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very of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In two barges, D'Iberville and his brother Bienville, Feb. 27. with a Franciscan, who had been a companion to La Salle, and with forty-eight men, set forth to seek the Chap XXI.} Mississippi. Floating trees, and the turbid aspect of 1699 the waters, guided to its mouth. On the second day in March, they entered the mighty river, and ascended to the village of the Bayagoulas—a tribe which then dwelt on its western bank, just below the River Iherville, worshipping, it was said, an opossum for their manitou, and preserving in their temple an undying fire. There they found a letter from Tonti to La Salle, written in 1684, and safely preserved by the wondering natives. The Oumas also were visited; and the party probably saw the great bend at the mouth of the Red River. A pa
ide, the men on the other. From prayer and instruction, the missionaries proceeded to visit the sick and administer medicine; and their skill as physicians did more than all the rest to win confidence. In the afternoon, the catechism was taught, in presence of the young and the old, where every one, without distinction of rank or age, answered the questions of the missionary. At evening, all would assemble at the chapel for instruction, for prayer, and to chant the hymns of the church On Sundays and festivals, even after vespers, a homily was pronounced; at the close of the day, parties would meet in the cabins to recite the chaplet, in alternate choirs, and sing psalms into the night. Their psalms were often homilies, with the words set to familiar tunes. Saturday and Sunday were the days appoint- <*>rest IV 208. ed for confession and communion, and every convert confessed once in a fortnight. The success of the mission was such, that marriages of the French emigrants were so
xcursion from Albany by land succeeded, Walley Cotton Mather Hutchinson. Hawkins. —had pilots, or fair winds, or decision in the commander, conducted the fleet more rapidly but by three days,—the castle of St. Louis would have been surprised Le Clercq Charlevoir. and taken. But, in the night of the fourteenth of October, Frontenac reached Quebec. The inhabitants of the vicinity were assembled; and the fortifications of the city had already been put in a tenable condition, when, on the sixteenth, at daybreak, the fleet from Boston came in sight, and soon cast anchor near Beauport, in the stream. It was too late. The herald from the ship of the admiral, demanding a surrender of the place, was dismissed with scoffs. What availed the courage of the citizen soldiers who effected a landing at Beauport? Before them was a fortified town de- Oct. 8/18. fended by a garrison far more numerous than the assailants, and protected by marshes and a river fordable only at low tide. The dive
. But they refused to invade the Abenakis. Had Frontenac never left New France, Montreal Chap. XXI.} would probably have been safe. He now used every effort to win the Five Nations to neutrality or to friendship. To recover esteem in their eyes; to secure to Durantaye, the commander at Mackinaw, the means of treating with the Hurons and the Ottawas; it was resolved by Frontenac to make a triple descent into the English provinces. From Montreal, a party of one hundred and ten, 1690. Jan. composed of French, and of the Christian Iroquois,— having De Mantet and Sainte Helene as leaders, and D'Iberville, the hero of Hudson's Bay, as a volunteer, —for two-and-twenty days, waded through snows and morasses, through forests and across rivers, to Schenectady. The village had given itself calmly to slumber: through open and unguarded gates the invaders entered silently, and having, just before midnight, Feb. 8. reached its heart, the war-whoop was raised, (dreadful sound to the moth
January 17th (search for this): chapter 3
d. It was at this time that Bienville received the me- 1699 morial of French Protestants to be allowed, under French sovereignty, and in the enjoyment of freedom of conscience, to plant the banks of the Mississippi. The king, answered Pontchartrain at Paris, has not driven Protestants from France to make a republic of them in America; and D'Iberville returned from Dec. 7. Europe with projects far unlike the peaceful pursuits of agriculture. First came the occupation of the Mis- 1700 Jan. 17. sissippi, by a fortress built on its bank, on a point elevated above the marshes, not far from the sea, soon to he abandoned. In February, Tonti came down from the Illinois; and, under his guidance, the brothers Chap XXI.} D'Iberville and Bienville ascended the Great River, 1700. and made peace between the Oumas and the Bayagoulas. Among the Natchez, the Great Sun, followed by a large retinue of his people, welcomed the illustrious strangers. His country seemed best suited to a settl
