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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Fort Albany (Canada) (search for this): chapter 3
8. morasses of the north-west, the homes of the Sioux and Miamis, the recesses of every forest where there was an Indian with skins to sell. God alone could have saved Canada this year, wrote Denonville, in 1688. But for the missions at the west, Illinois would have been abandoned, the fort at Mackinaw lost, and a general rising of the natives would have completed the ruin of New France. Personal enterprise took the direction of the fur- 1689 trade: Port Nelson, in Hudson's Bay, and Fort Albany, were originally possessed by the French. The attention of the court of France was directed to the fisheries; and Acadia had been represented by De Meules as the most important settlement of France. To protect it, the Jesuits Vincent and James Bigot collected a village of Abenakis on the Penobscot; and a flourishing town now marks the spot where the baron de St. Castin, a veteran officer of the regiment of Carignan, established a trading fort. Would France, it was said, strengthen its
Horn Island (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
acola remained a part of Florida, and the dividing line between that province and Louisiana was drawn between the bays of Pensacola and Mobile. Obedient to his orders, and to the maxims of the mercantile system, the governor of Pensacola would allow no foreign vessel to enter the harbor. Sailing to the west, D'Iberville cast anchor south-south-east of the eastern point of Mobile, and landed on Massacre, or, as it was rather called, Dau- Feb. 2. phine Island. The water between Ship and Horn Islands being found too shallow, the larger ship from the station of St. Domingo returned, and the frigates anchored near the groups of the Chandeleur, while D'Iberville with his people erected huts on Ship Island, and made the discovery of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In two barges, D'Iberville and his brother Bienville,
Norridgewock (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
mariners and soldiers on board. For a season, hostilities in Aug. 11. Maine were suspended by a treaty of peace with the Abenakis; but, in less than a year, solely through the influence of the Jesuits, they were again in the field, 1694 July 18. led by Villieu, the French commander on the Penobscot; and the village at Oyster River, in New Hampshire, was the victim of their fury. Ninety-four persons were killed and carried away. The young wife of Thomas Drew was taken to the tribe at Norridgewock: there, in midwinter, in the open air, during a storm of snow, she gave birth to her first-born, doomed by the savages to instant death. In Canada, the chiefs of the Micmacs presented to Frontenac the scalps of English killed on the Piscataqua. Nor did the thought occur that such inroads were atrocious. The Jesuit historian of France relates, with pride, that they had their origin in the counsels and influence of the missionaries Thury and Bigot; and, extolling the hardihood and the su
Turin (Italy) (search for this): chapter 3
ruin of New France, of which it was the centre. Cherished as the loveliest spot in Canada, its possession secured the intercourse with the upper Indians and the great highway to the Mississippi. In the mean time, the preliminaries of a treaty had been signed between France and England; and the war, which had grown out of European changes and convulsions, was suspended by negotiations that were soon followed by the uncertain peace of Utrecht. In 1706, the victories of Ramillies and of Turin were equally fatal; and France, driven from its outposts, was compelled to struggle for the defence of its 1708 own soil. The aged monarch, humbled in arms, reduced in power, chagrined as a king by the visible decline of the prosperity of his kingdom, dejected at the loss of foreign provinces, was now wounded in his affections. His children, his grandchildren, all but one feeble infant, were swept away: he remained alone. 1709 April 29. Bowing to the stroke of Providence, he desired peac
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ad hurried before him into the forest. But, from the cowering flock, how could a father make a choice? With gun in his hand, he now repels the assault, now cheers on the innocent group of little ones, as they rustle through the dried leaves and bushes, till all reach a shelter. The Indians burned his home, and dashed his infant against a tree; and, after days of weary marches, Hannah Dustin and her nurse, with a boy from Worcester, find themselves on an island in the Merrimac, just above Concord, in a wigwam occupied by two Indian families. The mother planned escape. Where would you strike, said the boy, Samuel Leonardson, to his master, to kill instantly? and the Indian told him where, and how to scalp. At night, while the household slumbers, the captives, two women and a boy, each with a tomahawk, strike vigorously, and fleetly, and with wise division of labor,—and, of the twelve sleepers, ten lie dead; of one squaw the wound was not mortal; one child was spared from design.
