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e for order and tranquillity at home, but, unaided by England, of themselves plan the invasion of Acadia and Canada. Acadia was soon conquered: before the end of May, Sir William Phipps, failing to bring seasonable supplies to Falmouth, sailed to Port Royal, which readily surrendered. New England was mistress of the coast to thtorms: of one, bearing sixty men, wrecked on Anticosti, five of the few who did not perish from the winter, boldest of navigators, landed in Boston in the following May, after a voyage of forty-four days in a skiff. Sir William Phipps reached home in November. The treasury was empty. Considering the present poverty of 1690 Dec.r the fort, which Du Buisson, with but twenty Frenchmen, defended. Aware of their intention, he summoned his Indian allies from the chase; and, about the middle of May, Ottawas, and Hurons, and Potawatomies, with one branch of the Sacs, Illinois, Menomonies, and even Osages and Missouris, each nation with its own ensign, came to h
ivers and tradinghouses in Hudson's Bay. Exulting in their success, they returned to Quebec. In the east, blood was first shed at Cocheco, where, 1689. June 27. thirteen years before, an unsuspecting party of three hundred and fifty Indians had been taken prisoners, and shipped for Boston, to be sold into foreign slavery. The memory of the treachery was indelible; and the Indian emissaries of Castin easily excited the tribe of Penacook to revenge. On the evening of the twentyseventh of June, two squaws repaired to the house of Richard Waldron, and the octogenarian magistrate bade them lodge on the floor At night, they rise, unbar the gates, and summon their companions, who at once enter every apartment. What now? what now? shouted the brave old man; and, seizing his sword, he defended himself till he fell stunned by a blow from a hatchet. They then placed him in a chair on a table in his own hall: Judge Indians again!—thus they mocked him; and, making cruel sport of their de
e, Feb. 27. with a Franciscan, who had been a companion to La Salle, and with forty-eight men, set forth to seek the Chap XXI.} Mississippi. Floating trees, and the turbid aspect of 1699 the waters, guided to its mouth. On the second day in March, they entered the mighty river, and ascended to the village of the Bayagoulas—a tribe which then dwelt on its western bank, just below the River Iherville, worshipping, it was said, an opossum for their manitou, and preserving in their temple an emed best suited to a settlement; a bluff, now known as Natchez, was selected for a town, and, in honor of the countess of Pontchartrain, was called Rosalie. While D'Iberville descended to his ships, soon to em bark for France, his brother, in March, explored Western Louisiana, and, crossing the Red River, approached New Mexico. No tidings of exhaustless wealth were gleaned from the natives; no mines of unparalleled productiveness were discovered among the troublesome morasses; and St. Deny
lie. While D'Iberville descended to his ships, soon to em bark for France, his brother, in March, explored Western Louisiana, and, crossing the Red River, approached New Mexico. No tidings of exhaustless wealth were gleaned from the natives; no mines of unparalleled productiveness were discovered among the troublesome morasses; and St. Denys, with a motley group of Canadians and Indians, was sent to ramble for six months in the far west, that he might certainly find the land of gold. In April, Le Sueur led a company, in quest of mineral stores, to mountains in our northwestern territory. Passing beyond the Wisconsin, beyond the Chippewa, beyond the St. Croix, he sailed north till he reached the mouth of the St. Peter's, and La Harpe Ms. did not pause till, entering that river, he came to the Long's Second Ex. i. 316. confluence of the Blue Earth. There, in a fort among Iowas, he passed the winter, that he might take pos- Martin. Charlevoix. session of a copper mine, and, on
. But they refused to invade the Abenakis. Had Frontenac never left New France, Montreal Chap. XXI.} would probably have been safe. He now used every effort to win the Five Nations to neutrality or to friendship. To recover esteem in their eyes; to secure to Durantaye, the commander at Mackinaw, the means of treating with the Hurons and the Ottawas; it was resolved by Frontenac to make a triple descent into the English provinces. From Montreal, a party of one hundred and ten, 1690. Jan. composed of French, and of the Christian Iroquois,— having De Mantet and Sainte Helene as leaders, and D'Iberville, the hero of Hudson's Bay, as a volunteer, —for two-and-twenty days, waded through snows and morasses, through forests and across rivers, to Schenectady. The village had given itself calmly to slumber: through open and unguarded gates the invaders entered silently, and having, just before midnight, Feb. 8. reached its heart, the war-whoop was raised, (dreadful sound to the moth
