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Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 3
avorite. Long wars had enfeebled agriculture, and had exhausted the population; and the excess of royal vanity insured defeat; for the monarch expected victory to obey his orders, and genius to start into action from his choice. Two years passed without reverses; but the battle of Blenheim, fatal to the military reputation of 1704 France, revealed the exhaustion of the kingdom. The armies of Louis XIV. were opposed by troops collected from England, the Empire, Holland, Savoy, Portugal, Denmark, Prussia, and Lorraine, led on by Eugene and Marlborough, who, completing the triumvirate with the grand pensionary Heinsius, combined in their service money, numbers, forethought, and miliitary genius. In North America, the central colonies of our repub- Chap. XXI.} ic scarce knew the existence of war, except as they 1702 were invited to aid in defending the borders, or were sometimes alarmed at a privateer hovering off their coast. The Five Nations, at peace with both France and Eng
North America (search for this): chapter 3
orty-nine persons—scarcely a tenth part of the English population on its frontiers; about a twentieth part of English North America. West of Montreal, the principal French posts, and 1688 those but inconsiderable ones, were at Frontenac, at Mackith the grand pensionary Heinsius, combined in their service money, numbers, forethought, and miliitary genius. In North America, the central colonies of our repub- Chap. XXI.} ic scarce knew the existence of war, except as they 1702 were invitingly to the duke of Orrery, I believe you may depend on our be- Bol. Cor. i. 208. ing masters, at this time, of all North America. From June twenty-fifth to the thirtieth day of July, the fleet lay at Boston, taking in supplies and the colonialSt. John the colony of Louisiana excited apprehensions of the future undertakings of the Bol. Cor. II. 272 French in North America. The colonization of Louisiana had been proposed to Queen Anne; yet, at the peace, that immense region remained to F
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 3
ll of them her enemies. From regard to the integrity of its territory, the German empire, with Austria, joined with England; and, as the Spanish Netherlands, which constituted the barrier of Holland receive an impulse from France, 1713 the Netherlands were severed from Spain, and assigned to Austria, as the second land power on the continent. The house of Savoy was raised to the rank of roygdom of Naples, at first wholly severed from Spain, and divided between the houses of Savoy and Austria, soon became united, and was constituted a secundogeniture of Spain. These subsequent changes tress, the key to the Mediterranean. By insisting on the cession of the Spanish Netherlands to Austria, England lost its only hold on Spain; and by taking Gibraltar, it made Spain its implacable ene treaties, and grow familiar with natural rights; and it was possible that, even in the line of Austrian monarchs, a wise ruler might one day be penetrated with indignation at the outrage. With reg
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
parties against the English on the side of New York. The English were less successful in their plans of 1703 June 20. neutrality with the Abenakis. A congress of chiefs, from the Merrimac to the Penobscot, met Governor Penhal low Dudley at Casco: The sun, said they, is not more distant from the earth, than our thoughts from war; and, giving the belt of wampum, they added new stones Chap. XXI.} to the two piles which had been raised as memorials 1703. of friendship. Yet, within six weeks, the whole country from Casco to Wells was in a conflagration. On one and the same day, the several parties of the In- Aug. 10. dians, with the French, burst upon every house or gar rison in that region, sparing, says the faithful chronicler, neither the milk-white brows of the ancient, nor the mournful cries of tender infants. Cruelty became an art, and honor was awarded to the most skilful contriver of tortures. The prowling Indian seemed near every farm-house; many an individual was
Saint Marks (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
f Chap. XXI.} communication from St. Augustine to the incipient settlements in Louisiana; and, in the last weeks of 1705, a company of fifty volunteers, under the command Marsten, in Hawks' Mss. i. 29. of Moore, and assisted by a thousand savage allies, roamed through the woods by the trading path across Carroll's Coll. II. 574 and 352. the Ocmulgee, descended through the regions whicl none but De Soto had invaded, and came upon the In- Charlevoix, III. 473. dian towns near the port of St. Mark's. There seems Roberts' Florida, 14, 15. no reason to doubt that the inhabitants spoke a dialect Mills, 223. of the language of the Muskhogees. They had already Hewatt. learned the use of horses and of beeves, which multi- Ramsay. plied without care in their groves. At sunrise, on the fourteenth of December, the bold adventurers reached Dec. 14. the strong place of Ayavalla. Beaten back from the assault with loss, they succeeded in setting fire to the church, which adjoined the fort
