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Jacques Cartier (search for this): chapter 16
ad Amherst been more active, the preceding chap. XVI.} 1760. campaign would have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recovery of Quebec. In that city Saunders had left abundant stores and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under the command of the brave but shallow Murray. When De Levi found it impossible to surprise the placn town of a few hundred inhabitants, which Vaudreuil had resolved to give up on the first appearance of the English; and on the eighth day of September, the flag of St. George floated in triumph on the gate of Montreal, the admired island of Jacques Cartier, the ancient hearth of the council-fires of the Wyandots, the village consecrated by the Roman Church to the Virgin Mary, a site connected by rivers and lakes with an inland chap. XVI.} 1760. world, and needing only a somewhat milder clima
Cadwallader Colden (search for this): chapter 16
nature and a candor that ever endeared him to the friends of freedom. In the opinion of Cadwallader Colden, the president of the Council, This plan is in Colden's handwriting. No date is annexeColden's handwriting. No date is annexed; but its general tone points to the year 1760, just before he was made lieu-tenant-governor, and after the death of Delancey. He includes in his plan permanent commissions to the judges, which was reat discouragement of the people of the plantations. Influenced by a most favorable opinion of Colden's zeal for the rights of the crown, Lord Halifax conferred on him the vacant post of lieutenantgov-ernor of New York. Compare Colden to Halifax, 11 August, 1760, and Golden to John Pownall, 12 August, 1761. In the neighboring province of New Jersey, Francis Bernard, as its governor, a roye early life of Edmund Burke is not much known. I have seen a letter from John Pownall to Lieut. Gov. Colden of New York, dated 10 January, 1760, recommending Thomas Burke for the post of agent for t
James Delancey (search for this): chapter 16
forgotten,—an only son, heir to very large estates, a man of spirit and honor, keenly sensitive to right, faultless as a son, a son-in-law, a husband, possessing a gentleness of nature and a candor that ever endeared him to the friends of freedom. In the opinion of Cadwallader Colden, the president of the Council, This plan is in Colden's handwriting. No date is annexed; but its general tone points to the year 1760, just before he was made lieu-tenant-governor, and after the death of Delancey. He includes in his plan permanent commissions to the judges, which was the subject that at that time occupied his mind. the democratical or popular part of the American constitution was too strong for the other parts, and in time might swallow them both up, and endanger the dependence of the plantations on the crown of Great Britain. His reme- chap. XVI.} 1760. dies were, a perpetual revenue, fixed salaries, and an hereditary council of privileged landholders, in imitation of the Lords
ith provisions from America, was connected with the first strong expressions of discontent in New England. American merchants were incited, by the French commercial regulations, to chap. XVI.} 1760. engage in the carrying-trade of the French sugar, islands; and they gained by its immense profits. This trade was protected by flags of truce, which were granted by the colonial governors. For each flag, wrote Horatio Sharpe, who longed to share in the spoils, for each flag, my neighbor, Governor Denny, receives a handsome douceur, and I have been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brother Philip, 8 Feb., 1760. I, said Fauquier, of Virginia, have never been prevailed on to grant one; though I have been tempted by large offers, and pitiful stories of relations lying in French dungeons for want of such flags. Fauquier to Pitt, 1760. I have very many letters on this subject. In vehement and imperative words
Arthur Dobbs (search for this): chapter 16
utchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a patriot, resigned the office of advocate-general, and by his eloquence in opposition to the royalists, set the province in a flame. But the new chief justice received the iterated application for writs of assistance, and delayed the decision of the court only till he could write to England. There the Board of Trade had matured its system. They agreed with what Dobbs had written from North Carolina, that it was not prudent, when unusual supplies were asked, to litigate any point with the factious assemblies; but upon an approaching peace, it would be proper to insist on the king's prerogative. Lord Halifax, said Seeker of that nobleman, about the time of his forfeiting an advantageous marriage by a licentious connection with an chap. XVI.} 1760. opera girl, Lord Halifax is earnest for bishops in America, and he hoped for success in that great point, w
