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etter hopes,—undismayed by the sad fate of Gareau and Mesnard,—indifferent to hunger, nakedness, and cold, to the wreck of the ships of bark, and to fatigues and weariness, by night and by day,—in August, 1665, Father Claude Allouez embarked on a 1665 Aug. 8. mission, by way of the Ottawa, to the far west. Early in September, he reached the rapids, through which the waters of the upper lakes rush to the Huron, and admired the beautiful river, with its woody isles and inviting bays. On the second of that month, he entered the lake which the savages reverenced as a divinity, and of which the entrance presents a spectacle of magnificence rarely excelled in the rugged scenery of the north. He passed the lofty ridge of School craft naked sand, which stretches along the shore its stupendous piles of drifting barrenness; he sailed by the cliffs of pictured sandstone, which, for twelve miles, rise three hundred feet in height, fretted by the violence of the chafing waves into arches and b<
d it unmoved. Heaven and man seemed his enemies; and, with the giant energy of an indomitable will, having lost his hopes of fortune, his hopes of fame,— with his colony diminished to about forty, among whom discontent—had given birth to plans of crime,— with no Europeans nearer than the River Panuco, no French nearer than Illinois,--he resolved to travel on foot to his countrymen at the north, and return from Canada to renew his colony in Texas. Leaving twenty men at Fort St. Louis, in January, 1687 Jan. 12. 1687, La Salle, with sixteen men, departed for Canada. Lading their baggage on the wild horses from the Cenis, which found their pasture every where in tile prairies; in shoes made of green buffalo hides; for want of other paths, following the track of the buffalo, and using skins as the only shelter against rain; winning favor with the savages by the confiding courage of their leader;—they ascended the streams towards the first ridge of highlands, walking through beautif
January 4th (search for this): chapter 2
Franciscans, Chap. XX.} with Tonti and about thirty followers, ascended the St. Joseph's, and, by a short portage over bogs and 1679 swamps made dangerous by a snow-storm, entered the Kankakee. Descending its narrow stream, before the end of December, the little company had reached the site of an Indian village on the Illinois, probably not far from Ottawa, in La Salle county. The tribe was absent, passing the winter in the chase. On the banks of Lake Peoria, Indians appeared;— 1680 Jan. 4. they were Illinois; and, desirous to obtain axes and fire-arms, they offered the calumet, and agreed to an alliance: if the Iroquois should renew their invasions, they would claim the French as allies. They heard with joy that colonies were to be established in their territory; they described the course of the Mississippi, and they were willing to guide the strangers to its mouth. The spirit and prudence of La Salle, who was the life of the enterprise, won the friendship of the natives.
January 10th (search for this): chapter 2
the island, they were Nov 25. more at variance than ever. They double Cape Anto- Dec. 12. 28. nio; they discover land on the continent; aware of the easterly direction of the Gulf Stream, they sail slowly in the opposite course. On the tenth day of January, 1685 Jan. 10. 1685, they must have been near the mouth of the Mississippi; but La Salle thought not, and the fleet sailed by. Presently, he perceived his error, and desired to Chap. XX.} return; but Beaujeu refused; and thus they saileJan. 10. 1685, they must have been near the mouth of the Mississippi; but La Salle thought not, and the fleet sailed by. Presently, he perceived his error, and desired to Chap. XX.} return; but Beaujeu refused; and thus they sailed to 1685 the west, and still to the west, till they reached the Bay of Matagorda. Weary of differences with Beaujeu,—believing the streams that had their outlet in the bay might be either branches from the Mississippi, or lead to its vicinity, La Salle resolved to disembark. While he was busy in providing for the safety of his men, his store-ship, on entering the harbor, was wrecked by the careless pilot. Others gazed listlessly; La Salle, calming the terrible energy of his grief at the su
January 12th (search for this): chapter 2
Heaven and man seemed his enemies; and, with the giant energy of an indomitable will, having lost his hopes of fortune, his hopes of fame,— with his colony diminished to about forty, among whom discontent—had given birth to plans of crime,— with no Europeans nearer than the River Panuco, no French nearer than Illinois,--he resolved to travel on foot to his countrymen at the north, and return from Canada to renew his colony in Texas. Leaving twenty men at Fort St. Louis, in January, 1687 Jan. 12. 1687, La Salle, with sixteen men, departed for Canada. Lading their baggage on the wild horses from the Cenis, which found their pasture every where in tile prairies; in shoes made of green buffalo hides; for want of other paths, following the track of the buffalo, and using skins as the only shelter against rain; winning favor with the savages by the confiding courage of their leader;—they ascended the streams towards the first ridge of highlands, walking through beautiful Chap. XX.}
ood judgment, toiled, though in vain, for the culture of Huron children. Meantime, a colony of the Hurons had been estab- 1637 lished in the vicinity of Quebec; and the name of Silleri is the monument to the philanthropy of its projector. Here savages were to be trained to the faith and the manners of civilization. Of Montreal, selected to be a nearer rendezvous for converted Indians, possession was taken, in 1640, by a 1640 solemn mass, celebrated beneath a tent. In the following February, in France, at the cathedral of Our Lady 1641 of Paris, a general supplication was made that the Queen of Angels would take the Island of Montreal under her protection. In August of the same year, in the presence of the French gathered from all parts of Canada, and of the native warriors summoned from the wilderness, the festival of the assumption was solemnized Chap. XX.} on the island itself. Henceforward, the hearth of the sacred fires of the Wyandots was consecrated to the Virgin.
