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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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May, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
over the judiciary, by chap. XVI.} 1760 making good behavior its tenure of office. Maryland repeated the same contests, and adopted the same policy. Already the negative had been wrested from the Council of Pennsylvania, and from the proprietaries themselves. The latter, therefore, in March, 1760, appealed to the king against seventeen acts that had been passed in 1758 and 1759, as equally affecting the royal prerogative, their chartered immunities, and their rights as men. When, in May, 1760, Franklin appeared with able counsel to defend the liberties of his adopted home before the Board of Trade, he was encountered by Pratt, the attorney-general, and Charles Yorke, the son of Lord Hardwicke, then the solicitor-general, who appeared for the prerogative and the proprietaries. Of the acts complained of, it was held that some were unjust to the private fortunes of the Penns, and all, by their dangerous encroachments, fatal to the constitution in a public consideration. In behal
July, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
e emoluments secured by law to the Church. In 1759, Sherlock, then Bishop of London, had confided his griefs to the chap. XVI.} 1760. Board of Trade, at the great change in the temper of the people of Virginia. It is surely high time, said he, to look about us and consider of the several steps lately taken to the diminution of the prerogative of the crown. The rights of the clergy and the authority of the king must stand or fall together. Connecticut, wrote a royalist Churchman, in July, 1760, to Seeker, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Connecticut is little more than a mere democracy; most of them upon a level, and each man thinking himself an able divine and politician; and to make them a good sort of people, he urged upon Halifax and Pitt, that the Church should be supported, and the charters of that colony, and of its eastward neighbors, be demolished. The present republican form of those governments was indeed pernicious. The people were rampant in their high notions of lib
August 11th, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
ditary council of privileged landholders, in imitation of the Lords of parliament. At the same time, he warned against the danger of applying a standing revenue to favorites, or bestowing beneficial employments on strangers alone, to the great discouragement of the people of the plantations. Influenced by a most favorable opinion of Colden's zeal for the rights of the crown, Lord Halifax conferred on him the vacant post of lieutenantgov-ernor of New York. Compare Colden to Halifax, 11 August, 1760, and Golden to John Pownall, 12 August, 1761. In the neighboring province of New Jersey, Francis Bernard, as its governor, a royalist, selected for office by Halifax, had, from 1758, the time of his arrival in America, been brooding over the plans for enlarging royal power which he afterwards reduced to form. But Pennsylvania, of all the colonies, led the van of what the royalists called Democracy. Its Assembly succeeded in obtaining its governor's assent to their favorite assessme
August 22nd, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
taries, its just prerogative, to check the growing influence of assemblies, by distinguishing, what they are perpetually confounding, the executive from the legislative power. When, in July, the subject was discussed before the Privy Council, Lord Mansfield made the extraordinary motion, that the attorney and solicitor general be instructed to report their opinion whether his Majesty could not disapprove of parts of an act and confirm other parts of it. Proprietary to Thomas Penn, 22 August, 1760. But so violent an attempt to extend the king's prerogative, at the expense of the people of the colonies and the proprietaries, met with no favor. At last, of the seventeen acts objected to, the six which encroached most on the executive power were negatived by the king; but by the influence of Lord Mansfield, and against the advice of the Board of Trade, the assessment bill, which taxed the estates of the proprietaries, was made the subject of an informal capitulation between them
September 27th, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
f economy that promised to the world freedom of commerce, a brotherhood of the nations, and mutual benefits from mutual prosperity. He rejoiced that the great master of English historic style,—who by his natural character and deliberate opinion was at heart a republican, Hume's Correspondence in Burton's Life of Hume.—loved to promote by his writings that common good of mankind, which the American, inventing a new form of expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two would prepare in America for all who should use English well. England cheerfully and proudly accepted the counsels which his magnanimity inspired. Promising herself wealth from colonial trade, she was also occupied by the thought of filling the wilderness, instructing it with the products of her intelligence, and blessing it with free instituti
October 25th, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
erely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bring for America an alteration of charters, a new system of administration, a standing army, and for the support of that chap. XVI.} 1760. army a grant of an American revenue by a British parliament. The decision was settled, after eleven years reflection and experience, by Halifax and his associates at the Board of Trade, and for its execution needed only a prime minister and a resolute monarch to lend it countenance. In the midst of these schemes, surrounded by victory, the aged George the Second died suddenly of apoplexy; and on the morning of the twenty-fifth day of October, 1760, his grandson, the pupil of Leicester House, then but twenty-two years of age, while riding with the Earl of Bute, was overtaken by a secret message that he was king.