nt over the snows against the hunting parties of the Senecas in Upper Canada, near the Niagara. In the fol- 1693 Jan and Feb. lowing year, a larger party invaded the country of the Mohawks, bent on their extermination. The first castle, and the se by a fortress built on its bank, on a point elevated above the marshes, not far from the sea, soon to he abandoned. In February, Tonti came down from the Illinois; and, under his guidance, the brothers Chap XXI.} D'Iberville and Bienville ascendel. The snow lay four feet deep, when the clear, invigorating air of midwinter cheered the war party of about two hundred Feb. French and one hundred and forty-two Indians, who, with the aid of snow-shoes, and led by Hertel de Rouville, had walked on the crust all the way from Canada. On the last night in February, a pine forest near Deerfield gave them shelter till after midnight. When, at the approach of morning, the unfaithful sentinels retired, the war party entered within the palisades,
very of the River Pascagoula and the tribes of Biloxi. The next day, a party of Bayagoulas, from the Mississippi, passed by: they were warriors returning from an inroad into the land of the Indians of Mobile. In two barges, D'Iberville and his brother Bienville, Feb. 27. with a Franciscan, who had been a companion to La Salle, and with forty-eight men, set forth to seek the Chap XXI.} Mississippi. Floating trees, and the turbid aspect of 1699 the waters, guided to its mouth. On the second day in March, they entered the mighty river, and ascended to the village of the Bayagoulas—a tribe which then dwelt on its western bank, just below the River Iherville, worshipping, it was said, an opossum for their manitou, and preserving in their temple an undying fire. There they found a letter from Tonti to La Salle, written in 1684, and safely preserved by the wondering natives. The Oumas also were visited; and the party probably saw the great bend at the mouth of the Red River. A pa
October 30th (search for this): chapter 3
nd, had no navy; and, having the mines of Mexico and South America, it needed subscriptions for its defence. Foreigners, by means of loans and mortgages, gained more than seven eighths of the wealth from America, and furnished more than nine tenths of the merchandise shipped for the colonies. Spanish commerce had expired; Spanish manufactures had declined; even agriculture had fallen a victim to mortmains and privilege. Inactivity was followed by poverty; and the dynasty itself be- 1701 Oct. 30. came extinct. If the doctrine of legitimacy were to be recognized as of divine origin, and therefore paramount to treaties, the king of France could claim for his own family the inheritance of Spain. That claim had been sanctioned by the testament of the last Spanish king, and was desired by the Spanish people, of whom the anger had been roused by the attempts at partition. To the crown of Spain belonged the Low Countries, the Milanese, and the Two Sicilies, besides its world in the I
March 15th (search for this): chapter 3
e colonists; Louis XIV., James II., and his successors, Queen Anne, Bolingbroke, and Lady Masham, thought it no harm to derive money from the slave-trade; and, in the pages of Charlevoix, the unavailing cruelties of midnight incendiaries, the murder Chap. XXI.} and scalping of the inhabitants of peaceful villages, and the captivity of helpless women and children, are diffusely narrated as actions that were brave and beautiful. Once, indeed, a mother achieved a startling revenge. 1697. March 15. Seven days after her confinement, the Indian prowlers raised their shouts near the house of Hannah Dustin, of Haverhill: her husband rode home from the field; but too late to provide for her rescue. He must fly, if he would save even one of his seven children, who had hurried before him into the forest. But, from the cowering flock, how could a father make a choice? With gun in his hand, he now repels the assault, now cheers on the innocent group of little ones, as they rustle through t
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