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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
thern country of Carolina had been explored by Virginians born. We are not left to conjecture, who of the inhabit- Chap. XIII.} ants of Nansemund of that day first traversed the intervening forests and came upon the rivers that flow into Albemarle Sound. The company was led by Roger Green, and his services were rewarded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of the Roanoke, or on the south sidiscovery led to immediate emigration, it is not possible to determine. The county of Nansemund had long abounded in non-conformists; Winthrop, II. 334. Johnson's Wonderw. Prov. B. III. c. XI. and it is certain the first settlements on Albemarle Sound were a result of spontaneous overflowings from Virginia. Perhaps a few vagrant families were planted within the limits of Carolina Williamson, i. 79, 91, and note on 93. Williamson cites no authorities. The accounts in the historians o
Chowan River (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
gland, the plantations of Virginia extended along the sea. The country on Nansemund River had been settled as early as 1609; in 1622, the adventurous Porey, then secre- 1622. Feb. tary of the Old Dominion, travelled over land to the South River, Chowan, and, on his return, celebrated the kindness of the native people, the fertility of the country, and the happy climate, that yielded two harvests in each year. Smith's Virginia, II. 64. If no immediate colonization ensued, if the plans formed he attention of the proprietaries, and Berkeley was commissioned to institute a government over the region, which, in honor of Monk, received the name that time has transferred to the bay. The plantations were chiefly on the northeast bank of the Chowan; and, as the mouth of that river is north of the thirty-sixth parallel of latitude, they were not included in the first patent of Carolina. Yet Berkeley, who was but governor of Virginia, and was a joint proprietary of Carolina, obeyed his inter
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ndon and his associates easily 1665 June 13. obtained from the king a new charter, which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the proprietaries a hope of revenue fro
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 3
which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the proprietaries a hope of revenue from colonial customs, to be imposed in colonial ports by Carolina legislatures; anoth
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ckell, 32, 46, 91, 154, 256, 259. What though Europe was rocked to its centre by commotions? What though England was changing its constitution? Should the planter of Albemarle trouble himself for Holland or France? for James II. or William of Orange? for a popish party or a high church party? Almost all the American colonies were chiefly settled by those to whom the uniformities of European life were intolerable; North Carolina was settled by the freest of the free; by men to whom the restFrance. Emigrant Huguenots put a new aspect on the north of Germany, where they constituted towns and sections of cities, introducing manufactures before unknown. A suburb of London was filled with Chap. XIII.} French mechanics; the prince of Orange gained entire regiments of soldiers, as brave as those whom Cromwell led to victory; a colony of them reached even the Cape of Good Hope. In our American colonies they were welcome every where. The religious sympathies of New England were awake
Dieppe (France) (search for this): chapter 3
sion of their religion was a felony, where their estates were liable to be confiscated in favor of the apostate, where the preaching of their faith was a crime to be expiated on the wheel, where their children might be torn from them, to be subjected to the nearest Catholic relation, —the fugitives from Languedoc on the Mediterranean, from Rochelle, and Saintange, and Bordeaux, the provinces on the Bay of Biscay, from St. Quentin, Poictiers, and the beautiful valley of Tours, from St. Lo and Dieppe, men who had the virtues of the English Puritans, without their bigotry, came to the land to which the tolerant benevolence of Shaftesbury had invited the believer of every creed. From a land that had suffered its king, in wanton bigotry, to drive half a million of its best citizens into exile, they came to the land which was the hospitable refuge of the oppressed; where superstition and fanaticism, infidelity and faith, cold speculation and animated zeal, were alike admitted without questi
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
ted in the charter granted by Louis XVIII. to France— except through the grand council; and in caseer of Albemarle trouble himself for Holland or France? for James II. or William of Orange? for a where the Huguenots had engraved the lilies of France, and erected the fortress of Carolina. Ramse resolved to enlist the military resources of France in the service, and to dragoon the Calvinists , the skill in manufactures, and the wealth of France. Emigrant Huguenots put a new aspect on the nough the attempt to emigrate was by the law of France a felony? In spite of every precaution of theed to undergo, died of a fever. Since leaving France, we had experienced every kind of affliction—d are full of monuments of the emigrations from France. When the struggle for independence arrived, s ancestors, would not allow his jealousies of France to be lulled, and exerted a powerful influence Huguenots. The children of the Calvinists of France have reason to respect the memory of their anc[1 more...]<
Somerset (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
churchmen alone emigrate. The condition of dissenters in England was no longer a state of security or liberty; and the promise of equal immunities tempted many of them beyond the Atlantic, to colonies where their worship was tolerated, and their civil rights asserted. Of these, many were attracted to the glowing clime of Carolina, carrying with them intelligence, industry, and sobriety. A contemporary historian commemorates with singular praise the com- 1683. pany of dissenters from Somersetshire, who were conducted to Charlestown by Joseph Blake, brother to the gallant admiral, so celebrated for naval genius and love of country. Blake was already advanced in life; Chap XIII.} but he could not endure the present miseries of oppression, and feared still greater evils from a popish successor; Oldmixon, i. 337, 338, and 341. Oldmixon is here good authority. Comp. Hewat, i. 89. and he devoted to the advancement of emigration all the fortune which he had inherited as the fruit
Bordeaux (France) (search for this): chapter 3
f many that found a shelter in Carolina, the general asylum of the Calvinist refugees. Escaping from a land where the profession of their religion was a felony, where their estates were liable to be confiscated in favor of the apostate, where the preaching of their faith was a crime to be expiated on the wheel, where their children might be torn from them, to be subjected to the nearest Catholic relation, —the fugitives from Languedoc on the Mediterranean, from Rochelle, and Saintange, and Bordeaux, the provinces on the Bay of Biscay, from St. Quentin, Poictiers, and the beautiful valley of Tours, from St. Lo and Dieppe, men who had the virtues of the English Puritans, without their bigotry, came to the land to which the tolerant benevolence of Shaftesbury had invited the believer of every creed. From a land that had suffered its king, in wanton bigotry, to drive half a million of its best citizens into exile, they came to the land which was the hospitable refuge of the oppressed; wh
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ch the people of North Carolina met the first messengers of religion. From the commencement of the settlement, 1672 there seems not to have been a minister in the land; there was no public worship but such as burst from the hearts of the people themselves, if at times natural feeling took the form of words, and the planters hailed Heaven as they went forth to the tasks of the morning. But man is by nature prone to religious impressions; and when at last William Edmundson came to visit his Quaker brethren among the groves of Albemarle, he met with a tender people; Fox's Journal. 453. delivered his doctrine in the authority of truth, and made converts to the society of Friends. A quarterly meeting of discipline was established; and the society, of which opposition to spiritual authority is the badge, was the first to organize a religious government in Carolina. Martin, i. 155, 156. In the autumn of the same year, George Fox, the Chap. XIII.} 1672 father of the sect, the u
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