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Lake Huron (search for this): chapter 2
ar, had, on foot, or paddling a bark canoe, gone onward and still on- Sagard, Hist. du Canada. ward, taking alms of the savages, till he reached the rivers of Lake Huron. While Quebec contained scarce fifty inhabitants, 1623, 1625 priests of the Franciscan order—Le Caron, Viel, Sa- Chap. XX.} gard—had labored for years as and forests, from Quebec to the heart of the Huron wilderness. There, to the north-west of Lake Toronto, near the shore of Lake Iroquois, which is but a bay of Lake Huron, they raised the first hum- 1634 Sept. ble house of the Society of Jesus among the Hurons— the cradle, it was said, of his church who dwelt at Bethlehem in a c over a wonted track till beyond the French River; then they passed onward over the beautifully clear waters and between the thickly clustering archipelagoes of Lake Huron, beyond the Manitoulins and other isles along the shore, to the straits that form the outlet of Lake Superior. There, at the falls, after a navigation of seven<
Jamaica (Jamaica) (search for this): chapter 2
usbanded for commerce and the arts. Even before the days of Colbert, the colonial rivalry with England had begun. When Queen Elizabeth gave a charter to a first not very successful English East India company, France, under Richelieu, strug- Chap. XX.} gled also, though vainly, to share the great commerce with Asia. The same year in which England took possession of Barbadoes, Frenchmen occupied the half of St. Christopher's. Did England add half St. Christopher's, Nevis, and, at last, Jamaica,—France gained Martinique and Guadaloupe, with smaller islets, founded a colony at Cayenne, and, by the aid of bucaniers, took possession of the west of Hayti. England, by its devices of tariffs and prohibitions, and by the royal assent to the act of navigation, sought to call into action every power of production, hardly a year before 1664 to 1667 to Colbert hoped, in like manner, by artificial legislation, to foster the manufactures and finances of France, and to insure to that kingdom
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
journey farther to the west, beyond the Great Lake, then still without a name—warlike tribes, with fixed abodes, cultivators of maize and tobacco, of an unknown race and language. Thus did the religious zeal of the French bear the cross to the banks of the St. Mary and the confines of Lake Superior, and look wistfully towards the homes of the Sioux in the valley of the Mississippi, five years before the New England Eliot had addressed the tribe of Indians that dwelt within six miles of Boston harbor. The chieftains of the Chippewas invited the Chap. XX.} Jesuits to dwell among them, and hopes were inspired of a permanent mission. A council was held. We will embrace you, said they, as brothers; we will derive profit from your words. After finishing this excursion, Raymbault designed to rejoin the Algonquins of Nipissing, but the climate forbade; and late in the season, he returned to the harbor of the Huron missions, wasting away with consump- Relation 1642, p. 167. tion.
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
and French River; so that the whole coast of Ohio and Southern Michigan remained unknown, except as seen by missionaries fromdy of this first apostle of Christianity to the tribes of Michigan was buried in the particular sepulchre, Relation 1642, 1ving been one of the 1642. first to carry the cross into Michigan, was now the first to bear it through the villages of theuropeans within the present limits of the commonwealth of Michigan. For the succeeding years, the illustrious triumviratent St. Ignace, on the continent north of the peninsula of Michigan. The climate was repulsive; but fish abounded, at all se Marquette once more gained a place among the founders of Michigan. The countries south of the village founded by Mar- 1anted, near abundant fisheries, on the cold extremity of Michigan, entered, with equal Chap. XX.} humility, upon a career ng from Chicago to Mackinaw, he entered a little river in Michigan. Erecting an altar, he said mass after the rites of the
lousies of Europe extended, from the first, to European colonies; and the home relations of the states of the Old World to each other were finally surpassed in importance by the transatlantic conflicts with which they were identified. The mercantile system, being founded in error and injustice, was doomed not only itself to expire, but, by overthrowing the mighty fabric of the colonial system, to emancipate commerce, and open a boundless career to human hope. That colonial system all Western Europe had contributed to build. Even before the discovery of Amer- 1419. ica, Portugal had reached Madeira and the Azores, the 1448. Cape Verd Islands and Congo; within six years after 1449. the discovery of Hayti, the intrepid Vasco de Gama, 1484. following where no European, where none but Africans from Carthage, had preceded, turned the Cape of Good Hope, and arrived at Mozambique; and, passing the Arabian peninsula, landed at Calicut, and made an establishment at Cochin. Within a f
Joliet (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