January 27th (search for this): chapter 3
ew women and children,—most of the men being disband- Chap. XXI.} ed Canadian soldiers,—embarked for the Mississippi, which, as yet, had never been entered from the sea. 1698. Happier than La Salle, the leader of the enterprise won confidence and affection every where: the governor of St. Domingo gave him a welcome, and bore Dec. a willing testimony to his genius and his good judgment. A larger ship of war from that station joined the expedition, which, in January, 1699, caught a 1699 Jan. 27. glimpse of the continent, and anchored before the Island St. Rose. On the opposite shore, the fort of Pensacola had just been established by three hundred Spaniards from Vera Cruz. This prior occupation is the reason why, afterwards, Pensacola remained a part of Florida, and the dividing line between that province and Louisiana was drawn between the bays of Pensacola and Mobile. Obedient to his orders, and to the maxims of the mercantile system, the governor of Pensacola would allow no
nt over the snows against the hunting parties of the Senecas in Upper Canada, near the Niagara. In the fol- 1693 Jan and Feb. lowing year, a larger party invaded the country of the Mohawks, bent on their extermination. The first castle, and the se by a fortress built on its bank, on a point elevated above the marshes, not far from the sea, soon to he abandoned. In February, Tonti came down from the Illinois; and, under his guidance, the brothers Chap XXI.} D'Iberville and Bienville ascendel. The snow lay four feet deep, when the clear, invigorating air of midwinter cheered the war party of about two hundred Feb. French and one hundred and forty-two Indians, who, with the aid of snow-shoes, and led by Hertel de Rouville, had walked on the crust all the way from Canada. On the last night in February, a pine forest near Deerfield gave them shelter till after midnight. When, at the approach of morning, the unfaithful sentinels retired, the war party entered within the palisades,
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 3
prior occupation is the reason why, afterwards, Pensacola remained a part of Florida, and the dividing line between that province and Louisiana was drawn between the bays of Pensacola and Mobile. Obedient to his orders, and to the maxims of the mercantile system, the governor of Pensacola would allow no foreign vessel to enter the harbor. Sailing to the west, D'Iberville cast anchor south-south-east of the eastern point of Mobile, and landed on Massacre, or, as it was rather called, Dau- Feb. 2. phine Island. The water between Ship and Horn Islands being found too shallow, the larger ship from the station of St. Domingo returned, and the frigates anchored near the groups of the Chandeleur, while D'Iberville with his people erected huts on Ship Island, and made the discovery of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In
February 8th (search for this): chapter 3
nglish provinces. From Montreal, a party of one hundred and ten, 1690. Jan. composed of French, and of the Christian Iroquois,— having De Mantet and Sainte Helene as leaders, and D'Iberville, the hero of Hudson's Bay, as a volunteer, —for two-and-twenty days, waded through snows and morasses, through forests and across rivers, to Schenectady. The village had given itself calmly to slumber: through open and unguarded gates the invaders entered silently, and having, just before midnight, Feb. 8. reached its heart, the war-whoop was raised, (dreadful sound to the mothers of that place and their children!) and the dwellings set on fire. Of the inhabitants, some, half clad, fled through the snows to Albany; sixty were massacred, of whom seventeen were children, and ten were Africans. For such ends had the hardships of a winter's expedition, frost, famine, and frequent deaths, been encountered: such was war. The party from Three Rivers, led by Hertel, and consisting of but fifty-t
February 27th (search for this): chapter 3
ds being found too shallow, the larger ship from the station of St. Domingo returned, and the frigates anchored near the groups of the Chandeleur, while D'Iberville with his people erected huts on Ship Island, and made the discovery of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In two barges, D'Iberville and his brother Bienville, Feb. 27. with a Franciscan, who had been a companion to La Salle, and with forty-eight men, set forth to seek the Chap XXI.} Mississippi. Floating trees, and the turbid aspect of 1699 the waters, guided to its mouth. On the second day in March, they entered the mighty river, and ascended to the village of the Bayagoulas—a tribe which then dwelt on its western bank, just below the River Iherville, worshipping, it was said, an opossum for their manitou, and preserving in their temple an undying
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