August 12th, 1761 AD (search for this): chapter 16
imitation of the Lords of parliament. At the same time, he warned against the danger of applying a standing revenue to favorites, or bestowing beneficial employments on strangers alone, to the great discouragement of the people of the plantations. Influenced by a most favorable opinion of Colden's zeal for the rights of the crown, Lord Halifax conferred on him the vacant post of lieutenantgov-ernor of New York. Compare Colden to Halifax, 11 August, 1760, and Golden to John Pownall, 12 August, 1761. In the neighboring province of New Jersey, Francis Bernard, as its governor, a royalist, selected for office by Halifax, had, from 1758, the time of his arrival in America, been brooding over the plans for enlarging royal power which he afterwards reduced to form. But Pennsylvania, of all the colonies, led the van of what the royalists called Democracy. Its Assembly succeeded in obtaining its governor's assent to their favorite assessment bill, by which the estates of the proprie
March 8th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 16
the Governor of Massachusetts, a statesman who had generous feelings, but no logic, flashes of sagacity, but no clear comprehension, who from inclination associated with liberal men, even while he framed plans for strengthening the prerogative, affirmed, and many times reiterated, that the independence of America was certain, and near at hand. Not for centuries, replied Hutchinson, who knew the strong affection of New England for the home of its fathers. See Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 1766, where Pownall is reminded of the prophecy. But the Lords of Trade shared the foreboding. In every province, the people, from design, or from their nature and position, seemed gradually confirming their sway. Virginia, once so orderly, had assumed the right of equitably adjusting the emoluments secured by law to the Church. In 1759, Sherlock, then Bishop of London, had confided his griefs to the chap. XVI.} 1760. Board of Trade, at the great change in the temper of the people of
. As the Americans advanced triumphantly towards the realms where the native huntsman had chased the deer through the unbroken woodlands, they were met at the mouth of a river Rogers: Concise Account of North America, 240. Rogers: Journal, 214. The River was not the Cuyahoga, but one forty-six miles to the eastward of the river then called the Elk, and one hundred nine and a half miles to the eastward from Sandusky Bay. Howe's Ohio, 125. See the maps of Evans, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight miles; which could not be done by a vessel sailing from Cleveland to Sandusky. Rogers seems not accurate, though professing to be so to the half or the quarter of a mile. The distances appear to refer to the Ashtabula River; the name Chogage to the Geauga. by a deputation of Ottawas from the west. Pontiac, said they, is the chief chap. XVI.} 1760. and lord of the country you are in; wait till he c
John Adams (search for this): chapter 16
king, prayer was made for bishops, at least two or three. From the draught of a correspondence with Archbishop Secker. In the winter after the taking of Quebec, the rumor got abroad of the fixed design in England to remodel the provinces. John Adams: Works, IV. 6, 7. Many officers of the British army expressed the opinion openly, that America chap. XVI.} 1760. should be compelled to yield a revenue at the disposition of the crown. Some of them, at New York, suggested such a requisition e another, will overturn every thing. We must resist them; and that by force. And they reasoned together on the necessity of a general attention to the militia, to their exercises and discipline; for they repeated, we must resist in arms. John Adams's Works, IV. 6. In September of chap. XVI.} 1760. that year, Bernard manifested the purpose of his appointment, by informing the legislature of Massachusetts that they derived blessings from their subjection to Great Britain. Subjection to Gr
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