February 14th (search for this): chapter 2
Onondaga. The deputies of the Senecas, the Cayugas, and the Onondagas, assembled to the sound of the bell that had belonged to the Aug. 12. chapel of the Jesuits; and the resolve of the council was, peace. But he could influence only the upper nations. The Mohawks would not be appeased; Montreal was not safe—one ecclesiastic was killed 1662. near its gates; a new organization of the colony was needed, or it would come to an end. The company of the hundred associates resolved, 1663. Feb. 14. therefore, to resign the colony to the king; and immediately, under the auspices of Colbert, it was conceded to the new company of the West Indies. A powerful appeal was made, in favor of Canada, to the king; the company of Jesuits publicly invited him to assume its defence, and become their champion against the Iroquois. After various efforts at fit appointments, the year 1665 saw the colony of New France protected by a royal regiment, with the aged but indefatigable Tracy as viceroy;
rmed conjectures respecting the Tennessee River; and then, as new recruits were needed, and sails and New Discovery, i. III. cordage for the bark, in the month of March, with a Charlevoix, i. 461, copies the error of the publisher of Tonti. musket and a pouch of powder and shot, with a blanket for his protection, and skins of which to make mocthe pubof casins, he, with three companions, set off on foot for Fort Frontenac, to trudge through thickets and for- 1680 Mar. ests, to wade through marshes and melting snows, having for his pathway the ridge of highlands which divide the basin of the Ohio from that of the lakes,— without drink, except water from thin canoes; and, after an absence of about four months, and the loss of twelve or thirteen men, he re- 1686 turned in rags, having failed to find the fatal river, Mar. and yet renewing hope by his presence. In April, he plunged into the wilderness, with twenty companions, lured towards New Mexico by the brilliant fictions of the
March 16th (search for this): chapter 2
a death-blow from a halbert. The victim to the heroism of charity died, the name of Jesus on his lips: the wilderness gave him a grave; the Huron nation were his mourners. By his religious associates it was believed that he appeared twice after his death, youthfully radiant in the sweetest form of celestial glory; that, as the reward for his torments, a crowd of souls, redeemed from purgatory, were his honoring escort into heaven. Not a year elapsed, when, in the dead of a Cana- 1649. March 16. dian winter, a party of a thousand Iroquois fell, before dawn, upon the little village of St. Ignatius. It was sufficiently fortified, but only four hundred persons were present, and there were no sentinels. The palisades were set on fire, and an indiscriminate massacre of the sleeping inhabitants followed. The village of St. Louis was alarmed, and its women and children fly to the woods, while eighty warriors prepare a defence. A breach is made in the palisades; the enemy enter; and
March 17th (search for this): chapter 2
a branch of Trinity River. In the little company of wanderers, there were two men, Duhaut and L'Archeveque, who had embarked their capital in the enterprise. Of these, Duhaut had long shown a spirit Joutel, 120, 137, 148 of mutiny: the base malignity of disappointed avarice, maddened by suffering, and impatient of control, awakened the fiercest passions of ungovernable hatred. Inviting Moranget to take charge of the fruits of a buffalo hunt, they quarrelled with him, and murdered him. March 17. Wondering at the delay of his nephew's return, La Salle, on the twentieth of March, went to seek him. At the brink of the river, he observed eagles hovering as if over carrion; and he fired an alarm gun. Warned by the sound, Duhaut and L'Archeveque crossed the river; the former skulked in the prairie grass; of the latter, La Salle asked, Where is my nephew? At the moment of the answer, Duhaut fired; and, without uttering a word, La Salle fell dead You are down now, grand bashaw! you are
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