l supplies were asked, to litigate any point with the factious assemblies; but upon an approaching peace, it would be proper to insist on the king's prerogative. Lord Halifax, said Seeker of that nobleman, about the time of his forfeiting an advantageous marriage by a licentious connection with an chap. XVI.} 1760. opera girl, Lord Halifax is earnest for bishops in America, and he hoped for success in that great point, when it should please God to bless them with a peace. The opinions of Ellis, the governor of Georgia, who had represented the want of a small military force to keep the Assembly from encroachments; of Lyttleton, who, from South Carolina, had sent word that the root of all the difficulties of the king's servants lay in having no standing revenue, were kept in mind. It has been hinted to me, said the secretary of Maryland, that, at the peace, acts of parliament will be moved for amendment of government and a standing force in America, and that the colonies, for whose
n the trade of the continent with the foreign islands, but only in time of war to distress the enemy by famine. In August, the same month in which this impassioned interdict was issued, Francis Bernard, whom the Board of Trade favored as the most willing friend to the English Church and to British authority, was removed from the government of New Jersey to that of Massachusetts. But the distrust that was never to be removed, had already planted itself very deeply in the province. These English, men said to one another, will overturn every thing. We must resist them; and that by force. And they reasoned together on the necessity of a general attention to the militia, to their exercises and discipline; for they repeated, we must resist in arms. John Adams's Works, IV. 6. In September of chap. XVI.} 1760. that year, Bernard manifested the purpose of his appointment, by informing the legislature of Massachusetts that they derived blessings from their subjection to Great Britai
l of corn and abounding in game. As the Americans advanced triumphantly towards the realms where the native huntsman had chased the deer through the unbroken woodlands, they were met at the mouth of a river Rogers: Concise Account of North America, 240. Rogers: Journal, 214. The River was not the Cuyahoga, but one forty-six miles to the eastward of the river then called the Elk, and one hundred nine and a half miles to the eastward from Sandusky Bay. Howe's Ohio, 125. See the maps of Evans, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight miles; which could not be done by a vessel sailing from Cleveland to Sandusky. Rogers seems not accurate, though professing to be so to the half or the quarter of a mile. The distances appear to refer to the Ashtabula River; the name Chogage to the Geauga. by a deputation of Ottawas from the west. Pontiac, said they, is the chief chap. XVI.} 1760. and lord of the co
his is erroneous. Pitt at that time had not even seen Franklin, as we know from a memoir by Franklin himself. Gordon adds, that Pitt, in 1759 or 1760, wrote to Fauquier, of Virginia, that they should tax the colonies when the war was over, and that Fauquier dissuaded from it. I have seen Fauquier's correspondence; both the letteFauquier dissuaded from it. I have seen Fauquier's correspondence; both the letters to him, and his replies; and there is nothing in either of them giving a shadow of corroboration to the statement. Gordon may have built on rumor, or carelessly substituted the name of Pitt for Halifax and the Board of Trade. The narrative in the text I could confirm by many special quotations, and still more by the uniform thave been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brother Philip, 8 Feb., 1760. I, said Fauquier, of Virginia, have never been prevailed on to grant one; though I have been tempted by large offers, and pitiful stories of relations lying in French dungeons fo
Benjamin Franklin (search for this): chapter 16
the interior must manufacture for themselves, Franklin evoked from futurity the splendid vision of wo not rise, but when the winds blow. Thus Franklin offered the great advice which sprung from hi expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210.and their rights as men. When, in May, 1760, Franklin appeared with able counsel to defend the libeennsylvania, that, during his whole ministry, Franklin was never once admitted to his presence. Evet credulous Gordon, Pitt is said to have told Franklin, that, when the war closed, he should take meroneous. Pitt at that time had not even seen Franklin, as we know from a memoir by Franklin himselfFranklin himself. Gordon adds, that Pitt, in 1759 or 1760, wrote to Fauquier, of Virginia, that they should tax thel, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, t up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, [1 more...]
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