About sixty leagues below the mouth of the Wis- Chap. XX.} consin, the western bank of the Mississippi bore on its 1673 June 25. sands the trail of men; a little footpath was discerned leading into a beautiful prairie; and, leaving the canoes, Joliet and Marquette resolved alone to brave a meeting with the savages. After walking six miles, they beheld a village on the banks of a river, and two others on a slope, at a distance of a mile and a half from the first: The river was the Mou-in-gou-is, that tenanted its banks, entreated Marquette to come and reside among them. One of their chiefs, with their young men, conducted the party, by way of Chicago, to Lake Michigan; and, before the end of September, all were safe in Green Bay. Joliet returned to Quebec to announce the discovery, of which the fame, through Talon, quickened the ambition of Colbert; the unaspiring Marquette remained to preach the gospel to the Miamis, who dwelt in the north of Illinois, round Chicago. Two years
Lake Superior (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e numerous tribes between the Kennebec and Lake Superior; it received misfortune without asking itss we write it, the Niagara, to the head of Lake Superior; but their narratives do but incidentally re, to the straits that form the outlet of Lake Superior. There, at the falls, after a navigation banks of the St. Mary and the confines of Lake Superior, and look wistfully towards the homes of t countless wild tribes from Nova Scotia to Lake Superior? They were at war as well with nature as a; of the powerful Sioux, who dwelt beyond Lake Superior; and they demand commerce with the French, the winter of 1659 on 1659. the banks of Lake Superior. Enriched with knowledge of the western w the Bay of Keweena, on the south shore of Lake Superior. After a residence of eight months, he yiors of the Sioux, who dwelt to the west of Lake Superior, in a land of prairies, with wild rice forry's. The invitation reached the tribes of Lake Superior, and was carried even to the wandering hor[5 more...]
ached Madeira and the Azores, the 1448. Cape Verd Islands and Congo; within six years after 1449. the discovery of Hayti, the intrepid Vasco de Gama, 1484. following where no European, where none but Africans from Carthage, had preceded, turned the Cape of Good Hope, and arrived at Mozambique; and, passing the Arabian peninsula, landed at Calicut, and made an establishment at Cochin. Within a few short years, the brilliant temerity of Portugal achieved establishments on Western and Eastern Africa, in Arabia and Persia, in Hindostan and the Eastern isles, and in Brazil. The intense application of the system of monopoly, combined with the despotism of the sovereign and the priesthood, precipitated the decay of Portuguese commerce in advance of the decay of the mercantile system; and the Moors, the Persians, Holland, and Spain, dismantled Portugal Chap. XX.} of her possessions at so early a period, that she was never involved, as a leading party, in the early wars of North Americ
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Bay, an escort of Potawatomies, he, the first of Europeans, repaired on the same mission of friendship to the Miamis at Chicago. The day appointed for the unwonted spectacle of 1671. May. the congress of nations arrived; and, with Allouez as hiated Marquette to come and reside among them. One of their chiefs, with their young men, conducted the party, by way of Chicago, to Lake Michigan; and, before the end of September, all were safe in Green Bay. Joliet returned to Quebec to announcColbert; the unaspiring Marquette remained to preach the gospel to the Miamis, who dwelt in the north of Illinois, round Chicago. Two years after- 1675 May 18. wards, sailing from Chicago to Mackinaw, he entered a little river in Michigan. ErectiChicago to Mackinaw, he entered a little river in Michigan. Erecting an altar, he said mass after the rites of the Catholic church; then, beg- Charlevoix, III 313, 14. ging the men who conducted his canoe to leave him alone for a half hour, in the darkling wood, Amidst the cool and silence, he knelt down, And
Trinity (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rack of the buffalo, and using skins as the only shelter against rain; winning favor with the savages by the confiding courage of their leader;—they ascended the streams towards the first ridge of highlands, walking through beautiful Chap. XX.} plains and groves, among deer and buffaloes,—now fording the clear rivulets, now building a bridge by felling 1687 a giant tree across a stream,—till they had passed the basin of the Colorado, and, in the upland country, had reached a branch of Trinity River. In the little company of wanderers, there were two men, Duhaut and L'Archeveque, who had embarked their capital in the enterprise. Of these, Duhaut had long shown a spirit Joutel, 120, 137, 148 of mutiny: the base malignity of disappointed avarice, maddened by suffering, and impatient of control, awakened the fiercest passions of ungovernable hatred. Inviting Moranget to take charge of the fruits of a buffalo hunt, they quarrelled with him, and murdered him. March 17. Wondering at <
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