hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
France (France) 418 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 196 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 162 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 108 0 Browse Search
Quebec (Canada) 106 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) 101 1 Browse Search
La Salle, Ill. (Illinois, United States) 90 0 Browse Search
C. Mather 88 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,492 total hits in 320 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
the chiefs Chap. XXIII.} in two rows; behind them were three hundred of the 1711. people, engaged in festive dances. Yet mercy was mingled with severity; and, if no reprieve was granted to Lawson, yet Graffenried, as the great chieftain of the Palatines, on pledging his people to neutrality, and promising to occupy no land without the consent of the tribe, was suffered, after a captivity of five weeks, to return through the woods on foot. He returned to desolated settlements. On the twenty-second of Sep- Sept. 22. tember, small bands of the Tuscaroras and Corees, Martin. Wiliamson Spotswood, Mss. acting in concert, approached the scattered cabins along the Roanoke and Pamlico Sound. As night came on, a whoop from a warrior called his fierce associates from the woods, to commence the indiscriminate carnage. The wretched Palatines, now tenants of the wilderness, encountered a foe more savage than Louvois and the hated Louis XIV. At Bath, the Huguenot refugees, and the planters
undless promise of untold treasures. The regent, who saw opening before him unlimited resources,—the nobility, the churchmen, who competed for favors from the privileged institution,—the stockjobbers, including dukes and peers, marshals and bishops, women of rank, statesmen and courtiers,—eager to profit by the sudden and indefinite rise of stocks, conspired to reverence Law as the greatest man of his age. It was in September, 1717, that the Western company obtained its grant. On the twenty-fifth day of the following August, after a long but happy voyage, the Victory, the Duchess of Noailles, and the Mary, bearing eight hundred emigrants for Louisiana, chanted their Te Deurn as they cast anchor near Dauphine 1715 B de la Harpe, Ms Hist. Du Pratz, i 24 and 38, with II. 260. Island. Already had Bienville, in the midsummer of 1718, as he descended the Mississippi, selected on its banks a site for tile capital of the new empire; and from the prince who denied God, and trembled at a<
they advanced to surprise the Chickasas. In vain. The brave warriors, whom they had come to destroy, were on the watch; their intrenchments were strong; English flags waved over their fort; English traders had assisted them in preparing defence. Twice, during the day, an attempt was made to storm their log citadel; and twice the French were repelled, with a loss of thirty killed, of whom four were officers. The next day saw skirmishes between parties of Choctas and Chickasas. On the twenty-ninth, the final retreat began; on the thirty-first of May, Bienville dismissed the Choctas, having satisfied them with presents, and, throwing his cannon into the Tombecbee, his party ingloriously floated down the river. In the last days of June, he landed on the banks of the Bayou St. John. But where was D'Artaguette, the brave commander Lett. Ed, IV 291. in the Illinois, the pride of the flower of Canada? And where was the gallant Vincennes, whose name, in honor of the founder of a sta
rty needy Frenchmen, who had been abandoned by their employer, and had no consolation but in the blandness of the climate and the unrivalled fertility of the soil. The decline of Louisiana was a consequence of financial changes in France. In January of 1719, the bank of Law became, by a 1719 Jan. 1. negotiation with the regent, the Bank of France; and a government which had almost absolute power of legislation conspired to give the widest extension to what was called credit. Law might havtural amphitheatres, where councils were convened, and embassies received, and the calumet of reconciliation passed in solemn ceremony from lip to lip. There the dead had been arrayed in their proudest apparel; the little baskets of food for the first month after death set apart for their nurture; the re quiem chanted by the women in mournful strains over their bones; and there, when a great chief died, persons of the same age were strangled, that they might constitute his escort into the realm
January 1st (search for this): chapter 5
, were engaged in his service or as his tenants, his commissioners lavished gifts on the tribes with whom they smoked the calumet. But when, in 1727, a Jesuit priest arrived there, he found only thirty needy Frenchmen, who had been abandoned by their employer, and had no consolation but in the blandness of the climate and the unrivalled fertility of the soil. The decline of Louisiana was a consequence of financial changes in France. In January of 1719, the bank of Law became, by a 1719 Jan. 1. negotiation with the regent, the Bank of France; and a government which had almost absolute power of legislation conspired to give the widest extension to what was called credit. Law might have regulated at his pleasure the interest of money, the value of stocks, the price of labor and of produce. The con- Marmontel. test between paper and specie began to rage,—the one buoyed up by despotic power, the other appealing Chap. XXIII.} to common sense. Within four years, a succession of de