West Indies (search for this): chapter 3
is XIV. promised his good offices to procure this advantage for Cooke's Bolingbroke, i. 175. the English. Her Britannic majesty did offer and undertake,—such are the words of that treaty,—by persons whom she shall appoint, to bring into the West Indies of America belonging to his Catholic majesty, in the space of thirty years, one hundred and forty-four thousand negroes, at the rate of four thousand eight hundred in each of the said thirty years,—paying, on four thousand of them, a duty of toys, and refuse arms, England gained, by the sale of the children of Africa into bondage in America, the capital which built up and confirmed a British empire in Hindostan. The political effects of this traffic were equally perceptible in the West Indies. The mercantile system, of which the whole colonial system was the essential branch, culminated in the slave trade, and in the commercial policy adopted with regard to the chief produce of slave labor. The statesmen who befriended the system<
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e fisheries for cod. Hence the strife with Massachusetts, in which the popular mind was so deeply iThe idea originated with the government of Massachusetts, established by the people in the period tgiven by letters from the general court of Massachusetts, and extended to all the colonies as far, at least, as Maryland. Massachusetts, the parent of so many states, is certainly the parent of the of Lake Champlain, against Montreal, while Massachusetts should, with a fleet, attack Quebec. Thus did Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Chap. XXI.} York, having, at that time, each a governmentinancial policy of England. The people of Massachusetts, in their wants, authorized an emission of Florida. At the north, the province of Massachusetts alone was desolated: for her, the history afterwards, under the influence of Dudley, Massachusetts attempted its conquest. The failure of th an army were to be sent from Europe: from Massachusetts and Rhode Island, twelve hundred men were [1 more...]
Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) (search for this): chapter 3
rishing town now marks the spot where the baron de St. Castin, a veteran officer of the regiment of Carignan, established a trading fort. Would France, it was said, strengthen its post on the Penobscot, occupy the islands that command the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and send supplies to Newfoundland, she would be sole mistress of the fisheries for cod. Hence the strife with Massachusetts, in which the popular mind was so deeply interested, that, to this day, the figure of a cod-fish is suspended in tin making conquest of New York. Of that province De Callieres was, in advance, appointed governor; the English Catholics were to be permitted to remain,—other inhabitants, to be sent into Pennsylvania or New England. But, on reaching the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Frontenac learned the capture of Sept. 25. Montreal. On the twenty-fifth of August, the Iroquois, fifteen 1689. Aug. 25. hundred in number, reached the Isle of Montreal, at La Chine, at break of day, and, finding all asleep, set fire
Niagara Falls (search for this): chapter 3
freedom. If the issue had depended on the condition of the colonies, it could hardly have seemed doubtful. The French census for the North American continent, in 1688, showed but eleven thousand two hundred and forty-nine persons—scarcely a tenth part of the English population on its frontiers; about a twentieth part of English North America. West of Montreal, the principal French posts, and 1688 those but inconsiderable ones, were at Frontenac, at Mackinaw, and on the Illinois. At Niagara, there was a wavering purpose of maintaining a post, but no permanent occupation. So weak were the garrisons, that English traders, with an escort of Indians, had ventured even to Mackinaw, and, by means of the Senecas, obtained a large share of the commerce of the lakes. French diplomacy had attempted to pervade 1687 the west, and concert an alliance with all the tribes from Lake Ontario to the Mississippi. The traders were summoned even from the plains of the Sioux; and Tonti and the
Martinique (search for this): chapter 3
banner of France; and Acadia was once more a dependence on Canada. In January, 1692, a party of French and 1692. Indians, coming in snow-shoes from the east, burst upon the town of York, offering its inhabitants no choice but captivity or death. The fort which was rebuilt at Pemaquid was, at least, an assertion of English supremacy over the neighboring region. In England, the conquest of Canada was resolved on; but Chap. XXI.} the fleet designed for the expedition, after a repulse at Martinique, sailed for Boston, freighted with the yel- 1693. low fever, which destroyed two thirds of the mariners and soldiers on board. For a season, hostilities in Aug. 11. Maine were suspended by a treaty of peace with the Abenakis; but, in less than a year, solely through the influence of the Jesuits, they were again in the field, 1694 July 18. led by Villieu, the French commander on the Penobscot; and the village at Oyster River, in New Hampshire, was the victim of their fury. Ninety-four
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