- 627. vice, pleading the nearness of their native countries, the friendship of their forefathers, and the new covenant between the States
fancied. The woods, it was specially noticed, abounded in goodly oakes, and from that day the new comers never ceased to admire the greatness of the trees. On the sixth, John Colman and four others, in a boat, sounded the Narrows, and passed through Kill van Kull to Newark bay. The air was very sweet, and the land as pleasant with grass and flowers and trees, as they had ever seen; but on the return, the boat was attacked by two canoes and Colman killed by an arrow. On Wednesday, the ninth, Hudson moved cautiously from the lower bay into the Narrows, and on the eleventh, by aid of a very light wind, he went into the great river of the north, and rode all night in a harbor, which was safe against every wind. On the morning of the twelfth, the natives, in eight and twenty canoes, crowded about him, bringing beans and very good oysters. The day was fair and warm, though the light wind was from the north; and as Hudson, under the brightest autumnal sun, gazed around, having behi
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...