January 5th (search for this): chapter 5
ted; and the regent's mother could write that all the king's debts were paid. The extravagances of stockjobbing were increased by the latent distrust alike of the shares and of the bills; men purchased stock because they feared the end of the paper system, and because with the bills they could purchase nothing else. The fraud grew to be apparent; the parliament protested that private persons were by the system defrauded of three fifths of their income. To stifle doubt, Law, who had 1720. Jan. 5. made himself a Catholic, was appointed comptroller- Feb. 27 general; and the new minister of finance perfected the triumph of paper by a decree that no person or corporation should have on hand more than five hundred livres in specie; the rest must be exchanged for paper; and all payments, except for sums under one hundred livres, must be paid in paper. Terror and the dread of informers brought, within three weeks, forty-four millions into the bank. In March, a decree of council March 1
January 8th (search for this): chapter 5
to extend their power along 1719. May 14. the Gulf of Mexico from the Rio del Norte to the Atlantic. But within forty days the Spaniards recovered June 29. the town, and attempted, in their turn, to conquer the French posts on Dauphine Island and on the Mobile. In September, the French recovered Pensacola, which, by the treaty of 1721, reverted to Spain. The tidings of peace were welcomed at Biloxi with heartfelt joy. 1722. During the period of hostility, La Harpe, in a letter 1720 Jan. 8. La Harpe, Mss to the nearest Spanish governor, had claimed Texas to the Del Norte as a part of Louisiana. France was too feeble to stretch its colonies far to the west; but its rights were esteemed so clear, that, in time of peace, the attempt to occupy the country was renewed. This 1722 second attempt of Bernard de la Harpe to plant a colony near the Bay of Matagorda had no other results than to incense the natives against the French, and to stimulate the Spaniards to the occupation of
January 28th (search for this): chapter 5
ctas, ever ready to engage in excursions, won them to his aid, and was followed across the country by seven hundred of their warriors. On the river the forces of the French were assembled, and placed under the command of Loubois. Le Sueur was the first to arrive in the vicinity of 1730 the Natchez. Not expecting an attack, they were celebrating festivities, which were gladdened by the spoils of the French. Mad with triumph, and exulting in their success, on the evening of the twenty-eighth of January, they gave themselves up to sleep, after the careless manner of the wilderness. On the following morning, at daybreak, the Choctas broke upon their villages, liberated their captives, and, losing but two of their own men, brought off sixty scalps, with eighteen prisoners. On the eighth of February, Loubois arrived, and 1730 Feb. 8 completed the victory. Of the Natchez, some fled to neighboring tribes for shelter; the remainder of the nation crossed the Mississippi to the vicin
he noblest valley in the world. Still the emigrants of the company, though, in the winter of 1718, one of their ships had sailed up the river, blindly continued to disembark on the miserable coast; and, even in 1721, Bienville himself a second time established the head quarters of Louisiana at Biloxi. Meantime, Alberoni, the active minister of Spain, Chap. XXIII.} having, contrary to the interests of France and of Spain, involved the two countries in a war, De Serigny 1719. arrived in February of 1719, with orders to take possession of Pensacola. This is the bay called, in the days of De Soto, Anchusi, afterwards Saint Mary, and 1558. 1693. Saint Mary of Galve. In 1696, Don Andres de Arriola had built upon its margin a fort, a church, and a few houses, in a place without commerce or agriculture, or productive labor of any kind. By the capture of the fort, which, after five hours resistance, surrendered, the French hoped to extend their power along 1719. May 14. the Gulf of M
February 8th (search for this): chapter 5
e careless manner of the wilderness. On the following morning, at daybreak, the Choctas broke upon their villages, liberated their captives, and, losing but two of their own men, brought off sixty scalps, with eighteen prisoners. On the eighth of February, Loubois arrived, and 1730 Feb. 8 completed the victory. Of the Natchez, some fled to neighboring tribes for shelter; the remainder of the nation crossed the Mississippi to the vicinity of Natchitoches. They were pursued, and, partly by Feb. 8 completed the victory. Of the Natchez, some fled to neighboring tribes for shelter; the remainder of the nation crossed the Mississippi to the vicinity of Natchitoches. They were pursued, and, partly by stratagem, 1731 partly by force, their place of refuge was taken. Some fled still farther to the west. Of the scattered remnants, some remained with the Chickasas; others found a shelter among the Muskhogees. The Great 1732 Sun and more than four hundred prisoners were shipped to Hispaniola, and sold as slaves. Thus perished the nation of the Natchez. Their peculiar language,—which has been still preserved by Chap. XXIII.} the descendants of the fugitives, and is, perhaps, now on the
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...