Pascagoula (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
oreign vessel to enter the harbor. Sailing to the west, D'Iberville cast anchor south-south-east of the eastern point of Mobile, and landed on Massacre, or, as it was rather called, Dau- Feb. 2. phine Island. The water between Ship and Horn Islands being found too shallow, the larger ship from the station of St. Domingo returned, and the frigates anchored near the groups of the Chandeleur, while D'Iberville with his people erected huts on Ship Island, and made the discovery of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In two barges, D'Iberville and his brother Bienville, Feb. 27. with a Franciscan, who had been a companion to La Salle, and with forty-eight men, set forth to seek the Chap XXI.} Mississippi. Floating trees, and the turbid aspect of 1699 the waters, guided to its mouth. On the second day in March, they
Cocheco River (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nglish no trading house in the bay, except that of which, in 1685, they had dispossessed the French at Port Nelson. That post remained to the English; but the sons of Lemoine intercepted the forces which were sent to proclaim William of Orange monarch over jagged cliffs, 1689. and deep ravines never warmed by a sunbeam,—over the glaciers and mountains, the rivers and tradinghouses in Hudson's Bay. Exulting in their success, they returned to Quebec. In the east, blood was first shed at Cocheco, where, 1689. June 27. thirteen years before, an unsuspecting party of three hundred and fifty Indians had been taken prisoners, and shipped for Boston, to be sold into foreign slavery. The memory of the treachery was indelible; and the Indian emissaries of Castin easily excited the tribe of Penacook to revenge. On the evening of the twentyseventh of June, two squaws repaired to the house of Richard Waldron, and the octogenarian magistrate bade them lodge on the floor At night, they rise
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
veral hundred Huguenot and Vaudois refugees. But England was never destined to acquire more than a nominal possession of the Mississippi; nor could Spain do more than protest against 1700 what it regarded as a dismemberment of the government of Mexico. France obtained, under Providence, the guardianship of Louisiana, not, as it proved, for its own benefit, but rather as the trustee for the infant nation by which it was one day to be inherited. It was at this time that Bienville received th, she had expelled three millions of Jews and Moors; her inferior nobility emigrated to America: in 1702, her census enumerated less than seven million souls. The nation that once would have invaded England, had no navy; and, having the mines of Mexico and South America, it needed subscriptions for its defence. Foreigners, by means of loans and mortgages, gained more than seven eighths of the wealth from America, and furnished more than nine tenths of the merchandise shipped for the colonies.
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 3
o more a favorite. Long wars had enfeebled agriculture, and had exhausted the population; and the excess of royal vanity insured defeat; for the monarch expected victory to obey his orders, and genius to start into action from his choice. Two years passed without reverses; but the battle of Blenheim, fatal to the military reputation of 1704 France, revealed the exhaustion of the kingdom. The armies of Louis XIV. were opposed by troops collected from England, the Empire, Holland, Savoy, Portugal, Denmark, Prussia, and Lorraine, led on by Eugene and Marlborough, who, completing the triumvirate with the grand pensionary Heinsius, combined in their service money, numbers, forethought, and miliitary genius. In North America, the central colonies of our repub- Chap. XXI.} ic scarce knew the existence of war, except as they 1702 were invited to aid in defending the borders, or were sometimes alarmed at a privateer hovering off their coast. The Five Nations, at peace with both Franc
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
rmed at a privateer hovering off their coast. The Five Nations, at peace with both France and England, protected New York by a mutual compact of neutrality. South Carolina, bordering on Spanish Florida; New England, which had so often conquered Acadia, and coveted the fisheries; were alone involved in the direct evils of war. South Carolina began colonial hostilities. Its gov- 1702 Sept. ernor, James Moore, by the desire of the commons, placed himself at the head of an expedition for the states S. C. Statutes II. 189, 195. reduction of St. Augustine. The town was easily rav- Marston, in Hawks Mss. i. 180 aged; but the garrison retreated to the caed, three hundred were killed or taken prisoners. The colonists fought like brave men contending for their families and homes. Unaided by the proprietaries, South Carolina gloriously defended her territory, and, with very little loss, repelled the invaders. The result of the war at the south was evidently an extension of the En
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